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5

I learned many good ideas about writing a mathematics book in LaTeX from the code found in the Stacks Project: http://stacks.math.columbia.edu/contribute. This is a huge and extremely complicated book, currently over 5000 pages, with 230 authors. If you have more than one author, avoid using all but the simplest code, and define few macros, because different ...


12

I'll try to extrapolate some issues that I(we) have witnessed here over the years as tendencies. Should I use only one .tex file, or write the chapters in distinct .tex files, then merge them when everything is finished? This is covered extensively in When should I use \input vs. \include?. That's pretty much is almost all you have to know. The main ...


4

Think of whether you will be writing straight TeX only or if you will have to include another step before it. This is an edge case, but when it happens, it is important. For me, I realized that I should start to use knitr in the middle of my thesis. For knitr, you mix up LaTeX and R and then run it through a specific R compiler which outputs pure LaTeX, ...


5

In addition to what is said, some small pieces of advice: Use a version control system Even if you work alone and all your history of editing is linear, you get this way a well-documented history of your work. Compile often, commit often, backup often. If you want to get some other person involved (e.g. a corrector), a version control system is a must. ...


16

Here's my advice ... The first decision is: Who shall the publisher be? Commercial math publishers have a set of standardised book formats (paper size, basic layout, some additional conventions). When you go with such a publisher, use their LaTeX macro packages if possible. When you don't have one, start with the standard book class. Split your input in ...


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Here is my advice (I loved your question so much I needed to propose an answer). Some people may work differently though. I use the same beginning code for all my documents which contains many many many packages, newcommands etc. Everyone does something like this, but it results in a huge accumulation of packages over time, with 80% of them likely to ...



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