Tag Info

New answers tagged

3

In my opinion you don't need the one liner sharing alignment with the four line display: they are separate by three lines of text and, moreover, the one liner is a general formula. However, there's no guesswork involved: just squash the material on the outside. \documentclass{article} \usepackage{mathtools} \newcommand{\LHS}[1]{\mathllap{#1}} ...


5

I don't know which package you need to use multialign, nor the purpose of that environment. I was able to reproduce the desired output with standard align environment, and without adding spaces with \. The macro \intertext (from amsmath) does the trick, but only for special cases such as the example you posted, in which the separate equations you want to ...


1

You could simply not use the \text{...} "wrapper" in the second argument of \DeclareMathOperator*} macro. Instead, just write \newcommand\myspacer{\quad} \DeclareMathOperator*{\minimize}{minimize\myspacer} \DeclareMathOperator*{\subjto}{subject\ to\myspacer} The macro \myspacer is set to \quad for now. If you wish to change it to \qquad or \, that's ...


4

You can set the problem in an array to adjust the spacing. For consistency, it's best to define this as an environment: \documentclass{article} \usepackage{amsmath,array,environ} \DeclareMathOperator*{\minimize}{\text{minimize}} \DeclareMathOperator*{\subjto}{\text{subject to}} \newcolumntype{R}{>{\displaystyle}r} ...


5

LaTeX by default uses scriptstyle for sums inside fractions. You can change the sums to displaystyle like this: \[ \langle \mu_{m} \rangle = \frac{{\displaystyle \sum_{-J}^{J}}{-g\mu_{\beta}M_{J}B.\exp{\left(\frac{-g\mu_{\beta}M_{J}B}{kT}\right)}}} {{\displaystyle \sum_{-J}^{J}}{\exp{\left(\frac{-g\mu_{\beta}M_{J}B}{kT}\right)}}} \] PLEASE, use \langle ...


4

\documentclass[preview,border=12pt,12pt]{standalone} % please change it back to your article class below %\documentclass[12pt]{article} \usepackage{amsmath} \begin{document} \abovedisplayskip=0pt\relax% don't use this line in your production \begin{align*} n & \propto \exp(-U/kT) \\ \Rightarrow \quad n &= A \exp(-U/kT) ...


8

Something like this. Put & right after n's. Update: commented by barbara beeton. Thanks. Code \documentclass[12pt]{article} \usepackage[paper size={10cm,3cm}]{geometry} \usepackage{amsmath} \begin{document} \begin{align} n& \propto \exp(-U/kT) \notag \\ \Rightarrow \quad n& = A \exp(-U/kT) \notag \end{align} \end{document}


2

Here's a solution with thmtools \documentclass{article} \usepackage{amsthm,amssymb,thmtools} \declaretheoremstyle[ spaceabove=6pt plus 6pt, spacebelow=6pt plus 6pt, headfont=\itshape, bodyfont=\normalfont, postheadspace={ }, qed=\protect\thisproofqed, ]{proof} \declaretheorem[ name=\protect\thisproofname, style=proof, numbered=no, ...


6

Here is a direct solution just using the AMS packages. We just set up a new environment, which is proof but containing a redefinition of the \qedsymbol. \documentclass{article} \usepackage{amsthm,amsmath,amssymb} \newcommand*{\myproofname}{My proof} ...


5

I also tend to use ntheorem as Bernard show. Just wanted to add how I'd do this with amsthm: \documentclass[a4paper]{memoir} \usepackage{amsthm} \newenvironment{proof*}[1][\proofname]{ \renewcommand\qedsymbol{\rule{3mm}{3mm}} \begin{proof}[#1]}{\end{proof}} \begin{document} \begin{proof} sfadf \end{proof} \begin{proof}[Proof of ...] sfadf ...


5

This is quite easy with the ntheorem package. Moreover, it manages correctly the placement of end-of-proof symbols when the proof ends in a displayed equation. I added the cleveref package to show how it manages reference types (if the cited theorem were to become a proposition, for instance, its reference would be changed accordingly): ...


5

From the amsmath user guide: The split environment is designed to serve as the entire body of an equation, or an entire line of an align or gather environment. There cannot be any printed material before or after it within the same enclosing structure. In particular, you can't have \left\{ to the left and \right. to the right of the split material. ...


0

As \raisetag doesn't seem to work properly here the align environment looks like a decent solution: \documentclass{article} \usepackage{mathtools} \begin{document} \begin{align} A = &\left( B \right. \notag \\ &\phantom{(} \left. + C \right) \end{align} \end{document}


1

I'd do something like this \documentclass{article} \usepackage{amsmath} \begin{document} \begin{align} A &= \Bigl( B \notag \\ &\phantom{= \Bigl(} + C \Bigr) \end{align} \end{document} or using split \documentclass{article} \usepackage{amsmath} \begin{document} \begin{equation} \begin{split} A &= \Bigl( B \\ ...


