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9

Here's an example using the tikzmark library for TikZ; there was no information in the question regarding how the formula was typeset, but the idea will still apply: place marks using \tikzmark and then use the marks to draw the arrows and place the accompanying texts: \documentclass{article} \usepackage{amsmath} \usepackage{tikz} \usetikzlibrary{tikzmark} ...


9

\twoheadleftarrow and \twoheadrightarrow can be combined to \twoheadleftrightarrow: \documentclass{article} \usepackage{amssymb} \newcommand*{\twoheadleftrightarrow}{% \twoheadleftarrow \mathrel{\mkern-15mu}% \twoheadrightarrow } \begin{document} \[ \twoheadleftrightarrow \scriptstyle \twoheadleftrightarrow \scriptscriptstyle ...


7

When PGF puts an arrowhead on a line it "backs-up" along the last path segment so that the end of the arrow tip is at the end of path. As plots are (usually) lots of small straight lines PGF backs up along the last straight line segment. When the gradient of the line segments are changing relatively slowly (as in the end points of the sine curve in the ...


7

\documentclass{article} \usepackage{mathtools} \begin{document} \[ \raisebox{-1ex}{$\leftarrow$}\mathllap{\nwarrow}\mkern-10mu\uparrow \] \end{document}


6

How about TikZ and a matrix of math nodes? The code: \documentclass{article} \usepackage{tikz} \usetikzlibrary{matrix} \begin{document} \begin{tikzpicture} % The matrix entries \matrix[ matrix of math nodes, nodes in empty cells, text depth=0.5ex, text height=2ex, ] (mat) { l & & t & P_{L_{1}} & \cdots & P_{L_{n}} \\ 1 ...


5

Here is a suggestion using the decorations.pathreplacing libary for the brace: \documentclass[margin=5mm]{standalone} \usepackage{tikz} \usetikzlibrary{ arrows, intersections, decorations.pathreplacing } \begin{document} \begin{tikzpicture}[ scale=.6, >=latex, font=\footnotesize, domain=1:7, decoration={brace,amplitude=10pt} ] ...


5

The arrowheads of \twoheadrightarrow are quite different from the arrowhead of \hookleftarrow; here's a solution that makes up a two head right arrow from two \rightarrow. \documentclass{article} \usepackage{amsmath,calc} \makeatletter \newcommand{\retraction@inner}[2]{% \vcenter{\offinterlineskip \halign{% ##\cr ...


5

The following example uses \uparrow as base unit, because the arrow reaches from the bottom to the top of the bounding box without interfering side bearings. Macro \@leftuparrow takes three arguments with values 0 and 1 each to denote the left, northwest, and up arrow component of the total symbol. As the examples show, a font for the up arrow should be ...


4

Following my own advice in a previous comment, there is a solution which uses \matrix for creating the tables, which makes easy to connect the individual cells as shown at the end. The only problem was to draw the lines which separate rows. I was unable to do it via some style for the matrix, so I had to resort to coding a macro specific for this task (but ...


4

This answer uses tikzmark as mentioned in the comments on your question. Basically, the idea is to typeset the tables as normal and then overlay them with a tikzpicture which draws the connecting arrows. I've created one tabular for the top two tables and another for the third. The only use of tikz here is to create the arrows in the second column. ...


3

You could just put it in an align environment: % arara: pdflatex \documentclass[12pt,a4paper]{report} \usepackage[latin1]{inputenc} \usepackage{mathtools} \begin{document} \begin{align*} \left\{\begin{array}{cl} \textrm{math stuff} & \\ \textrm{in}&\\ \textrm{here} & \end{array}\right\}&\leftrightarrow ...


3

Your arrows are sticking out of the plot region, enlarging it. To fix, restrict the plot window explicitly with xmin, xmax, ymin, and ymax: \documentclass{standalone} % Setting graphing environment \usepackage{pgfplots} \pgfplotsset{compat=newest} \pgfplotsset{plot coordinates/math parser=false} \begin{document} % declare pgf colormaps: ...


3

% arara: pdflatex \documentclass{article} \usepackage{tikz-cd} \newcommand{\myArrow}[1]{\arrow[start anchor=center, end anchor=center]{#1}} \newcommand{\nothing}{\phantom{\bullet}} \begin{document} \begin{tikzcd}[row sep=.5cm, column sep= .5cm] \nothing&\nothing \\ \nothing&\nothing\myArrow{l}\myArrow{u} \end{tikzcd} ...


3

here's my attempt, using a technique stolen from the \substack command in amsmath. the arrow without the tail is a bit shorter than the other, since the tail is simply added onto tn existing arrow (and they're all the same length), so i've used the minus sign (as traditional with computer modern) to extend it a bit. this version will scale to the current ...


2

The problem is that the arrow head in TikZ is not appended to the line but super-positioned over its end. As the curvature at the end of you cosine curve is quite big, this results in your ugly result (the direction of the arrow is correct...). I added to possible hacks you could try. The first is just shortening the graph to a section with lower curvature ...


2

If regular tabulars are an option, then I would suggest drawing your tabulars in the normal way (i.e. use whichever packages etc. you usually use and like) and then adding the arrows as an overlay using tikzmark. This library lets you add marks in the LaTeX code of the tabulars (or whatever else) and then use those marks to position drawing commands which ...


2

This is a starting point. First define a style (LL here) for snake lines. Then draw a line via \draw[options] (x1,y1) --(x2,y2)node[position]{label}; % Euclid coordi \draw[options] (0,0) --(alpha:radius)node[position]{label}; % polar coordi Options: thick, very thick, color, arrow type,...,LL] Code \documentclass[10pt,a4paper]{standalone} ...


2

You could use the tikz package and the arrows and decorations library to achieve something similar to your drawing. \documentclass[tikz]{standalone} \usetikzlibrary{arrows,decorations.pathmorphing} \begin{document} \begin{tikzpicture}[ >=stealth', pos=.8, photon/.style={decorate,decoration={snake,post length=1mm}} ] \draw[gray,thick] (-2,0) -- ...


1

I think this is what you mean. I use the pst-poly package; it loads pst-node and pstricks. To change its size, just change the value of unit. The solution is almost as simple as possible. Almost, because there seems to be a small bug in pst-poly – unless I missed something: I have to draw an equilateral triangle with invisible sides, and ...



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