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1

The tabstackengine package has a \fixTABwidth{T} macro to force all columns to be equal width (based on the widest column). In addition to that, I just set the intercolumn gap with \setstacktabbedgap{} and the vertical baselineskip with \setstackgap{L}{}, to achieve whatever spacing is preferred, using a \parenMatrixstack macro. \documentclass{article} ...


0

Do you want something like this: \documentclass{article} \usepackage{amsmath} \usepackage{amssymb} \begin{document} sbhfgjksd safjksdhfjk sahjkfhsjk fsabf jksabfkjsbfk sfalsjfj, lnsadf snfjklsaflhwuioerhs lsdhfsda sadf safdlsalf nsafdjnsaklfsaklfd safdj\hfill$\emptyset$ sbhfgjksd safjksdhfjk sahjkfhsjk fsabf jksabfkjsbfk sfalsjfj, lnsadf ...


4

In addition to the vertical space between the final two rows of your matrix being smaller than that between other rows, the horizontal space between the first two columns (and between the final two columns) is smaller than that between the other columns. The first issue arises because the height of the \ddots glyph is -- assuming you're using the Computer ...


8

\allowdisplaybreaks doesn't work simply because you are nesting an align inside a gather environment. This causes the align to be wrapped in an unbreakable box. The solution is obvious: remove the gather environment, which is unneeded. But the align itself isn't generally wrapped in an unbreakable box. This is always true for the following amsmath's ...


8

In this code I define a \parunderbrace command, with two arguments, which adjusts automatically to the width of the formula: \documentclass{article} \usepackage{mathtools} \usepackage{ragged2e} \newlength\ubwidth \newcommand\parunderbrace[2]{\settowidth\ubwidth{$#1$}\underbrace{#1}_{\parbox{\ubwidth}{\scriptsize\RaggedRight#2}}} \begin{document} \[ ...


13

If you want to change the behaviour of \underbrace globally you could say \documentclass{article} \usepackage{amsmath} \makeatletter \let\ams@underbrace=\underbrace \def\underbrace#1_#2{% \setbox0=\hbox{$\displaystyle#1$}% \ams@underbrace{#1}_{\parbox[t]{\the\wd0}{#2}}% } \makeatother \begin{document} $\underbrace{f(x) = a^2 + 2ab + b^2}_{This is some ...


1

It's easiest to \let the defcounter to that of equation within your environment(s). That way defcounter is stepped whenever equation would be: \documentclass{article} \usepackage{amsmath} \newcounter{defcounter} \makeatletter \newenvironment{defeq}{% \let\c@equation\c@defcounter% equation is equivalent to defcounter ...


1

Using amsmath package the code: Method 1: \begin{align*} \int \left( \frac{x+3}{2}\right) \, dx =& \int \frac{1}{2}(x+3) \, dx && \text{Factoring out a constant} \\ =& \frac{1}{2} \int (x+3) \, dx && \text{Factoring the constant outside the integral} \\ =& \frac{1}{2}\left[\frac{1}{2}x^2+3x\right]+C && \text{Applying ...


3

Spaces (including a single carriage return) are gobbled under math mode. From the TeX Book, Chapter 18: Fine Points of Mathematics Typing (p 166): [consider] $$ F_n = F_{n-1} + F_{n-2}, \qquad n \ge 2. $$ It is perhaps worth reiterating that TeX ignores all the spaces in math mode (except, of course, the space after \qquad, which is needed ...


0

The fact that \qedhere doesn't work with alignat should be considered as a bug of amsmath. However, in this case you don't need alignat: \documentclass{article} \usepackage{amsmath} \usepackage{amsthm} \usepackage{lipsum} \begin{document} \begin{proof} \begin{alignat*}{2} &\quad& f &\le g \\ \implies && f-a &\le g-a ...


3

The best thing to do is to add some final words to conclude the proof. If this is not an option, then some trickery would be required; here, using \tag*: \documentclass{article} \usepackage{amsmath} \usepackage{amsthm} \usepackage{lipsum} \begin{document} \begin{proof} \begin{alignat*}{2} &\quad& f &\le g \\ \implies ...


2

Without expl3, you can convert integers to whatever you want with: \ifcase#1\or\or bis\or ter\or quater\or quinquies\or sexies\or septies\or octies\or novies\or decies\fi By substituting #1 by the number you want. In this case, we can create a macro, and pass \value{equation} as argument. In any case, I don't know what's the way the arabic numbers in ...