3

This is what you may need actually. \documentclass{article} \usepackage{mathtools} \begin{document} \begin{align*} I\left(a;\frac{1}{a}\right) &= I\left(\frac{1}{a};a\right) \\ I\left(a;\frac{1}{a}\right) &= -I\left(a;\frac{1}{a}\right) \\ \hbar I\left(a;\frac{1}{a}\right) &= 0 \end{align*} \end{document}


0

Thanks Andrew, that helped a lot! My final solution, for reference is (no section numbering, \g as environment shorthand): \documentclass[10pt,a4paper]{article} \usepackage{amsfonts} \usepackage[fleqn]{amsmath}%fleqn for align left \let\ul=\underline \newenvironment{Gather}[1]{\subsection*{\underline{#1}}% \minipage{\textwidth}\csname ...


3

You could try something like the following: \documentclass[10pt,a4paper]{article} \usepackage{amsfonts} \usepackage[fleqn]{amsmath}%fleqn for align left \let\ul=\underline \newenvironment{Gather}[1]{\subsection{\underline{#1}}% \minipage{\textwidth}\csname gather*\endcsname} {\csname endgather*\endcsname \endminipage} \begin{document} ...


3

According to page 58 of the TeXBook: TeX will not deal with dimensions whose absolute value is 230 sp or more. In other words, the maximum legal dimension is slightly less than 16384 pt. This is a distance of about 18.892 feet (5.7583 meters), so it won’t cramp your style. Your overfull hboxes are no larger than 9000pt, so a width of around ...


4

shamelessly stealing the code from @Mico, and second-handedly from @egreg, here is a small adaptation that has the descriptions of the steps left-aligned, which i think is what the question is really asking for. i have added one step, which takes the math content of the first line of the alignment as an argument, and forces that line to a fixed width, which ...


4

Assuming you want to use the multialign environment that was defined by @egreg in an answer to your posting How to Align systems, all you need to do is to rearrange some of the & alignment symbols. Observe that one must not have all-blank lines in an align environment (or one, such as multialign, that's derived from align and friends). Separately, I ...


6

If you want to carry over the alignment, the easiest way is to define your own environment: \documentclass{article} \usepackage[pass,showframe]{geometry} % just to show the page margins \usepackage{amsmath} \makeatletter \newenvironment{multialign} % a copy of flalign* {\setcounter{multialign}{0}% ...


1

\documentclass[preview,border=12pt,12pt]{standalone} % disable this line and change to the article below. %\documentclass[12pt]{article} \usepackage{amsmath} \usepackage{enumitem} \setlist[enumerate,1]{itemsep=12pt,label=\textbf{\arabic*.},start=9} \begin{document} \begin{enumerate} % One ---------------- \item $\! \begin{aligned}[t] x-2x+4-6x &= ...


5

Converting my comment into an answer: If centering of a group of equations is required, with no particular alignment, the gather environment (or its starred, unnumbered variant, gather*) should be used: \documentclass{article} \usepackage{amsmath} \begin{document} \begin{gather*} \hat{W}_i =\sum_{j\neq i} \hat{G}_j \tag{lsys} \\ \hat{G}_i ...


3

The ellipsis package does \AtBeginDocument{% \DeclareRobustCommand{\dots}{% \ifmmode\mathellipsis\else\expandafter\textellipsis\fi}% } which is wrong, because it reinstates the LaTeX kernel definition without taking into account that other package might have redefined it. The package author's aim is ensuring that in text mode the redefined ...


0

This is a solution I used some time ago. It adds \ellipsisbeforegap and \ellipsisaftergap just because I needed it. You can delete it. \documentclass{scrartcl} \usepackage{mathtools} \usepackage{ellipsis} \makeatletter \renewcommand*{\mathellipsis}{% \mathinner{% \kern\ellipsisbeforegap% {\ldotp}\kern\ellipsisgap% ...


7

\normallineskiplimit (and friends) are used in two places in latex, they are used in \@arrayparboxrestore \lineskip\normallineskip \baselineskip\normalbaselineskip so that inside \parbox and minipage and tabular p columns the baselineskip is restored to a normal state even if used in a context where they ave non standard values. \displaylines ...


1

Here's another difference I notice. According to the AMS User Guide (p. 6 and p. 29 in the Version 2.0 copy I have): The split structure should constitute the entire body of the enclosing struc- ture, apart from commands like \label that produce no visible material. The split environment is designed to serve as the entire body of an equation, or ...


