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24

You can always contact your local TeX users group. They most likely know people that offer LaTeX help (free/commercial). For the other question, on how much it would be. That depends, of course, but since you're asking for special knowledge, it won't be cheap. I see you are located in Germany: we maintain a list of professional TeX consultants here: ...


18

As far as I understand your question, you need someone who has expertise on both bidi typesetting in TeX and critical edition typesetting in TeX. You may contact these people/groups/mailing lists and see if they can help (or be hired): Peter Wilson (the original author of ledmac, ledpar, and ledarab packages) Dominik Wujastyk and John Lavagnino (the ...


16

As promised in the comment above, the new version of the XITS font has preliminary RTL support. There is a simple ConTeXt test file in the repository (you need a recent ConTeXt MkIV version) but it shouldn't be hard to port it to LuaLaTeX and unicode-math package. It is work in progress, not all symbols have been mirrored and support for the proposed Arabic ...


15

I usually use XeLaTeX with Polyglossia. A quick example: \documentclass{book} \usepackage{setspace} \usepackage{fontspec} \usepackage{polyglossia} \setmainlanguage{english} \setotherlanguage{arabic} \newfontfamily\arabicfont[Script=Arabic,Scale=1.1]{Scheherazade} \begin{document} Some latin text and inline arabic: \textarabic{السلام عليكم} And for ...


13

In general, I advise against using bold and slanted in Arabic for emphasis: they work poorly in Arabic, especially the slant which is not always as visible and is quite alien to Arabic typesetting traditions. (Even though my own Amiri font has them, they are there to avoid the fake bold and slanted synthesized by GUI applications which are very very poor and ...


12

Using XeTeX or LuaTeX, with Unicode input and a font with proper support (e.g. Scheherazade), things should be as simple as: \documentclass{article} \usepackage{fontspec} \usepackage{bidi} \newfontfamily\ottoman[Script=Arabic]{Scheherazade} \begin{document} \begin{RTL} \ottoman لسان عثمانی \end{RTL} \end{document}


11

There have been a couple of articles in TUGboat specifically on the Oriental TeX project, by Idris Hamid: Oriental TeX: A new direction in scholarly complex-script typesetting Qur'ānic typography comes of age: Æsthetics, layering, and paragraph optimization in ConTeXt An article by Azzeddine Lazrek, RyDArab — Typesetting Arabic mathematical expressions ...


9

It is because some works is in progress specially for the bidi package, on the other hand I am waiting for some of luatex bidi bugs getting fixed. you can test things if you want: \documentclass{article} \usepackage{fontspec} \setmainfont[Script=Arabic]{font-name} \usepackage{bidi} \pagedir TRT\pardir TRT\bodydir TRT\textdir TRT \begin{document} %your ...


9

The following is not a direct answer to the question, since it is more focused on Unicode than on TeX.But I think it is relevant nevertheless, specially with XeLaTeX, and has probably to be kept in mind if someone want to write a package for Arabic mathematical typesetting. Unicode has encoded unicode 6.1 ( January 2012) a set of Arabic Mathematical Symbols ...


9

A workaround is to insert Zero Width Joiner character around the text break area, this would force final/initial forms. For most fonts with should be OK, though it would break contextual alternates in more advanced fonts, but the text should still be readable. Other than that, there is no way to switch color without breaking text into two parts in XeTeX. ...


7

You just need to redefine \thepage to switch to the latin font. Based on Vafa's comment to egreg's answer, this should be done with: \renewcommand{\thepage}{\texorpdfstring{\lr{\arabic{page}}}{\arabic{page}}}


7

Two days ago Khaled Hosny sent me this: \documentclass{article} \usepackage{fontspec} \setmainfont[Ligatures=TeX]{Junicode} \newfontfamily\arabicfont [Script=Arabic, % to get correct arabic shaping Scale=1.2] % make the arabic font bigger, a matter of taste {Scheherazade} % whatever Arabic font you like ...


7

Although I am no expert in LaTeX and Arabic typesetting, I have had some experience in using Arabic and Persian in TeX environment, that I can share. I have tried arabi and babel in the past, it worked out well, however, I had problems with fonts. Then, as most people would do, I switched to XeLaTeX (or XeTeX, I'm not sure which one means what, I use it ...


7

You can use the tabbing environment; below there are some examples (the example is in Spanish, but that's not so relevant) of the use of this environment and a brief description of its main commands: \documentclass{article} \begin{document} \begin{tabbing} Programa\quad \= : \= \TeX \\ Autor \> : \> Donald Knuth \\ Manuales \> : \\ \qquad\= The ...


6

Using LaTeX you can use arabtex with the setfarsi option. You will need to use transliterations for the input (much like pinyin in Chinese). Here is a minimal: \documentstyle[12pt,arabtex]{article} \parindent=0pt \begin{document} \null \vskip -2cm \setfarsi \novocalize \Large % \begin{arabtext} a b c d e f g h \\ 0123456789\\ donald knuth pasha\\ ...


