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I'm not sure why you want to typeset the reactions with chemfig. It is an excellent package for drawing skeletal formulae of organic compounds. However, the reactions in your example are much easier typeset with mhchem or chemformula. The latter is loaded by chemmacros so you already have it available. \documentclass{memoir} \usepackage[utf8]{inputenc} ...


3

Here it is. chemfig basically works like Tikz. You can set nodes and use those nodes to draw arrows, etc. I did the brackets by drawing arcs, and setting nodes on the lines. It would have been easier if each "atom" was a node, but I haven't found anything in the documentation. In any case, if you discover something like that, you can remove the extra nodes ...


3

Do you mean something like this? It uses the fact that chemfig's formulas are tikzpictures. chemfig offers the possibility to give explicite names to the nodes in a formula using @{name} (this is explained in the manual). Later one can refer to those nodes in a seperate tikzpicture. \chemmove simply is a wrapper for a tikzpicture with the options remember ...


1

You cannot use the external tikzlibrary with chemfig because its \tikzexternal@laTeX@collect@until@end@tikzpicture macro, when it executes \begin{tikzpicture}, collects everything until it finds \end{tikzpicture}. There is an issue when external tikzlibrary is used with chemfig because: there is no \end{tikzpicture} but a \endtikpicture; the ...


1

Depending on the use case I'd use submols: \documentclass{standalone} \usepackage{chemfig} \definesubmol{r}{-[::-60]} \definesubmol{l}{-[::60]} \begin{document} \chemfig{[:30]-!r!l!r!l} \end{document}



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