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5

The example shows many issues, some of them: Why is \[ … \] preferable to $$ … $$? What is the difference between \def and \newcommand? \bar is overwritten by \blocks. \Huge and friends do not have an argument. The effect of the font size command remains active until the current group ends: {\Huge #1} instead of \Huge{#1}. Code formatting, code formatting, ...


3

It's really a bad idea to redefine \bar. Plus you're doing by hand things that are already available, using characters that are not what you're expecting: typing | in text mode is not really a good idea, unless you're loading the T1 encoding. \documentclass[a4paper]{report} \newcommand{\blocks}[7]{% \begin{array}{c|c} \begin{array}{@{}cc@{}} #1 & ...


3

the ascii | has the internal code "7C. in computer modern text fonts, position "7C is occupied by the em-dash. when you pack something into a box (\raisebox here), it reverts to horizontal mode, hence | accesses the em-dash. as you have discovered, $|$ accesses the vertical bar, because in the math font, the ascii position is used for this symbol. by ...


3

The default OT1 encoding has ligatures (emdash here) and other things in the ascii punctuation slots, try \documentclass{article} \begin{document} OT1 is strange < | > \end{document}


2

Your problem comes from the blankline and the fact the m type columns are not in math mode. While I was at it, I simplified your code: \documentclass[12pt]{article} \usepackage[margin=2cm]{geometry} \usepackage [english]{babel} \usepackage{amsmath, amssymb} \usepackage{enumitem, array} \begin{document} {\begin{minipage}[t]{\textwidth} ...


4

Only l, c and r columns in array are supposed to contain just math mode material, since paragraphs in math mode don't make much sense. However, you can state math mode in p, m or b columns by adding $ to the specifications. Namely \begin{equation*} \begin{array}{ >{\centering\arraybackslash$}m{1.5cm}<{$} ...


3

This is what you may need actually. \documentclass{article} \usepackage{mathtools} \begin{document} \begin{align*} I\left(a;\frac{1}{a}\right) &= I\left(\frac{1}{a};a\right) \\ I\left(a;\frac{1}{a}\right) &= -I\left(a;\frac{1}{a}\right) \\ \hbar I\left(a;\frac{1}{a}\right) &= 0 \end{align*} \end{document}


1

You have to give up something, if you want to keep justification, and white space control, you need to give up something else. this gives up on the usual hyphenation rules: There are still some gaps but try it with your final font choice, you can always add more hyphenation entries. \documentclass[a4paper, onehalfspacing, 12pt]{article} ...


1

You could load the packages ragged2e and arrayand test with something like >{\RaggedRight\justifying}p{3cm}. But the easiest solution is simply: \usepackage{microtype}. Edit: Both solutions seem not to work with XETEX. See this example: \documentclass[a4paper, onehalfspacing, 12pt, english]{article} ...



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