Tag Info

New answers tagged

3

The ellipsis package does \AtBeginDocument{% \DeclareRobustCommand{\dots}{% \ifmmode\mathellipsis\else\expandafter\textellipsis\fi}% } which is wrong, because it reinstates the LaTeX kernel definition without taking into account that other package might have redefined it. The package author's aim is ensuring that in text mode the redefined ...


0

This is a solution I used some time ago. It adds \ellipsisbeforegap and \ellipsisaftergap just because I needed it. You can delete it. \documentclass{scrartcl} \usepackage{mathtools} \usepackage{ellipsis} \makeatletter \renewcommand*{\mathellipsis}{% \mathinner{% \kern\ellipsisbeforegap% {\ldotp}\kern\ellipsisgap% ...


7

\normallineskiplimit (and friends) are used in two places in latex, they are used in \@arrayparboxrestore \lineskip\normallineskip \baselineskip\normalbaselineskip so that inside \parbox and minipage and tabular p columns the baselineskip is restored to a normal state even if used in a context where they ave non standard values. \displaylines ...


0

Here's another difference I notice. According to the AMS User Guide (p. 6 and p. 29 in the Version 2.0 copy I have): The split structure should constitute the entire body of the enclosing struc- ture, apart from commands like \label that produce no visible material. The split environment is designed to serve as the entire body of an equation, or ...


4

You've not understood that to have two alignment groups, you need three &. I replaced amsmath with mathtools (which loads the former), in order to use the \mathclap command, to have better horizontal spacing around the (aligned) Σ's. \documentclass{article} \usepackage[utf8]{inputenc} \usepackage[T1]{fontenc} \usepackage{geometry} ...


3

One important difference is that split obeys to the centertags (default) or tbtags option. Here is an example \documentclass[twocolumn]{article} \usepackage[ % tbtags, % leqno, ]{amsmath} \begin{document} \begin{align} a&=b\\ \begin{split} c&=d+{}\\ &=e+{}\\ &=f \end{split}\\ g&=h \end{align} \end{document} Now the same with ...


3

The drawback of this solution is that the line is thickened, but the advantage is that it will work even if the equation gets "really really big". Here. I vertically auto-stretch a / to make the tall slash of any required height, but add width if necessary so that the overall aspect ratio of the stretched glyph can not exceed 500% (i.e., 5:1). ...


3

For example: \documentclass{article} \begin{document} \[ a=\textrm{\Huge VERYBIGSTUFF} \Biggm/ \textrm{\Huge VERYBIGSTUFF} \] or (compare the spacing) \[ a=\textrm{\Huge VERYBIGSTUFF} \Bigg/ \textrm{\Huge VERYBIGSTUFF} \] In a real situation it would look nicer: \Huge \[ a=\textrm{\Huge VERYBIGSTUFF} \Biggm/ \textrm{\Huge VERYBIGSTUFF} \] or ...


4

I'll present two possible solutions. Don't close the center environment “Abuse” the gather* environment At the top is the rendering with your input. Note that I removed underlining, which is frowned upon by typographers. Instead of \textbf you can also use \textit. \documentclass{article} \usepackage{amsmath} \begin{document} ...


2

You can load the nccmath package. I tried, thinking of using its \useshortskip command and discovered that just loading it works. Note that it loads amsmath, so that you can load it instead of amsmath. It doesn't load mathtools (recommended extension of amsmath), though: \documentclass{article} \usepackage{mathtools} \usepackage{nccmath} \begin{document} ...


1

It's the center environment not playing well with gather*: \documentclass{article} \usepackage{amsmath} \begin{document} \begin{center} \underline{First set of identities.} \[x+x = x\] \end{center}% \begin{center} \underline{Second set.} \begin{gather*} 0+x = x, \quad x+0 = 0 \\ (x+y)+z = x+(y+z) \end{gather*} ...


0

using https://github.com/loveencounterflow/cxltx-styles#cxltx-style-accentbox, you could simply write the following: \documentclass[a4paper,12pt]{book} \usepackage{cxltx-style-accentbox} \begin{document} \textit{Some variations with an asterisk placed above an `i':} i\upaccent{\tiny *}{\i}i\upaccent{\tiny *}{\i}i\upaccent{\tiny *}{\i} ...


1

I don't have a solution for easybmat support, but in your particular case you can simplify your code and use different, supported by tex4ht, matrix environment . dashed lines can be added with css. First, simplified document: \documentclass{article} \usepackage{nasser} \begin{document} \begin{multline*}% \begin{fourmatrix} A & B\\ C & D ...


13

It's very simple with the accents package: \documentclass[12pt]{article} \usepackage[utf8]{inputenc} \usepackage{accents} \newcommand\astered[1]{\accentset{\ast}{#1}} \begin{document} $ \astered{\i}\quad \astered{\imath}$ \boldmath $ \astered{\i}\quad \astered{\imath}$ \end{document}


21

Here's a “hand made i with asterisk”: \documentclass{article} \makeatletter \newcommand{\asti}{% \check@mathfonts \leavevmode {\ooalign{% \hidewidth \raisebox{.8ex}{\fontsize{\ssf@size}{0}\selectfont*}% \hidewidth\cr \i\cr }}% } \makeatother \begin{document} Here \asti s \asti t. \LARGE Here \asti s \asti t. \end{document} The ...


