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10

biblatex distinguishes two language fields: (1) language and (2) langid. According to the biblatex documentation, p. 20, [the language field holds the] language(s) of the work. Languages may be specified literally or as localization keys. If localization keys are used, the prefix lang is omissible. on p. 25 we have [langid] The language id of the ...


9

Here is a more visual approach based on Alan's great answer. This might complete his explanations with a more visual (and "for dummies") approach. To use your database (i.e. your .bib file) within your LaTeX document, you need an external program to process it — that is, to transform your .bib file into a .tex understandable one. Therefor, you can use ...


9

I'll will give you a more basic approach without additional tools like JabRef. In my opinion, these tools are fine and can make life a lot easier, but you should have a basic knowledge of what is going on under the hood. Another example is latexmk which takes care of the multiple runs of different programs needed for the finished document. But you should ...


9

Find plain.bst on your file system, copy the file, rename the file to something else. Open the file, add a comment that the name has changed and the current year and preferrably your name. Find the edition function and replace it with the following block: FUNCTION {format.edition} { edition empty$ { "" } { output.state mid.sentence = { ...


9

The function change.case$ picks up the top two items in the stack and returns a string. With title "t" change.case$ the two top items are the title and "t". The second argument to change.case$ should be one of "t", "u" or "l"; in the "t" case everything except the first letter is turned into lower case, with "u" everything is turned uppercase and with "l" ...


8

It is in no way discouraged to comment any files you might have written. What you came across is a slight discrepancy in the handling of comments, or if you will a disagreement about what constitutes a comment. According to btxdoc, §4, item 7, p. 13 BibTeX allows in the database files any comment that's not within an entry. If you want to comment out an ...


8

Is title={Title} identical to title={ Title } and title=" Title "? Yes. See below for a sample .bib file and the result of running it through BibTeX, viz., a corresponding .bbl file. The .bbl file is created by BibTeX and is read by LaTeX during subsequent compilations; LaTeX, not BibTeX, does the actual typesetting the formatted bibliography. To study ...


8

It's entirely possible to set this up by editing a standard .bst file, it's just somewhat tedious. There are three things needed. First, you need to tell BibTeX to make entries doi, eprint and eprinttype available by modifying the ENTRY list: ENTRY { ... doi eprint eprinttype ... } Second, you need a function that is going to do the formatting. ...


7

The field type is just for this. Put in your entry type = {Tesis de Maestría},


7

Throw the things you want to maintain your capitalization on into curly braces, e.g. {TCP}.


7

You could use perl to go through the bib file, save all titles as a hash key with its line as the hash value, and then loop through it and print the title if its value has multiple entries. To do so, create a file with the following content, e.g. "finddupls.pl", change the bib file name, then execute perl finddupls.pl in your terminal: #!perl my %seen = ();...


7

First you define a number which is the number of authors you want to show, to do this add to ENTRY { in your .bst file nbr so it will become: ENTRY { address author booktitle chapter edition editor eid howpublished institution journal key month note number organization pages publisher ...


7

Here is a solution using biblatex: All one has to do is to define a new directive to format names: \newcounter{namesleft} \DeclareNameFormat{andNothers}{% \setcounter{namesleft}{\value{author}-\value{liststop}}% \nameparts{#1}% \namepartfamily \ifthenelse{\value{listcount}<\value{liststop}} {\addcomma\addspace}% {\ifmorenames{\printtext{ ...


7

The punctuation sign after the name is determined by the function output.check that, in case the name is not empty calls the function output.nonnull. Shortly, output.nonnull prints a comma if we are in the middle of a sentence, or a period or a space. The style uses the variable output.state to store if we are in the middle of a sentence or elsewhere. Thus, ...


7

The problem lies in your bibtex file field names, which are incorrect if you are using bibtex to process your bibliography (which you are). As you note in the comments, you had been using the bibliography manager included in TeXStudio, which allows you to choose between biblatex and bibtex. biblatex supports a much richer data model than traditional bibtex ...


6

I don't know why this was never answered. But for reference, in case anyone else sees this. When you do Insert --> List/ToC --> BibTeX bibliography, you get this window: The \bibliographystyle is chosen by the Style drop-down menu. Choose the one you want from the list. There is no style called alphaabbrv in the list, but alpha does something like what ...


