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6

Option pdfencoding=auto or unicode enables bookmarks in Unicode with more symbols. Option psdextra defines lots of math symbols, however it misses \varepsilon. Then \pdfstringdefDisableCommands can be used to define a bookmark replacement string for commands. Full example: \documentclass{article} \usepackage[pdfencoding=auto, psdextra]{hyperref} ...


7

There's no problem in what you're doing, although I'd prefer leaving the restoration of the category code: \documentclass{article} \begingroup \catcode`\%=12 \gdef\datestring{ %d } \endgroup \begin{document} \datestring \end{document} If the filter has changed %d into something else, there will be no problem, because the definition of \datestring is ...


4

There is "another form" [of percent command] already defined for this use. \@percentchar which is defined by exactly the construct you show. So in package or class code you can just use \@percentchar directly. However to use in the document preamble ypu need to make @ letter which gives you exactly the same problem, but with @ rather than %. In that case ...


5

You could use this little snippet which defines \textify. The control sequence \textify takes another control sequence (for instance \exists) and wraps it into \ensuremath{…}. I don't think that one needs to go through all the \GlobalLetLtxMacro and \protected\gdef hassle for simple things like \exists, which is only a \mathchar, but this should cover all ...


3

It does not matter, what commands you are taking. If they are already defined for something else, you will notice that soon. And you can always check by typing \show\M in your document. Have a look in your .log then. However, I would not recommend such short macros. First point: The longer, the less likelihood of duplications. Second point: It gets much ...


3

You don't have to change the font size or abandon the basic tabularx structure. All you have to do, really, is to (a) change the column type for the header cells of the first two numeric columns to (a centered version of) the X column type, and (b) place curly braces around the right-hand most column header, viz. \textbf{Porcentaje}, to tell LaTeX to center ...


3

The solution is the makecell package, which allows for line breaks in cells, and a common formatting of column heads. Added a small vertical padding in rows and replaced the l column with X. Finally I took the liberty to correct some inconsistencies in the formatting of boldface numbers in the second row. ...


4

Try to use smaller font (if necessary) and put columns header in more lines, something like this: For above table I added package makecell and put columns header into theader from makecell: \documentclass[fontsize=11pt,paper=letter,headings=small,bibliography=totoc,DIV=9,headsepline=true]{scrartcl} \usepackage[utf8]{inputenx} ...


0

Here is the final version (for this iteration, anyway): \pdfminorversion=7 \documentclass[a4paper,welsh,british,twocolumn]{article} \usepackage{babel} \usepackage[utf8]{inputenc} \usepackage[tt=lining]{cfr-lm} \usepackage{enumitem,geometry,url,fancyref} \usepackage{csquotes} \MakeAutoQuote{‘}{’} \MakeAutoQuote*{“}{”} \geometry{scale=.9} ...



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