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17

The following examples uses that the tikz code for the arc uses a center node named arccenter. The tikz option argument for the \draw command of the arc can be used with option late options to put a label in the center: \documentclass{article} \usepackage{chemfig} \begin{document} \chemfig{ N**[0,-144,dash pattern=on 2pt off 2pt, late ...


16

Here are the fish you wanted, that I caught with texdoc chemfig. \documentclass{article} \usepackage{chemfig} \begin{document} \setatomsep{2em} \setdoublesep{.3em} \renewcommand*\printatom[1]{\ensuremath{\mathsf{#1}}} \chemfig[line width=1pt] { HO-*6(-=-(-(-[::90]CH_3)(-[::-90]CH_3)-*6(-=-(-OH)=-=))=-=) } \end{document} Now your turn to fetch the ...


12

Pershaps, the chemfig package may help you though it relies on tikz? Here is the first reaction: \documentclass{minimal} \usepackage{chemfig} \begin{document} text before \schemestart \setlewis{4pt}{}{red}\Lewis{0:,\chemfig{@{a}\textcolor{red}{A}}}\hskip4pt\chemfig{@{b}\textcolor{black!40!green}{B}}% \arrow \Lewis{0.,A}% \+\Lewis{4.,B}% ...


12

This is not fully automatic (you need to specify the rotation for the molecule and the corresponding \chemmove command) and the TikZ code can most likely be improved but it may be a start. It places two invisible bonds where I've marked the respective ends with chemfigs @{<node name>} syntax. They are used to draw the rectangle later. ...


12

Yes chemifg is a great tool. But as well as almost every code to picture system the syntax is not trival. Please consider the following example. You can easily see, that chemfig syntax follows a logical and human readable syntax, but will become extremely complex for larger structures. And so far as i can see chemfig is the easiest system for chemical ...


11

This answer was provided to me by Christian Tellechea in private correspondence; I post it here for the benefit of other people who may be interested. \documentclass{minimal} \usepackage{chemfig,xstring} \makeatletter % "\derivesubmol" defines the new #1 submol, obtained by replacing all the % occurrences of "#3" by "#4" in the code of #2 submol % ...


11

I would propose to insert a small invisible bond: \documentclass{article} \usepackage{chemfig} \begin{document} \chemfig{*6(-(-[,.1,,,draw=none\Lewis{0.,})=-=-=)} \end{document} If you need it more often it is probably a good thing to define a suitable submol: \documentclass{article} \usepackage{chemfig} \definesubmol{e}{-[,.1,,,draw=none]} ...


10

Here are a different versions using different chemistry packages. Which one you want to use is up to you... chemfig, provides \startscheme, \stopscheme, \chemfig, \lewis, \Lewis, \chemname ... ; mhchem, provides \ce{}; chemformula (part of the chemmacros bundle), provides \ch{} with the !(<below>)(<formula>) syntax and \chlewis; bohr, provides ...


10

I introduce \lewis with 7 arguments, and I apologize that I don't know the precise naming conventions for chemistry. (EDITED to specify valence in only one place). Arguments: #1 Core atom #2 Top electrons #3 Right electrons #4 bottom electrons #5 left electrons #6 valence #7 inner electron shells \documentclass{article} ...


10

An example for this is given in the documentation of chemfig (part III section 12.5 Draw polymer element). There a macro \makebraces(<dim up>,<dim down>){<subscript>}{<opening node name>}{<closing node name>} is defined that exploits chemfig's @{<node name>,<pos>} syntax inside formulas to position delimiters on a ...


9

Something like this? MWE: \documentclass{article} \usepackage{chemfig} \begin{document} \chemfig{P(=[2,0.7]O)(-[:-30,0.8]C_{5}H_{11})(-[:150,0.8]C_{5}H_{11}O)(-[:210,0.8]C_{5}H_{11}O)} \end{document} To specify an angle you have to use the notation [:<angle>], while to specify a custom length for the bonds you have to use [,<length>], so ...


9

I've never written anything with chemfig before so had to just guess at the syntax. This is basically my comment above made into an example and expanded a little. There are two ways to achieve the effect of one line going over another. One way is for the under line to "know" that it is the under line and break itself at the crossing point (this is what I ...


8

I'm guessing the \circleatom is a copy of what I used here. I vaguely remembered having defined something like it before. The middle of an -U> arrow is a node named Uarrow@arctangent. If you have only one such arrow you can use that fact to write something beneath it with \chemmove: \documentclass{article} \usepackage{chemfig} ...


8

I would write this: \chemfig{A -[:-45]B -[:180,0.75]C -[:45,,,,preaction={draw=white, -,line width=6pt}]D }


8

chemfig allows to add explizit node names to either bonds or atoms in its formulae by using the @{<name>} syntax. These names can be used in a tikzpicture with the options remember picture, overlay to draw the curved arrows. chemfig provides the wrapper \chemmove for this. So a combination of chemfig and TikZ can be used to draw the schemes. (BTW: the ...


