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4

\€ is also acceptable Then, a simple approach: \documentclass{article} \usepackage{eurosym,siunitx} \def\€#1{\SI{#1}{\mbox{\euro}}} \begin{document} \€{9x10,00} \end{document}


12

It's trivial with Unicode TeX engines like XeTeX or LuaTeX: \catcode€=\active \newcommand*€[1]{\SI{...}{...}} The same applies to the other TeX engines with 8-bit input encodings (for example, latin9). But it is trickier with UTF-8 bytes as input, because the Euro symbol consists of three UTF-8 bytes. Three bytes cannot be one active byte, also the ...


8

You can't set the category code of € in pdflatex, because it's three byte long. However, there are other methods. \documentclass{article} \usepackage[utf8]{inputenc} \usepackage{textcomp} \usepackage[right]{eurosym} % I can't stand textcomp euro symbol \usepackage{newunicodechar} \makeatletter \newunicodechar{€}{\olivetree@euro} \newcommand{\olivetree@euro}...


4

If you are using pdftex (or tex) then € is three tokens not one. The first character has to be catcode 13 (active) to trigger the UTF-8 interpretation of the following two characters and so it is not possible to define \€ as a TeX command name can only be a single character unless all the characters in the name are catcode 11 (letter). If you use xetex or ...


0

In the meantime, I have partially solved the problem, except for the sorting part and thought of sharing it with you, expecting your valueable comments and suggestions. I chose to make an "external" sort and pasted the result directly in the main tex file, since it seems the easiest of the options. I thought of using the datatool bundle, but the sorting ...


2

The package xcntperchap can do this, with some 'easy' setup, using a dummy track level counter (dummycntr). Since itemize does not use a counter itself, another counter is necessary (for enumerate, it would be much easier, just say \RegisterCounters{dummycntr}{enumi} then. The current version works for the first level of itemize nesting only so far. \...


2

I suggest using aspell as your dictionary. It's a TeX-aware commandline spell checker. If you write a macro \newcommand[1]{\foreign}{\emph{#1}} and add add-tex-cmmand foreign p to your aspell.conf then aspell will ignore any words wrapped in \foreign{}. Then you can spell check your document with aspell -t -c myfile.tex in your own language and replace the ...



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