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27

Your issue is "font-dependent". Background Indeed, special shapes of a font (bold, italic, slanted, small caps) are not defined relatively to a main font (its regular shape), but independently. The "bold version" of a font is defined per se (it is an independent *otf, *.ttf-file you can install and use, even if you don't have the main/regular version), and ...


19

Is there any reason(s) not to use \let to redefine \bf to \bfseries and \it to \itshape? Yes, there are good reasons. :-) With the above \let-based setup, {\bf\it ...} produces bold-italic. In contrast, in a plain-TeX document {\bf\it ...} produces italic text. If the goal is to make \bf and \it behave the same way in LaTeX and plain-TeX, the \let-based ...


16

The commands \rm, \bf etc are called "deprecated" because they have been removed from the latex kernel. The way the commands work don't fit in the (much better) "new font selection scheme" (nfss) used by latex2e. A number of classes nevertheless provide the definitions for these commands, but the definitions differ. E.g. memoir: \@memoldfonterr {\rm ...


8

\documentclass{article} \usepackage[T1]{fontenc} \usepackage{libertine} \begin{document} \textsf{Bla bla \textit{P. aeruginosa}} \par \textbf{\textsf{Bla bla \textit{P. aeruginosa}}} \end{document}


5

Some options, but not all, I think, to use bold math in LaTeX: \boldmath is your friend if there's a longer portion of bold math fonts needed, not just a few symbols. Don't forget to use \unboldmath later on. \mathbf{...} is the math bold version of \textbf, i.e. the font is roman and upright letters usually. The package bm provides the \bm command, ...


4

Please always post a mininal working example which can be compiled just by copy/pasting into an editor. To your question, I suggest you use cfr-lm.sty instead of lmodern.sty which provides a better interface to the fonts. You are looking for \sbweight. Code: \documentclass[a4paper]{article} \usepackage[T1]{fontenc} \usepackage{lipsum,geometry} ...


3

You should also load newtxtext, for the text fonts. A small correction should be made as well, for \mathsf{\Omega}. Also load bm, which is better than the standard version for \boldsymbol provided by amsmath. You can also use \bm instead of \boldsymbol. \documentclass{article} \usepackage{amsmath} \usepackage{bm} \usepackage{newtxtext,newtxmath} ...


3

Why not use a simpler code like this: \documentclass[a4paper, 11pt]{book} \usepackage[utf8]{inputenc} \usepackage{mathtools} \begin{document} \begin{align} \mathbf{M} & =\frac{\partial{\mathbf{f}_{T}}}{\partial{\mathbf{\ddot{q}}}} \Biggr|_{q=q_{e}} & \mathbf{C} & ...


2

With biblatex 3.4/biber 2.5 (both current in DEV), there is a general "annotation" functionality to do things like this, for example: \documentclass{article} \usepackage{biblatex} \usepackage{filecontents} \begin{filecontents}{\jobname.bib} @MISC{test, AUTHOR = {Last1, First1 and Last2, First2 and Last3, First3}, AUTHOR+an = {2=highlight}, } ...


2

Before answering your main question, I’ll deal with the additional one: at least in TeX Live, there is a command-line utility program called texdef by means of which you can easily see how, and sometimes where, a command is defined, or, more generally, what is its meaning. The basic syntax is texdef -t <format> <cs> where <format> is ...


2

In a nutshell: \textsf and \textbf and \textit (and virtually as many others as you wish) can be nested without problem. The issue here is in the font file. It should provide the adequate style for all the combined shapes that you want. That is not always the case (especially with cheap fonts or badly designed fonts that one finds on the net). In general, ...


2

For the record, I made substantial efforts to do this cleanly and failed utterly. moderncv hard codes numerous uses of bold and the use of the hooks provided by tweaklist have virtually no effect for our purposes. So, this is not a good way to do this, but it may suffice. Caveat emptor. As recommended by Arash Esbati, we first load cfr-lm. However, we ...


1

Here are two ways -- with mdframed and tcolorbox -- the numbers are bold, as well as the title by default (in book) \documentclass{book} \usepackage[x11names]{xcolor} \usepackage{mdframed} \usepackage[most]{tcolorbox} \setcounter{secnumdepth}{3} \begin{document} \chapter{Foo} \section{Foo} \subsection{Foo} \begin{mdframed}[backgroundcolor=lightgray] ...


1

equation can't be used in a c - like cell -- use p for this. However, I recommend an array or alignat* environment rather for this setup, since the equation will also display an equation number which might not be requested at all. I also changed from \frac to \dfrac. Most likely, the text-likely exponents should be typeset with \text{ncons} etc., but I ...


1

Some comments about your code, listed in no particular order: \partial does not take an argument. Hence, don't write \partial{\mathbf{f}_{T}}; go for the simpler \partial\mathbf{f}_T. You won't get an error message if you add an extra layer of braces; however, doing so does clutter up the code needlessly. None of the \substack directives are needed. ...



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