8

The chemmacros package offers s,p and sp-hybrid orbitals (based on TikZ), d orbitals are missing (for now). These are examples from the documentation: \documentclass{article} \usepackage{chemfig,chemmacros} \begin{document} \setbondoffset{0pt} \chemsetup[orbital]{ overlay , opacity = .75 , p/scale = 1.6 , s/color = blue!50 , s/scale = 1.6 ...


8

\centerline{ isn't really a latex command (it is in the latex format but just escaped from plain TeX). It makes a box \hsize wide but does not know about latex list structures and the indentation they introduce. So you line is too wide by 25pt which will be the left margin of the list item. Just remove \centerline and replace it with a ...


7

The \chemfig command has two optional arguments. The manual says this: The \chemfig command takes two optional arguments; their syntax is as follows: \chemfig[<opt1>][<opt2>]{<molecule code>} The first optional argument <opt1> contains tikz instructions which will be passed to the tikzpicture environment in which the ...


7

I've contacted Christian Tellechea, the maintainer of the chemfig package. Hi Christian, there is currently a discussion about bound joints in chemfig on tex.stackexchange: Ugly bond joints in chemfig Are you aware of that problem? Is it a chemfig-problem or a TikZ problem? I would really appreciate it if you could participate in the ...


7

I actually figured this issue out by digging through the 83 pages of the chemfig manual. Here's the code I've changed and the following result: \chemleft[\chemfig{\lewis{,H}\pol{+}-\lewis{2:,O}\pol{-}(-[6]\lewis{,H}\pol{+})-\lewis{,H}\pol{+}}\ind\ind\chemright]^{+}


7

Here are two ideas: \documentclass{article} \usepackage{chemfig} \definesubmol{ring}{(-[::-60]=^[::60]-[::60])=_[::60]-[::-60]=_[::-60]} \definesubmol{ring2}{(**6(------))-[,,,,draw=none]-[,,,,draw=none]} \begin{document} \chemfig{-!{ring}-!{ring}-!{ring}} \chemfig{-!{ring2}-!{ring2}-!{ring2}} \end{document}


7

You had a syntax error with a final } bracket missing on the last compound. Apart from that to put a label on an arrow use the general form \arrow{->[up][down]} To colour atoms, use {\color{red}H}. However, in a number of situations, such as ends of bonds, you need to write {}|{\color{red}H} instead. \documentclass[12pt,letterpaper]{report} ...


7

\chemabove and \chembelow may help : \documentclass{article} \usepackage{chemfig} \newcommand*\circleatom[1]{\tikz\node[circle,draw,fill=green!30]{\printatom{#1}};} \begin{document} \setlewisdist{4pt} \schemestart \chemname{% \chemfig{% H_{2} -[:-90]\lewis{0:,N} -[:225]H_{2}C -[:-45]C(=[:-90]O) ...


7

I'd use an invisible bond pointing to the center of the ring (with a relative angle) to place the plus. Something like (-[::126,,,,draw=none]\oplus), possibly scaled a bit. On the other hand I do like Heiko's answer better than mine :) \documentclass{article} \usepackage{chemfig} \begin{document} \chemfig{ R-[:36]N **[216,360,dash pattern=on 2pt off ...


6

ChemFig is a great package but I don't believe that you'll gain much in time if you create your schemes with it rather than with ChemDraw. Once you know you're way around ChemFig you're just as fast or slow with it than with ChemDraw (supposing you know your way around that, too), at least that's my experience. There are other points you should consider: ...


6

It is not possible to draw such schemes with mhchem but as Twig has already noticed chemfig can be used. To expand a bit on Twig's answer and chemfig's possibilities: the \arrow command is the important macro here which is only valid between \schemestart and \schemestop. It has lots of arguments so here is a quick overview: draw an arrow and call the ...


6

I'd draw the bold single bonds with the line-width command -[,,,,line width=2pt]. A bold double bond can be achieved by drawing a bold single bond backwards (angle = 180°) over the double bond: -[::180,,,,line width=2pt]. Here is an example: \documentclass[a4paper]{scrreprt} \usepackage[utf8]{inputenc} \usepackage{chemfig} ...


6

My suggestions for the three points: just use math mode instead of a \chemfig command. write the N before you start the ring: N*5(-----) I would pass a suitable TikZ style to the node containing the text. This can be achieved with the \arrow command: \arrow(<start node>[<options>]--<end node>[<options>]). ...


6

To avoid breaking the lines, create an empty bond and attach it To raise or lower an argument of \chemabove or \chembelow, use the optional argument The chemfig manual recommends \definesubmol\nobond{[,0.2,,,draw=none]} in 12.2 Add a superscript without modifying a bond and using this: \documentclass{minimal} \usepackage{chemfig} ...


6

I'll answer under the assumption that you're the one who emailed me the other day about Missing bond type in chemical rendering packages? and to whom I suggested the following definition of the submol {Rsubst}: \tikzset{ subst/.style={shorten <= 10pt,preaction={draw=white,line width=6pt}} } \definesubmol{subst}{-[,-1,,,draw=none]-[::-30,1.5,,,subst]} ...



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