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4

This uses a stacking approach. This answer is helping me to think of ways to automate dotted/dashed lines as part of stacks, which in this MWE, had to be done very manually. \documentclass{article} \usepackage[usestackEOL]{stackengine} \usepackage{graphicx} \stackMath % DASHED LINE OF SPECIFIED LENGTH % From morsburg at ...


6

Since revtex4 seems to be incompatible with the arydshln package, here's an option using TikZ: \documentclass[aps,prl,twocolumn,nofootinbib,superscriptaddress,floatfix]{revtex4} \usepackage{tikz} \usetikzlibrary{matrix} \begin{document} \[ \Biggl(\mkern-5mu \begin{tikzpicture}[baseline=-.65ex] \matrix[ matrix of math nodes, column sep=1ex, ] (m) { B ...


9

You can adjust the dash and gap of the \hdashline by modifying the lengths \dashlinedash and \dashlinegap: \documentclass{article} \usepackage{tabularx} \usepackage{arydshln,leftidx,mathtools} \setlength{\dashlinedash}{.4pt} \setlength{\dashlinegap}{.8pt} \begin{document} \[ \leftidx{_{m-r}^{\phantom{m-r}\llap{$\scriptstyle r$}}}{\left( ...


2

Here is a reworking of what you want to achieve using amsmath's aligned environment: \documentclass{article} \usepackage{amsmath}% http://ctan.org/pkg/amsmath \newcommand{\pfrac}[2][]{\frac{\partial #1}{\partial #2}}% \pfrac[<top>]{<bottom>} \begin{document} \begin{equation} \begin{aligned} \nabla \cdot F &= \biggl( \pfrac{x}i + ...


1

You should try \dfrac{}{} instead of \frac{}{}. Include the amsmath package. The "d" stands for displaysize(or style), you can of course do a \displaystyle on every symbol, but that would be too clumsy. EDIT: Corrected on Steven B. Segletes suggestion.


2

Here is a plain TeX version. I'm not saying this is better in anyway, it's just to show you what can be done with an old fashioned \halign. Note that on the left I've used \openup to increase the line spacing and a \strut to make the left brace more "inclusive"; compare to the cramped version on the right without them. Obviously you'd make them the same ...


1

It's much simpler than what you did : use the cases environment: \documentclass[12pt,a4paper,bothsides]{article} \usepackage[utf8]{inputenc} \usepackage[showframe, nomarginpar]{geometry} \usepackage{mathtools} \begin{document} \[ \begin{cases} \omega_{s}^{-} = 8.43 \\ \omega_{s}^{+} = 4.43 \\ ...


1

\begin{equation*} \begin{cases} \omega_{s}^{-} = 8.43 \\ \omega_{s}^{+} = 4.43 \\ \omega_{c}^{-} = -500\\ \omega_{c}^{+} = 500\\ \end{cases} \qquad\implies\qquad \begin{cases} \Omega_{s}^{-} = 9 \\ \Omega_{s}^{+} = 5 \\ \Omega_{c}^{-} = -1\\ ...


6

It's much simpler if you use amsmath: \documentclass{article} \usepackage{amsmath} \begin{document} \[ \left\{ \begin{aligned} \omega_{s}^{-} &= 8.43 \\ \omega_{s}^{+} &= 4.43 \\ \omega_{c}^{-} &= -500\\ \omega_{c}^{+} &= 500\\ \end{aligned} \right. \qquad\Longrightarrow\qquad \left\{ \begin{aligned} \Omega_{s}^{-} &= 9 \\ ...


1

There are many ways, one of them: \documentclass{article} \usepackage{amsmath} \usepackage{array} \begin{document} \[ \left\{ \begin{array}{@{}l@{}>{{}}l@{}} \omega_s^- &= 8.43 \\ \omega_s^+ &= 4.43 \\ \omega_c^- &= -500 \\ \omega_c^+ &= 500 \end{array} \right.\kern-\nulldelimiterspace \quad \Rightarrow ...


