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2

Or the Heiko Oberdiek version... contains a lot of logos you might need. % arara: pdflatex \documentclass{article} \usepackage{hologo} \begin{document} \hologo{AmSLaTeX} \end{document} Or you just type: \documentclass{article} \usepackage{lmodern} \begin{document} $\cal A$\kern-.1667em\lower.5ex\hbox{$\cal M$}\kern-.125em$\cal S$-\TeX \end{document} ...


2

\documentclass{article} \usepackage{amsmath} \begin{document} \AmS-\LaTeX \end{document}


3

Try: \documentclass{article} \usepackage{amsmath} \begin{document} Short version: \AmS-\LaTeX\par Manual version: \makeatletter {\AmSfont A\kern -.1667em\lower .5ex\hbox {M}\kern -.125emS}-L\kern -.36em{\sbox \z@ T\vbox to\ht \z@ {\hbox {\check@mathfonts \fontsize \sf@size \z@ \math@fontsfalse \selectfont A}\vss }}\kern -.15emT\kern -.1667em\lower ...


3

I'm not really sure your readers will be happy: \documentclass{article} \usepackage{amsmath} \usepackage{environ} \usepackage{lipsum} \makeatletter \NewEnviron{shortequation}{% \sbox\z@{\let\label\@gobble$\displaystyle\BODY$}% \parbox{\dimexpr\wd\z@+4em}{ \vspace{-\baselineskip} \begin{gather} \BODY \end{gather} ...


0

\documentclass{article} \usepackage{amsmath} \begin{document} \begin{gather} \begin{aligned} b& = a, &&& d&=c\\ f&=e, &&& h&=g \end{aligned} \end{gather} \end{document}


5

Completely new update: % arara: pdflatex \documentclass{article} \usepackage{mathtools} \AtBeginDocument{\providecommand*\colonequiv{\vcentcolon\mspace{-1.2mu}\equiv}} \begin{document} \[A\colonequiv B\] %\[A\coloneqq B\] % for prove of consistency %\[A\coloneq B\] \end{document} Old version (I believe, misunderstood): Super hacky, but it works: ...


6

yet another answer, taking advantage of some additional possibilities from mathools: \documentclass[12pt]{article} \usepackage{mathtools} \begin{document} \begin{equation} \begin{alignedat}{2} Q_\nu(a,b) &= \frac{1}{2}\mathrm{erfc}\left ( \frac{b+a}{\sqrt2} \right )+\frac{1}{2}\mathrm{erfc}\left ( \frac{b-a}{\sqrt2} \right ) \\ & \quad ...


1

A different solution: \documentclass[12pt]{article} \usepackage{amsmath} \begin{document} \begin{multline} Q_{\nu}(a,b) = \frac{1}{2} \, \mathrm{erfc}\left( \frac{b+a}{\sqrt2} \right) + \frac{1}{2} \, \mathrm{erfc}\left( \frac{b-a}{\sqrt2} \right)\\ \quad + \frac{1}{a\sqrt{2\pi}} \, \sum_{k=0}^{\nu-\frac{3}{2}} \frac{b^{2k}}{2^k} \, ...


1

The following is close to what is being sought. \documentclass[12pt]{article} \usepackage{amsmath} \begin{document} \begin{align} Q_{\nu}(a,b) &= \frac{1}{2} \, \mathrm{erfc}\left( \frac{b+a}{\sqrt2} \right) + \frac{1}{2} \, \mathrm{erfc}\left( \frac{b-a}{\sqrt2} \right) \nonumber \\ & \quad + \frac{1}{a\sqrt{2\pi}} \, ...


3

You can use cancel package. \documentclass[a4paper,10pt]{scrartcl} \usepackage{amsmath,amssymb,cancel} \begin{document} What part of \begin{align*} \mathcal{L} &= - \frac{1}{4} F_{\mu \nu} F^{\mu \nu} \\ &\phantom{{}=}+ i \bar{\psi} \cancel{D} \psi + h.c. \\ &\phantom{{}=}+ \bar{\psi}_i y_{ij} \psi_j \phi + h.c. \\ ...


4

Not sure what this is for. The trick is to add \setcounter{equation}{0} to all the relevant structures. \documentclass{article} \usepackage{amsmath} \usepackage{etoolbox} \preto\equation{\setcounter{equation}{0}} \makeatletter \pretocmd\start@gather{\setcounter{equation}{0}}{}{} \pretocmd\start@align{\setcounter{equation}{0}}{}{} ...