6

To create a .bib file from scratch, the simplest is to use JabRef, a multiplatform bibliography manager written in java. You only have to choose the type of entries you want to cite (article, book, conference &c.), fill in forms for the relevant fields. JabRef has import and export functionalities. Added: As @AlanMunn recalled, Mac users have another ...


6

Over the years, many packages have been written to do some special bibliography stuff. Urls and DOIs became prominent over the years, and some bibliographystyles have added features to actually cite online material. With biblatex we have a modern package that tries to implement all the functunality of the various packages in just one LaTeX package. It ...


6

In TeXstudio, open Options and then Configure TeXstudio. This opens: In this window, check the Show Advanced Options at the lower left corner. Now, in Build tab, the first field (under Meta Commands) Build & View has this argument: txs:///compile | txs:///view Change it to txs:///compile | txs:///bibliography | txs:///compile| txs:///compile | ...


6

You can use pandoc-citeproc, which is a part of the excellent pandoc program, to convert your .bib file to a .json file. pandoc-citeproc --bib2json foo.bib > foo.json But I doubt the output will be exactly what you need, because the specs you have linked seem to go beyond what pandoc offers.


6

The bibliography style spbasic requires \usepackage{natbib} as it's seen in the comments on top of it %%********************************************************************************%% %% %% %% For Springer medical, life sciences, chemistry, geology, engineering and %% %% ...


6

Using UTF-8 text input and rather basic math approximations we get: \documentclass{article} \usepackage[utf8]{inputenc} \usepackage[T1]{fontenc} \DeclareUnicodeCharacter{025B}{\ensuremath{\varepsilon}} \DeclareUnicodeCharacter{03F5}{\ensuremath{\epsilon}} \DeclareUnicodeCharacter{03B5}{\ensuremath{\varepsilon}} \begin{document} latin open e U+025b [ɛ] ...


6

Use the right packages, in this case textalpha; note that ε is U+03B5 GREEK SMALL LETTER EPSILON. Since we're dealing with the name of a star, the Greek letter is to be used. I also fixed the BibTeX entry for the paper, which had a few errors. \begin{filecontents*}{\jobname.bib} @ARTICLE{1937ApJ....86..570K, author = {Kuiper, G. P. and Struve, O. and Str{...


6

Here a solution mostly stolen from Audrey in Count number of references using biblatex %\RequirePackage{filecontents} \begin{filecontents}{\jobname.bib} @article{one, author = {Bee, B. and Wombat, W.}, title = {Loving cobblestone}, journal = {Stones weekly}, year = {2015}, keywords = {mefirst}, } @...


6

You can use babplain for a babel-aware version of plain part of the babelbib package see texdoc babelbib for more details. You also need to add \usepackage{babelbib} so that it defines all the new fixed texts in an appropriate language.


6

In the standard classes \newblock is defined as \newcommand\newblock{\hskip .11em\@plus.33em\@minus.07em} so it makes a horizontal space, if you use the [openbib] document class option then it is redefined to be \par so force a paragraph break between "blocks" of each entry,


5

If you use the biblatex package and need to load multiple bib files, each bib file needs to be loaded separately via an \addbibresource instruction: \addbibresource{file1.bib} \addbibresource{file2.bib} For more information, see section 3.6.1, "Resources", of the reference manual of the biblatex package.


5

I've found a really useful example here: http://b-p-i.blogspot.com.br/2012/08/cite-iso-standard-bibtex.html?showComment=1383040964617#c6068992346953979068. Here's the code: @techreport{ISO13586, type = {Standard}, key = {ISO 13586:2000(E)}, month = mar, year = {2000}, title = {{Plastics -- Determination of fracture toughness -- Linear elastic fracture ...


5

With package biblatex, you can cite online entries (@online) without anything to care about. All entry fields support an url field as well. Remember, you can even refer to a very specific moment by appending the time to the youtube link. \begin{filecontents}{\jobname.bib} @online{youtube, title = {Some cool motion sensor stuff}, date = {...


5

Recommended solution There's no really simple way to do this elegantly using natbib, since the .bst files that format the bibliography entries either produce the fields or not. There's no way to selectively turn them on or off. For this reason, I would recommend that instead of using natbib you use biblatex to manage your bibliography, since this will allow ...



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