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No need an extra package, \chemname does the job: \documentclass{article} \usepackage{chemfig} \begin{document} \begin{center} \schemestart \chemfig{CH_3Cl} \+ \chemname{\chemfig{Si{(Cu)}}}{Silicon\\/CopperAlloy} \arrow(.mid east--.mid west) \chemname{\chemfig{{(CH3)}_2SiCl2}}{Dimethyldichlorosilane} \+ \chemfig{Cu} \schemestop \end{center} ...


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As in this answer, you can draw over a chemfig by usin remember picture, overlay and naming coordinates with @{}. \documentclass[border=7mm]{standalone} \usepackage{chemfig} \setatomsep{2em} \setdoublesep{.3em} \begin{document} \chemfig[remember picture, line width=1pt]{ ...


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First of all, check page 20 of the manual for how to write molecule names properly using chemname. There you can also find the alignment methods. In your case, this should work: \begin{center} \schemestart \chemnameinit{\chemfig{*6(=(-[,.65]CH_2OH)-=-(-[,.65]OH)=-)}} \chemfig{*6(=-=-(-[,.65]OH)=-)} \chemsign{+} \chemname{\chemfig{CH_2O}}{Formaldehyde} ...


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Here I use stacks to accomplish the underset. The \useanchorwidth{T} option means that the width of the underset text does not affect the equation spacing. \documentclass{beamer} \usepackage{chemfig} \usepackage[usestackEOL]{stackengine} \renewcommand\useanchorwidth{T} \renewcommand\stacktype{L} \begin{document} \begin{center} \schemestart \chemfig{CH_3Cl} ...



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