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4

With sectsty, another way. \documentclass{article} \usepackage{sectsty} \sectionfont{\centering\normalfont\scshape} %\allsectionsfont{\centering\normalfont\scshape} % for all sectional levels \usepackage{lipsum} \begin{document} \section{Introducton} \lipsum[1] \section{Another Section} \lipsum[2] \end{document}


3

A solution that uses all the tools of titlesec: \documentclass{article} \usepackage[utf8]{inputenc} \usepackage[textwidth=140mm, textheight=213mm, marginratio={4:6,5:7}]{geometry} \usepackage{amsmath, amsfonts, amssymb} \DeclareMathOperator\GL{\mathfrak{gl}} \DeclareMathOperator\chr{char} \usepackage[noindentafter]{titlesec} ...


1

\documentclass{article} \usepackage[explicit]{titlesec} \titleformat{\section}{\normalfont}{\thesection}{1em}{\centering\textsc{#1}} \usepackage{lipsum} \begin{document} \section{Introducton} \lipsum[1] \section{Another Section} \lipsum[2] \end{document}


6

centred caps and small caps headings, look like amsart class to me. \documentclass{amsart} \begin{document} \section{Introduction} \end{document}


2

My solution uses \uppercase when reading the third parameter of \harvardcite which is used in .aux file. Then we need to replace ET~AL. to et.~al.. I used the macro \replacestrings from my OPmac for this purpose. \documentclass{article} \usepackage{harvard} \let\harvardciteori=\harvardcite \def\harvardcite#1#2#3#4{\uppercase{\def\tmpb{#3}}% ...


1

[This is an attempt at a solution, not a solution!] The ability to choose between mixed cases in the acronym package is desperately lacking. The new command you alluded to in your original question would be really helpful. I've had a crack but can't get it to work, it needs to be something like: \newrobustcmd{\LU}[4]{\if@in@acrolist#1\else#2\fi} % upper ...


4

So long as you don't have special characters such as \ss or \i in the author names, this should work without requiring changing .bst files. \begin{filecontents*}{\jobname.bib} @BOOK{Campbell(1996), AUTHOR = {J. Y. Campbell and A. W. Lo and A. C. MacKinlay}, TITLE = {The econometrics of financial markets}, PUBLISHER = {Princeton University ...


7

\documentclass{article} \usepackage{harvard} \citationmode{abbr} \citationstyle{dcu} \bibliographystyle{xdcu} \newcommand\HARVARDAND{\harvardand} \begin{document} A \citeasnoun{Campbell(1996)} B \cite{Hamilton(1994)} \bibliography{tst} \end{document} xdcu.bst is a copy of dcu.bst with "u" change.case$ added in some likely looking places (I ...


3

The problem is similar to the one in Latex Confused with Word in heading You solve it by doing \DeclareRobustCommand{\ABCD}{\mathbf{ABCD}} so LaTeX won't see ABCD and try to lowercase it. However, you should think whether the style you're using is compatible with having math in titles. It isn't, in my opinion.


9

Rather than complicate your macros forever I'd just edit the file. if your sec.tex file is \section{My Title} ..... \section{With Title Case} ... Then after a command such as sed -ie "s/\\\\section{\(.\)\([^{}]*\)}/\\\\section{\\1\\L\\2}/" sec.tex then it will be \section{My title} ..... \section{With title case} ... I used sed on the ...


6

You Shouldn't Be Writing Like This. If you really want, then be prepared to have problems with these macros. ;-) \documentclass{article} \usepackage{etoolbox} \makeatletter \patchcmd\@sect{#8}{\MakeFirstUppercase{#8}}{}{} \newcommand{\MakeFirstUppercase}[1]{% \@MakeFirstUppercase#1\@MakeFirstUppercase } \def\@MakeFirstUppercase#1#2\@MakeFirstUppercase{% ...



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