4

This is a side effect of the setting \delimiterfactor=901 and \delimiterfactor=5pt; the (ordinary) matrix environments of amsmath are based on array that circumvents the problem by adding a strut to every line. This is not really possible with smallmatrix, where one wants, for rows, as small a height as possible. Here's a psmallmatrix environment that ...


3

Too me the size of the brackets is fine, they don't quite cover the content, but on the other hand smallmatrix is trying to save vertical space for you. You can get larger brackets by adding a \strut or two in the content, but this causes bad space. Struts are just rules of zero width with height and depth, better here is to use one without depth, e.g. ...


2

This code snippet doesn't bring a double superscript error. align is not used, also no alignment marker &. However, \r would bring an error, I guess you (re)defined it you should not use \textbf{\theta} in math context. Instead, use \boldsymbol of amsmath. It even works for bold Greek letters. You should use \sin for the sine operator, so it would be ...


1

You might want to give a try to the esvect package, which has 8 nice arrow shapes, loner than the arrow that comes with vec. The base command is \vv, and there is a \vv* command for vectors with indices, in order to have a correct spacing between vector and index: \documentclass{article} \usepackage{siunitx} \usepackage[e]{esvect} \begin{document} ...


4

As far I have understood the math in the question, the vector is p, the remaining part is just an index to the vector. Therefore, a short vector would be sufficient as shown in the following example. I do not know about e, s2, and d7, but 10 Hz is clearly a number with unit, typeset upright, as already shown in the question and correctly done via ...


6

Here is a solution, based on blkarray, multirow and \bigstrut: \documentclass{book} \usepackage{amsmath, bm} \usepackage{blkarray, multirow, bigstrut} \newcommand\mystrut[1][0.6ex]{\setlength\bigstrutjot{#1}{\bigstrut[t]}} \usepackage{bm} \begin{document} \[ \bm{O}_4(2\phi) = \begin{bmatrix} \!\!\!\begin{blockarray}{c c c c} 1 & 0 & 0 & 0 ...


8

You can, with some tricks: \documentclass{article} \usepackage{amsmath} \begin{document} \[ \boldsymbol{O}_{4}(2\phi)= \begin{bmatrix} 1 & \mspace{-12mu} \begin{matrix} 0 & 0 & 0 \end{matrix} \\ \begin{matrix} 0 \\ 0 \\ 0 \end{matrix} & \mspace{-12mu} \begin{bmatrix} \vphantom{\begin{matrix} 0 \\ 0 \\ 0 \end{matrix}} ...


7

You can use a phantom so the underbrace is below the whole construction. I used equation*, which is better (and simpler) if no alignment is involved. Most important, I used pmatrix instead of array, that gives better spacing of the parentheses. \documentclass{article} \usepackage{IEEEtrantools} \usepackage{amsmath} \begin{document} \begin{equation*} ...


7

My reaction to the screenshot you posted wasn't, "the underbrace is too close to the matrix." Instead, my reactions were, "the line spacing inside the vectors and matrices is much too tight" and "the text below the underbrace should be set on two lines". Given that your example doesn't make much use of the facilities of the IEEEeqnarray environment, I've ...


12

Here, I just add 6pt of vertical "stack gap" around the matrix. \documentclass{article} \usepackage{IEEEtrantools,stackengine} \stackMath \usepackage{amsmath} \begin{document} \begin{IEEEeqnarray*}{rClCl} \left( \begin{array}{c} f\frac{X}{Z} \\ f\frac{Y}{Z}\\ 1 \end{array} \right) & \sim & \left( ...


0

I also created a Perl script to handle those: #!/usr/bin/perl use strict; use warnings; my $inBlockDel=0; my $inBlockAdd=0; open(FILE,$ARGV[0]) or die "cannot open ".$ARGV[0]; while(my $line = <FILE>){ chomp($line); if($line =~ /^\\DIFdelbegin \%DIFDELCMD < \\begin{equation}/){ print " \\begin{displaymath}\n \\DIFdel{"; ...


3

It's a known bug of the Latin Modern fonts, which only supply the lmex font (extensible symbols) at a fixed size. \documentclass[25pt, a0paper, portrait]{tikzposter} \usepackage[utf8]{inputenc} \usepackage{graphicx} \usepackage[T1]{fontenc} \usepackage{lmodern} \usepackage{amsmath} \usepackage{amssymb} % declare `cmex` to be arbitrary scalable ...