4

Perhaps the following set of commands might be something you're interested in: \documentclass{article} \usepackage[T1]{fontenc} \usepackage[frenchb]{babel} \usepackage{mathtools,refcount,xparse} % http://tex.stackexchange.com/a/254255/5764 \ExplSyntaxOn \seq_new:N \bislist \seq_set_split:Nnn \bislist {;} ...


0

This feature is offered by the amsmath package. If you run texdoc amsmath you will get a pdf with the manual. In the index you will find Section 7 "Integrals and Sums" and the first subsection is "Multiline subscripts". Following the instructions you get \[ \sum^{N_{cut}}_{\substack{i=1,\\ e_1\in C_i,e_2\not\in C_i}} \prod_{j\in C_i} ...


0

Bernard is correct about substack. I provide here MWE so easy to get things working also in the future when forgetting this again. \begin{equation} \sum^{N_{cut}}_ { \substack{ i=1 \\ e_1\in C_i,e_2\not\in C_i } } \prod_{j\in C_i}p_j - \sum^{N_{cut}}_ { \substack{ i=1 \\ e_2\in C_i,e_1\not\in C_i} } \prod_{j\in ...


1

You shouldn't use $$ … $$ for dieplay equations: this is a plaintex syntax, and it can give inconsistent vertical spacing. Use \[ … \] instead. The command you're looking for is \substack from amsmath. I replaced amsmath with mathtools, an extension of the latter. It has, among many features, commands for not taking into account the width of the indices in ...


0

\documentclass{article} \usepackage{amsmath,amsfonts} \begin{document} \begin{multline} \sum^{N_{cut}}_{i=1,\newline e_1\in C_i,e_2\not\in C_i} \prod_{j\in C_i} p_j \\ -\sum^{N_{cut}}_{i=1,e_2\in C_i,e_1\not\in C_i} \prod_{j\in C_i} p_j\geq 0 \end{multline} \end{document}


1

I suggest you replace \mathclap{#3} with \makebox[0pt]{$#3$} -- the latter method doesn't mess with the counter eqpart; (Aside: Any "advantage" the \mathclap method may have, in terms of auto-sizing the result via \mathchoice, is illusory since #3 is set in \displaystyle anyway, according to a subsequent part of your code.) add parentheses to the ...


3

use of $$ for displayed equations is deprecated. Instead it rather use \[ ...\]. In your case, this will not breake your set into two lines. For this you need some math environment fromasmath package or use tabular or arrayenvironment. Since you didn't provide MWE, I wrote one for you: \documentclass[12pt,border=3mm,preview]{standalone} ...


1

Just to slightly correct Thomas Weise's answer - if you compile a straightforward LaTeX document without loading any extra packages, then the fonts used will be Computer Modern (not AMS fonts). The Computer Modern fonts are not TrueType fonts, and they're distributed through the "Knuth license". TrueType versions exist as part of Bakoma, but they have a ...


0

I think the font LaTeX uses depends on the documentclass and other settings, but by default, it should be using the Computer Modern family of fonts. These can be downloaded from http://www.ctan.org/tex-archive/fonts/amsfonts/. I think cmsy-name like fonts contain math symbols, cmbsy-name like fonts contain bold math symbols, cmex-name like fonts even more ...


0

The how about doing something like scaling the symbol and shifting it a bit to look nice. I know this is not a good practice, but for a poster it should do: \documentclass[25pt, a0paper, portrait]{tikzposter} \usepackage[utf8]{inputenc} \usepackage{graphicx} \usepackage[T1]{fontenc} \usepackage{lmodern} \usepackage{amsmath} \usepackage{amssymb} ...


2

We can make the whole group fit one column if we break some equations and use the \medmath command (from nccmath) which reduces the formulae size by ~80%. I add another solution based on the split environment from cuted (a component of the sttools bundle) which allows to have full width formulae in a two-column environment, but in contrast to table*, is ...


3

My understanding of the equations you're trying to display isn't sufficient to judge if it's sensible to introduce additional line breaks in order to make them fit in a single column of the two-column document layout that's provided by the IEEEtran class. If it doesn't really make sense to introduce additional line breaks, I would suggest that you place ...