4

You've not understood that to have two alignment groups, you need three &. I replaced amsmath with mathtools (which loads the former), in order to use the \mathclap command, to have better horizontal spacing around the (aligned) Σ's. \documentclass{article} \usepackage[utf8]{inputenc} \usepackage[T1]{fontenc} \usepackage{geometry} ...


4

One important difference is that split obeys to the centertags (default) or tbtags option. Here is an example \documentclass[twocolumn]{article} \usepackage[ % tbtags, % leqno, ]{amsmath} \begin{document} \begin{align} a&=b\\ \begin{split} c&=d+{}\\ &=e+{}\\ &=f \end{split}\\ g&=h \end{align} \end{document} Now the same with ...


3

The drawback of this solution is that the line is thickened, but the advantage is that it will work even if the equation gets "really really big". Here. I vertically auto-stretch a / to make the tall slash of any required height, but add width if necessary so that the overall aspect ratio of the stretched glyph can not exceed 500% (i.e., 5:1). ...


3

For example: \documentclass{article} \begin{document} \[ a=\textrm{\Huge VERYBIGSTUFF} \Biggm/ \textrm{\Huge VERYBIGSTUFF} \] or (compare the spacing) \[ a=\textrm{\Huge VERYBIGSTUFF} \Bigg/ \textrm{\Huge VERYBIGSTUFF} \] In a real situation it would look nicer: \Huge \[ a=\textrm{\Huge VERYBIGSTUFF} \Biggm/ \textrm{\Huge VERYBIGSTUFF} \] or ...


4

I'll present two possible solutions. Don't close the center environment “Abuse” the gather* environment At the top is the rendering with your input. Note that I removed underlining, which is frowned upon by typographers. Instead of \textbf you can also use \textit. \documentclass{article} \usepackage{amsmath} \begin{document} ...


2

You can load the nccmath package. I tried, thinking of using its \useshortskip command and discovered that just loading it works. Note that it loads amsmath, so that you can load it instead of amsmath. It doesn't load mathtools (recommended extension of amsmath), though: \documentclass{article} \usepackage{mathtools} \usepackage{nccmath} \begin{document} ...


1

It's the center environment not playing well with gather*: \documentclass{article} \usepackage{amsmath} \begin{document} \begin{center} \underline{First set of identities.} \[x+x = x\] \end{center}% \begin{center} \underline{Second set.} \begin{gather*} 0+x = x, \quad x+0 = 0 \\ (x+y)+z = x+(y+z) \end{gather*} ...


0

using https://github.com/loveencounterflow/cxltx-styles#cxltx-style-accentbox, you could simply write the following: \documentclass[a4paper,12pt]{book} \usepackage{cxltx-style-accentbox} \begin{document} \textit{Some variations with an asterisk placed above an `i':} i\upaccent{\tiny *}{\i}i\upaccent{\tiny *}{\i}i\upaccent{\tiny *}{\i} ...


1

I don't have a solution for easybmat support, but in your particular case you can simplify your code and use different, supported by tex4ht, matrix environment . dashed lines can be added with css. First, simplified document: \documentclass{article} \usepackage{nasser} \begin{document} \begin{multline*}% \begin{fourmatrix} A & B\\ C & D ...


13

It's very simple with the accents package: \documentclass[12pt]{article} \usepackage[utf8]{inputenc} \usepackage{accents} \newcommand\astered[1]{\accentset{\ast}{#1}} \begin{document} $ \astered{\i}\quad \astered{\imath}$ \boldmath $ \astered{\i}\quad \astered{\imath}$ \end{document}


21

Here's a “hand made i with asterisk”: \documentclass{article} \makeatletter \newcommand{\asti}{% \check@mathfonts \leavevmode {\ooalign{% \hidewidth \raisebox{.8ex}{\fontsize{\ssf@size}{0}\selectfont*}% \hidewidth\cr \i\cr }}% } \makeatother \begin{document} Here \asti s \asti t. \LARGE Here \asti s \asti t. \end{document} The ...


6

i⃰ or ı⃰ U+20F0 ‘Combining Asterisk Above’ after either i or dotless i (U+0131), since you’ve tagged your question with xetex, i.e. can use most of Unicode (if you have the right fonts, of which there seem to be few). \documentclass{scrartcl} \usepackage{fontspec,lmodern} \newcommand\testtext[2][i⃰ / ı⃰]{\noindent{#1 \hfill \textit{#1} \hfill \textbf{#1 ...



Top 50 recent answers are included