4

Please test the code before posting, your code had multiple errors ! LaTeX Error: Illegal character in array arg. ! Extra alignment tab has been changed to \cr. ! Too many }'s. ! LaTeX Error: \begin{document} ended by \end{figure}. So I had to guess fixes for those to guess the problem that you were actually facing which is that you had put the brace ...


4

You're not supposed to have a tabular inside the longtable, the column specification should be added directly to the longtable. \documentclass{article} \usepackage{hyperref} % The hy­per­ref pack­age is used to han­dle cross-ref­er­enc­ing com­mands in LATEX to pro­duce hy­per­text links in the doc­u­ment. \usepackage[margin=0.5in]{geometry} ...


2

The blkarray package could be a solution. However it has some drawbacks, in particular, the array won't be centred and you'll have to make some manual adjustment. The curly braces are vertically aligned. \documentclass[11pt]{book} \usepackage[utf8]{inputenc} \usepackage[showframe, nomarginpar, textwidth = 15cm]{geometry} \usepackage{amsmath} ...


4

The following code borrows from How do I put a side brace around several lines in the align* environment? % arara: pdflatex % !arara: indent: {overwrite: yes} \documentclass{article} \usepackage{amsmath} \begin{document} \begin{equation} \begin{array}{r@{\;}l} \setlength{\jot}{4.5pt} y_{it} & = \alpha_i + v_i \times P_t ...


3

You must use \DeclareExpandableDocumentCommand: \documentclass[a4paper]{report} \usepackage{multirow,xparse} \ExplSyntaxOn \DeclareExpandableDocumentCommand{\multi}{oom} { \IfNoValueTF{#2} { \IfNoValueTF{#1} { \errmessage{Too few arguments} \errhelp{You must specify either the number of columns or that of rows but not neither.} ...


4

\documentclass[12pt,a4paper,bothsides]{article} \usepackage[utf8]{inputenc} \usepackage[showframe, nomarginpar]{geometry} \usepackage{mathtools} \DeclarePairedDelimiter{\norm}{\lVert}{\rVert} \begin{document} \begin{align*} \min_{W, S}J(W,S) & =\frac{\sum^n_{i,j=1}\norm{W^{T}(x_{i}-x_{j})}^2 S_{ij}}{\sum^n_{i=1}\norm{W^Tx_{i}}^2}+μ \norm{S}^2 \\ ...


2

This seems to make what you want: \documentclass[12pt,a4paper,bothsides]{article} \usepackage[utf8]{inputenc} \usepackage[showframe, nomarginpar]{geometry} \usepackage{mathtools} \DeclarePairedDelimiter{\norm}{\lVert}{\rVert} \begin{document} \begin{align*} \min_{W, S}J(W,S) & ...


0

\begin{eqnarray} \min_{W, S}J(W,S)=\frac{\sum^n_{i,j=1} \rVert{W^{T}(x_{i}-x_{j})\rVert}^2S_{ij}}{\sum^n_{i=1}\rVert{W^Tx_{i}}\rVert^2}+\mu \rVert{S}\rVert^2 \nonumber \end{eqnarray} \hspace{50mm}such that, \begin{eqnarray} W^TW=I \nonumber \\ \sum^n_{j=1}S_{ij}=1, i = 1, \dots, n\nonumber\\ S_{ij}\geq0, i,j = 1, \dots, n \nonumber \end{eqnarray}


3

Using a simple \smash won't do, because the spacing below the display would be wrong. I'll exploit the fact that the material to be underbraced is small in height with respect to the line it belongs to. \documentclass{article} \usepackage{mathtools} \usepackage{lipsum} % just for the example \newcommand{\smashlastub}[1]{% \sbox0{\let\smash\relax$#1$} ...


5

\smash is your friend: \documentclass{article} \begin{document} \[ \left\{ \begin{array}{l} \frac{da}{dt}=\sum\limits_kJ_k\sin(D_{ok})\\ \frac d{dt}\left\{\begin{array}{c}e\\i\end{array}\right\}=A+\sum\limits_kJ_k\sin(D_{ok})\\ \frac d{dt}\left\{\begin{array}{c}\epsilon\\\Pi\\ \Omega\end{array}\right\}= ...



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