2

You need the amssymb package: \documentclass{article} \usepackage{amssymb} \begin{document} $H \unlhd G$ \end{document} Or even without the package you could say: \documentclass{article} \DeclareSymbolFont{AMSa}{U}{msa}{m}{n} \DeclareMathSymbol{\Bhaskarunlhd}{\mathrel}{AMSa}{"45} \begin{document} $H \Bhaskarunlhd G$ \end{document}


7

What's better from a typographic point of view -- inline-style fractions or display-style fractions while in display-math mode -- depends crucially on the contents of the fractional terms. For the two examples at hand, I can see nothing wrong with using inline-math notation, shown on the right-hand side of the two rows below. Incidentally, I'd say that ...


1

I propose three solutions: with the \splitfrac command (from mathtools) or reducing fontsize to \footnotesize, or using \mfrac from nccmath: it is a medium-sized fraction, about 80% of displaystyle: \documentclass[a4paper, 12pt]{report} \usepackage[utf8]{inputenc} \usepackage[showframe]{geometry} \usepackage{mathtools} \usepackage{nccmath} ...


2

You have no real hope of shrinking that big fraction, unless you use a shorthand: \documentclass[a4paper, 12pt]{report} \usepackage[utf8]{inputenc} \usepackage{graphicx} \usepackage{url} \usepackage{amsmath} \begin{document} \begin{equation} \label{eq:K} \begin{split} A = \Biggl\{\varepsilon_G b &+ \dfrac{\varepsilon_{HG} bK[H]_t} ...


1

Here are two ideas: Make the hint text white. Then, it won't be visible at first glance, but the reader can highlight it to read the hint. Some websites (e.g. TvTropes) hide spoilers this way. Put \usepackage{xcolor} in the preamble, and then use \textcolor{white}{(spoiler text for the hint goes here)}. More information Place the hint text upside down in a ...


0

You can use the comment package to easily hide text without removing or commenting out every line of your .tex file by placing everything you want hidden between \begin{comment} and \end{comment}. It isn't clear if this is what you're after, though.


3

While it is possible to tag equations in an align* environment, the \tag command does indeed uses a fixed equation 'number' etc. then. The align* environment however does not count the equation number, but the align environment does. If specific equations should not be numbered, \notag suppresses the numbering then. \documentclass{amsart} \begin{document} ...


3

You'd probably need something like this (simple cases cannot handle this) \documentclass[a4paper]{article} \usepackage{amsmath} \begin{document} \begin{equation} \left\{\begin{aligned} f(x)&=\tfrac{1}{12} \cdot r, & g(x) &= \tfrac{1}{24} \cdot x, & x&<12 \\ f(x)&=1, &g(x) &= \tfrac{1}{8} \cdot x - 1, & ...


1

Just to provide a few more ideas: \shortintertext{} which needs mathtools is my personal favourite and there's already an example \intertext{} is similar to \shortintertext{} but will have a larger space above and below the the math, also in the example \tag{} is different as it will put text in brackets at the end of the line of Math. If the tag text ...


2

Do you mean something like this? If you are referring to setting source code (LaTeX listings) you should clarify that a bit in your question. % arara: pdflatex \documentclass{article} \usepackage{mathtools} \begin{document} \begin{align} G(r) & \\ \shortintertext{comment} &= \frac{A}{B} \\ \intertext{a long comment could look like ...


5

Use \documentclass[12pt,fleqn]{article}


3

The alignment should be used with, well align or align* and left align with fleqn option of the amsmath package. In my point of view the constant block should use two (or even three constants) per row, not one large column. And I've changed the differentials d to use upright characters. \documentclass[12pt]{article} \usepackage[fleqn]{amsmath} ...


3

I do not know the best practises for theorems, but the normal way is that you need at least one \item outside the math mode. Please have a look on my second example which is the correct syntax here. % arara: pdflatex \documentclass{article} \usepackage{mathtools,amsthm} \newtheorem{theorem}{Theorem}[section] \begin{document} \begin{theorem} ...


2

You get an underscore with \_, but I do not think it's an underscore (too high). I suspect an arrow together with the "circ", which might be an triangle arrow head. The arrow version makes more sense in mathematics. The limes is calculated, when variable V converges to Vε. \documentclass{article} \usepackage{amsmath} \begin{document} \[ ...



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