New answers tagged

5

biblatex has a host of commands for that. There are (see pp. 199-200 of the biblatex doc) \ifinteger to check if the given argument is a positive integer \ifnumeral to check if the argument is a number given either in the Roman or Arabic system \ifnumerals for ranges of (Roman or Arabic) numerals \ifpages for detection of pages Those commands have a ...


0

For me, the following solution is working: \documentclass{scrartcl} \usepackage[utf8]{inputenc} \usepackage[T1]{fontenc} \usepackage[polutonikogreek, english]{babel} \usepackage[english]{betababel} \begin{document} Philosophische Anthropologie\\ \textbf{Die Lehre (\bcode{lo/gos}) vom ,,Menschen'' (\bcode {a)/ntropos})}. Urspr"ungleich wollte man den ...


0

Use can write Greek directly with the alphabeta package. \documentclass {article} \usepackage [utf8] {inputenc} \usepackage [greek, english] {babel} \usepackage {alphabeta} \begin {document} Text in Greek: τίνι ἢ γὰρ, ἄμφω \end {document}


9

If the engine is Unicode aware and a font is used, which contains the glyph for the private Unicode code point: ^^^^e25f See: The ^^ notation in various engines. This is TeX's method to encode non-ASCII characters with ASCII and can also be used inside command tokens. There are also commands to select a character by slot in the current font: LaTeX ...


45

In none of the presented cases you should use \mbox. Phone numbers should use a kern, such as 123\,456\,7890 Things such as p.~210~sq.\@ should use a tie (note the \@ in order not to make the period as a sentence ending one) Names should use ~: Jean de~La~Fontaine (you may want to remove the first ~ if line breaking becomes otherwise unfeasible) Space ...


21

The \mbox is totally unbreakable, i.e., it does not allow hyphenation nor any other breaks. The tilde ~ inserts an unbreakable space, but does not affect the breakability of its left and right neighbours. So in La~Fontaine the Fountaine part can still be hyphenated. So, the tilde is easier to type and to read in the TeX source and it has the other ...


2

Here is a (non exclusive) list of fonts on CTAN that have this character (it belongs to the series Latin extended additional in the unicode description): Latin Modern –erewhon –Linux Libertine O – ebgaramond – tex-gyre.


1

You may want to look into using either XeLaTeX or LuaLaTeX to compile your documents. They support utf8 input encoding natively (in fact, it's the only input encoding they support...). Do also make sure you use a font that features the character ẁ. % Compile with XeLaTeX or LuaLaTeX and load a font that contains "ẁ" \documentclass{article} ...


3

The ẁ character is not supported in Latin-1; save your file as UTF-8 and add \usepackage[utf8]{inputenc} and also \DeclareUnicodeCharacter{1E81}{\`w} Full example: \documentclass{article} \usepackage[utf8]{inputenc} \DeclareUnicodeCharacter{1E81}{\`w} \begin{document} Is the character ẁ used in some language? \end{document}


3

(You mentioned that you're working on Overleaf, so here's what you can do to get your Overleaf project to compile correctly.) Method 1: Use XeLaTeX or LuaLaTeX ...which are able to handle UTF8 characters out of the box. On Overleaf, you can set the engine to use by clicking on the Settings icon (the gear icon on the upper right of the editor, just next ...


5

As was told you in the comments, you can (and should if you're using xelatex) use a font that supports all IPA glyphs. Since you're using a table, you can automatize this so that only the cells with IPA use that font, and the headers use the regular font. For the headers I'm using a particular font here just to show the difference, but you can use anything ...


9

As explained by this answer, you can either use tipa and compile using pdfLaTeX or load a Unicode IPA font using fontspec and compile using XeLaTeX or LuaLaTeX. I strongly recommend using a Unicode IPA font rather than tipa for the reasons outlined in this answer. Here is an example that uses the IPA versions of most of the symbols shown in the image you ...


0

Users looking to make common accents in regular text mode can do so with, for example, \'e. MWE: \documentclass[10pt]{article} \begin{document} Alfred Land\'e. \end{document} Output:


1

Remove the aeguill package: it was an interesting hack several years ago, when Type1 versions of the European Modern fonts were not available. Now it should be regarded as obsolete. Without \usepackage[cyr]{aeguill} I get (ignoring the two errors that are unrelated)



Top 50 recent answers are included