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4

EBGaramond with Monotype Garamond Bold This example mixes EBGaramond with Monotype's Garamond in pdfLaTeX. Note that this code will not compile as written for you. You would need to substitute a suitable alternative for the bold Garamond I've used. (Or configure TeX support for it on your machine, if you have the same font.) \documentclass{article} ...


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\documentclass{article} \usepackage{ebgaramond} \begin{document} abc \textbf{xyz} \end{document} warns you there is no bold: LaTeX Font Info: Font shape `OT1/EBGaramond-OsF/bx/n' in size <10> not avail able (Font) Font shape `OT1/EBGaramond-OsF/m/n' tried instead on input line 7. This comes from ...


3

I would really really like to discourage you from mixing a Garamond medium-weight upright and italic font with a Times-like bold and bold-italics font. (Incidentally, I'm not sure why you mention euler in your query, as it's a pure math font and thus completely unsuited for running text.) If you must mix and match EB Garamond with another Garamond, you're ...


3

There is a difference. \textit and \textbf change independent font attributes, the shape and the series. If the font is changed in two steps, then the first step might cause a LaTeX Font Warning depending on the current font attributes, if the combination in this step is not available. Example: \documentclass{article} \makeatletter ...


0

Another solution to the problem can be achieved with user-defined scripts in the recently-developed Bibulous bibliography processor for TeX/LaTeX. For this, we can define the function that generates the citation label, and make sure that it appears bold any time that the reference includes, say, "de Broglie" as an author. Thus, with the following files ...


0

tohecz, to answer your question: the style file I was using was imsart.sty. As I said, after the modification, it works well for me now. Concerning the addendum, I agree that it was a sort of answer to my own question. However, strangely to me as well, the stackexchange website advised me to place the addendum as an edit of my question, rather than an ...


0

As already mentioned by @David Carlisle you cannot match an arbitrary number of well-nested { } pairs. But, from a practical perspective, you may know an upper-bound on the maximum nesting level. If this bound is known, then it is possible to write a regular expression recognizing well-parenthesised expressions up to the maximum nesting level. To recognise ...


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\documentclass{article} \title{$e=mc^2$ in bold} \let\oldmaketitle\maketitle \renewcommand\maketitle{{\bfseries\boldmath\oldmaketitle}} \begin{document} \maketitle $e=mc^2 $ \end{document}


1

if you can use non-greedy quantifiers, replace \\textbf\{(.*?)\} with \1 Ok, as Werner mentioned, this only works with non-nested commands. I think, there is no simple solution for this and it's a parser job. If you want to do it anyway with Regex, you could replace the non-\textbf-brackets with a non-used symbol, and at then end remove the ...


0

As it may be of benefit to others, I will mention the solution I currently use: In a document with a lot of greek vectors, I switch the document font from Computer Modern to Charter and use the isomath package, such that \mathbf works as expected on greek characters: \documentclass{article} \usepackage[charter,cal=cmcal]{mathdesign} ...


6

A modification of my answer to Automatically check if a math character is greek or latin should do: \documentclass{article} \usepackage{xparse} \usepackage{bm,upgreek} \ExplSyntaxOn \NewDocumentCommand\Vector{m} { \commexo_vector:n { #1 } } \cs_new_protected:Npn \commexo_vector:n #1 { \tl_map_inline:nn { #1 } { \commexo_vector_inner:n { ##1 ...


3

For sizes below 10pt the cmbright package is subsetting bold fonts (which don't exists) and uses the normal weight instead. You can change this by adding this code behind cmbright: \usepackage{cmbright} \fontencoding{OT1}\fontfamily{cmbr}\selectfont %to load ot1cmbr.fd \DeclareFontShape{OT1}{cmbr}{bx}{n}{% change bx definition <->cmbrbx10% }{} ...


4

You can simply load unicode-math MWE: \documentclass[10 pt]{beamer} \usetheme{default} \usepackage{lmodern} % load a font with all the characters \usepackage{fontspec} \usepackage{amsmath}%loads amsmath that should go before unicode-math \usepackage{unicode-math} \usepackage{cmbright} \SetSymbolFont{largesymbols}{normal}{OMX}{iwona}{m}{n} ...


1

There is no \normaltext command, it is possible to change the series of the font with the \mdseries command, which sets it to medium, or with the \normalfont command, which sets the font series, shape and familiy to the default value. So what you need is something like: \documentclass{beamer} \usecolortheme{seagull} \setbeamerfont{alerted ...



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