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Here's a chemfig only way: use its \startscheme ... \stopscheme mechanism in combination with the invisible »arrow« 0 and the anchoring of TikZ nodes. The trick here: \arrow(@c1.south east--.north east){0}[-90,.1] an invisible arrow {0} pointing downwards (-90) and shortened (.1) that connects compound c1 with a new one, the former anchored south east ...


4

Here's a crazy idea: use a tabular. \documentclass{article} \usepackage[T1]{fontenc} \usepackage[utf8]{inputenc} \usepackage[ngerman]{babel} \usepackage{array,chemfig} \usepackage{lipsum}% dummy text \begin{document} \lipsum[1] \begin{figure}[htbp] \centering \begin{tabular}{c@{\qquad}c@{\qquad}c} \chemfig{ ...


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Please do not use tables to draw chemical structures. There's the already mentioned chemfig package and a few alternatives available for drawing chemical structures and schemes, see Can you make chemical structure diagrams in LaTeX? and the posts tagged chemfig. Also there's no need to use a tikzpicture for positioning the compounds. It's far easier to use ...


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chemfig can be used inside align environment. Thus, it can be done as \documentclass{minimal} \usepackage{chemfig} \usepackage{amsmath} \begin{document} \begin{align*} \chemfig{Cl}\chemsign+\chemfig{O_3} & \chemrel{->} \chemfig{ClO}\chemsign+\chemfig{O_2} \\ \chemfig{ClO}\chemsign+\chemfig{O} & \chemrel{->} ...



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