6

i⃰ or ı⃰ U+20F0 ‘Combining Asterisk Above’ after either i or dotless i (U+0131), since you’ve tagged your question with xetex, i.e. can use most of Unicode (if you have the right fonts, of which there seem to be few). \documentclass{scrartcl} \usepackage{fontspec,lmodern} \newcommand\testtext[2][i⃰ / ı⃰]{\noindent{#1 \hfill \textit{#1} \hfill \textbf{#1 ...


0

Just extracting the good parts from the existing answers and using them as follows. \documentclass{article} \usepackage{mathtools} \newcommand\ps[2][1]{\prescript{#1}{}{#2}} \begin{document} \equation \begin{split} X &= \ps[2]{\bar{x}} + \ps{z} \\ Y &= \ps{\bar{x}} + \ps[2]{z} + \ps[2]{\bar{w}}, \\ W &= \ps{y},\\ Z &= \ps{w}. \end{split} ...


2

I prefer one of these 3 variants, that use the amsmath environments (the second one, not very convincing here, might be of interest for longer formulae): \documentclass[preview,border=12pt]{standalone} \usepackage{mathtools} \begin{document} \section*{variant 1:} \begin{align*} \text{LHS} &= \begin{aligned}[t] c & + d\\ & +e + f +g ...


1

If you have the space for it (width) then I'd just use \documentclass{article} \usepackage{amssymb} \usepackage{amsmath} \let\set\mathbb \begin{document} \begin{equation*} \Lambda^{12}_{ee}=\Lambda^{21}_{ee}=\frac{64x_e}{75k_B}\sqrt{\frac{m_e}{2\pi k_BT_e}}\biggl[ \! \begin{aligned}[t] ...


1

I'm not sure to understand what you mean by “left aligning”; either you left align or center all equations. For the specific case, the formula is really difficult to split sensibly, so I propose a different strategy: \documentclass{article} \usepackage{amsmath} \usepackage{amssymb} \newcommand{\set}[1]{#1}%??? The definition was missing \begin{document} ...


0

A bit more about "c or not to c"... The inverse hyperbolic sine sinh^(-1)z (Beyer 1987, p. 181; Zwillinger 1995, p. 481), sometimes called the area hyperbolic sine (Harris and Stocker 1998, p. 264) and sometimes denoted arcsinhz (Jeffrey 2000, p. 124), is the multivalued function that is the inverse function of the hyperbolic sine. The variants Arcsinhz or ...


1

The prescripts are typeset in a better way by using the \prescript command from the mathtools package: \documentclass{article} \usepackage{mathtools} \begin{document} \begin{equation} \begin{aligned} X &= \prescript{2}{}{\bar{x}} + \prescript{1}{}{z}, \\ Y &= \prescript{1}{}{\bar{x}} + \prescript{2}{}{z} + \prescript{2}{}{\bar{w}}, \\ W ...


1

The main problem here is essentially the same as that in amsmath - bidi - siunitx possible bug? and Joseph Wrights solution there works here too. Additionally, you setting of the text in mathematics, in particular with ~, is not correct, producing error messages. Normally I would write such text chunks in \text, but in this situation you might choose the ...


5

Is this what you want? \documentclass{article} \usepackage{amsmath,graphicx} \newenvironment{smashedalign} {\par$\!\aligned} {\endaligned$\par} \begin{document} \begin{figure}[htp] \centering \includegraphics[height=2cm]{example-image-a.pdf} \begin{smashedalign} x &= 4 \times 5 \\ y &= x \end{smashedalign} ...


7

No, don't set negative values for \abovedisplayskip that will cause the math to over-print the preceding paragraph. The spurious white area is not vertical space added by align it is a blank horizontal line of a paragraph added by you by having a blank line before the display. This is not vertical space and is not dropped at the top of a page. Never leave ...


1

\documentclass{article} \usepackage{amsmath} \begin{document} \begin{equation} \begin{split} &X={}^ 2 \bar{x} + {}^ 1 z \\ &Y={}^ 1 \bar{x} + {}^ 2 z + {}^ 2 \bar{w} \\ &W= {}^ 1 y\\ &Z={}^ 1 w \end{split} \label{eq: logical 1} \end{equation} However probably better: \begin{equation} \begin{aligned} X&={}^ 2 \bar{x} + {}^ 1 z \\ ...


1

Here are two ways of obtaining what you're after: \documentclass{article} \usepackage{amsmath,array} \begin{document} \begin{equation} \begin{aligned} A & = B & \qquad C & = D \\ & = E & & = F \\ & = G & & = H \\[5mm] I & = J & K & = L \\ & = M & ...



Top 50 recent answers are included