0

The trouble is caused by the spaces between the \frac command and its arguments. You can use option --allow-spaces, which will ignore spaces between commands their arguments (as recognised by the curly braces). This can have side-effects, though, as sometimes this option can cause inappropriate association if a block occurs after an argumentless command.


4

Euler is not really compatible with Computer Modern, it's better with Palatino, in my opinion. As a rule, the operator names such as sine, cosine and logarithm are typeset with the normal (upright) text font, in order not to be confused with products of quantities: “sin” does not mean the product “s by i by n”. \documentclass[border=2]{standalone} ...


3

Using the aligned environment instead of split there is no problem, especially if you add the geometry package: \documentclass[a4paper]{book} \usepackage{geometry} \usepackage{amsmath} \begin{document} \begin{align} T_4 &= \langle \underline{k}\,.\,\underline{k}^{*^T} \rangle= \left\langle \begin{bmatrix} \left|k_1\right|^2 & k_1k_2^* ...


3

\documentclass[a4paper]{book} \usepackage{amsmath} \begin{document} {\setlength{\arraycolsep}{1.5pt} $\begin{array}{rclc} T_4 &=& \langle \underline{k}\,.\,\underline{k}^{*^T} \rangle= \left\langle \begin{bmatrix} \left|k_1\right|^2 & k_1k_2^* & k_1k_3^* & k_1k_4^*\\ k_2k_1^* & \left|k_2\right|^2 & k_2k_3^* & k_2k_4^*\\ ...


3

If you want a 1 to 1 replica of this, it would look like: % arara: pdflatex \documentclass[a4paper]{book} \usepackage{amsmath} \begin{document} \[ % or \begin{equation} if you want it numberd. \begin{split} \left[\begin{matrix} . & . &\\ . & . & \cdots\cdots\\ . & . & \cdots\cdots\\ . & . & \end{matrix}\right.\\ ...


1

You want alignat: \documentclass{article} \usepackage{amsmath} \begin{document} You want \begin{alignat}{2} Z_i(f) &= R_i(f) && + i \cdot X_i(f) \label{eq:Zi} \\ Z_R(f) &= R && + i \cdot 0 \label{eq:ZR} \\ Z_L(f) &= 0 && + i \cdot \underbrace{ 2 \pi f L }_{X_L} \label{eq:ZL} \\ Z_C(f) &= 0 && ...


6

\if@display is a single token, not \if @display it is defined and documented as follows in amsmath: % The straightforward \cs{ifinner} test to see if the current math % context is non-display, fails if, for instance, we are typesetting % a multiline display within an \cs{halign}, with the pieces going % into constructions like % ...


2

I use this macro in many of my papers: \renewcommand{\vec}[1]{\boldsymbol{\mathrm{#1}}} It can always be commented out, of course, if the original definition is preferred.


11

First, I have to recall that \bf is a plain TeX macro. It is not bad practice to use it but it isn't needed anymore since \bfseries was intoduced with LaTeX and its syntax is exactly the same as for good old \bf. Second, don't change your markup! (by exploiting a search and replace routine). If you wrote \vec in your manuscript you did it because the ...


5

First, {\bf ...} is obsolete. Instead it you should use \mathbf{...} or \boldsymbol, depending on which packages you use. For replacing you have two possibilities: By means of the editor the 'Replace' function replaces \vec{ with for example mathbf{. Redefine \vec with \renewcommand (this gives easy way to change your mind again ...:) )


9

The proper way of doing this would be to use a search-and-replace command in your text editor in connection with a custom macro, e.g. \myvec. However, if you insist on having a quick solution inside your document (which I discourage), you could add the following to your document's preamble: \let\oldvec=\vec \renewcommand{\vec}[1]{\oldvec{\mathbf{#1}}} If ...


12

You could change meaning of \vec, but that would be very bad pratice. What I would do: Define new command with style like: \newcommand{\vectorstyle}[1]{\mathbf{#1}} Use Find and Replace feature of your text editor/IDE to replace \vec{ for \vectorstyle{ In the event of next chage, just replace the definiton of the \vectorstyle P.S. Do not use \bf. It's ...


2

You can add this to your preamble : \makeatletter \def\partrunhead#1#2#3{% \@ifnotempty{#2}{{\@ifnotempty{#1}{#1 }}\@ifnotempty{#3}{}}#3} \let\chapterrunhead\partrunhead \let\sectionrunhead\partrunhead \makeatother (Short) Explanation : I searched into gsm-l.cls which commands were responsible for the page headers, and found that it was \partrunhead. ...



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