6

No, you can’t. XeTeX processes each word in isolation and does not apply the BiDi algorithm to the whole paragraph. It is possible to use interchar classes to do very primitive BiDi processing, but it is too limited to be reliable (because the nature of BiDi handling and the fact interchar classes were not meant for such use cases). P.S. I have a Bidi ...


6

The dot can be removed using the glossaries package option nopostdot. The Missing \endcsname inserted error is because you're trying to use \textarabic{...} as a label, but the label must be plain text. I don't have the required fonts installed, so I can't fully test it, but try the following: \documentclass[twocolumn]{article} \usepackage{fontspec} ...


6

Very simple. I do it like this: \usepackage{bidi}% this should be the last package to load. \newfontfamily\Kayhan[Script=Arabic]{XB Kayhan}% for example \newenvironment{Farsi}%more human readable - other stuff can be added as well {\begin{RTL}} {\end{RTL}} Then just write farsi like this: This is an english paragraph with some \begin{Farsi}\Kayhan نوشته ...


6

The \textarab command changes internally the category code of _, so that it's not any more the subscript character for math formulas, but only in the argument of \textarab. However, this change is not any more possible if the argument has already been read (in this case as argument to \place). You have two strategies available. Strategy 1 \begin{document} ...


6

I assume by “Hindi numbers” you mean eastern Arabic numerals, in this case you can use numerals=maghrib option as explained in §5.1 of pologlossia manual. You shouldn’t also be using Mapping=arabicdigits font option, as it has the exact same effect you don’t want (and Amiri does not have old style numbers yet, so that option has no effect). ...


5

Use polyglossia instead of arabxetex and set the main document language to Arabic and the secondary language to English, for English text you will now have to use \textenglish instead of textLR. Refer to pologlossia documentation for more details. \documentclass[a4paper,12pt]{article} \usepackage[pdfauthor={Yousef Raffa},pdftitle={Translation of The ARRL ...


5

This seems to be due to an incompatibility between TikZ and babel with the arabic option. It can be rectified reasonably easily, though. To make TikZ work in a document that's using babel with the arabic option, the tikzpicture environment needs to be in an english environment. To automatically switch to english, you can put \usepackage{etoolbox} ...


5

The answer might be too late but for anyone else who might have the same problem.. You need just to put tikz package before setting languages: \usepackage{setspace} \usepackage{fontspec} \usepackage{polyglossia} \usepackage{tikz} \usepackage{etoolbox} \setmainlanguage{arabic} \setotherlanguage{english} ...


5

You can redefine the plain page style: \makeatletter \def\ps@plain{% \let\@mkboth\@gobbletwo \let\@oddhead\@empty \def\@oddfoot{\reset@font\hfil\lr{\arabic{page}}\hfil}% \let\@evenhead\@empty \let\@evenfoot\@oddfoot} \makeatother \pagestyle{plain} A less intimidating way is obtained with fancyhdr: \usepackage{fancyhdr} % must go before bidipoem ...


5

I don't know about typesetting arabic, but I did watch this presentation by Idris Hamid from TUG 2010 about a project called Oriental TeX, and remember being rather impressed by it. I understood it is using ConTeXt mkIV and LuaTeX.


5

If you don't mind switching to another engine, the following should work with XeTeX (xelatex) and you get access to any Arabic OpenType font: \documentclass[a4paper,oneside,12pt]{memoir} \usepackage{polyglossia} \setmainlanguage{english} \setotherlanguage{arabic} \newfontfamily\arabicfont[Script=Arabic]{Amiri} % or any other font \begin{document} ...


5

Without a minimal example, I don’t know why you’re experiencing difficulties. But with an up-to-date TeX Live, this example (adapted from the minimal example in the arabxetex documentation) works. Perhaps the voc or fullvoc options are what you need? If not, perhaps the font you’re using isn’t up to the task. \documentclass[12pt]{article} ...


5

One of solution is this. first define your listingstyle like this before \begin{document} If your main Language is persian then: \documentclass[11pt]{book} \usepackage{listings} \usepackage{xepersian} \lstdefinestyle{MyXML}{ language=XML, escapeinside={\%*}{*)}, morekeywords={encoding, ...


4

The proper, high level, commands for setting text direction in ConTeXt are \setupalign and \setupdirections (they are “experimental” though). \definefont[hebrewfont][dejavusans at 12 pt] \setupalign[r2l] \setupdirections[bidi=global] \starttext \hebrewfont שלום (אני) כותב\\ \stoptext For my personal work I use the context-bidi module (wrote myself, even ...


4

There are many different issues raised in the question, and there is no single resource which covers all of them. For example, typesetting Arabic is a very different matter from understanding the difference between LaTeX and ConTeXt or how to generate web content in a TeX-based workflow. As such, you probably need to ask focussed questions on the issues you ...



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