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5

You might want to use the decoration complete sines from Nicer wavy line with TikZ as I've used in a blog post of mine a while ago: \documentclass{article} \usepackage{tikz} \usepackage{chemfig} \usetikzlibrary{decorations.pathmorphing} \pgfdeclaredecoration{complete sines}{initial}{ \state{initial}[ width=+0pt, next state=sine, persistent ...


4

Use \Chembelow (upper case!) instead of \chembelow. From the manual (emphasis by me): The macro[...] \chembelow[<dim>]{<code>}{<stuff>} place[s] the <stuff> [...] below the <code> [...] without changing the bounding box of <code>. The uppercase version on the other hand does extend the bounding box. (\lewis ...


3

Compounds inside \schemestart and \schemestop are tikz nodes with names you can refer to. chemfig names them c1, c2, … but you can also give them own names. You can use this in \chemdraw to place the minus: \documentclass{article} \usepackage{chemfig} \usetikzlibrary{calc} \begin{document} \begin{center} \schemestart \chemleft[ ...


2

You can obtain this arrow with \schemestart \arrow{<=>}\schemestop or with \chemrel{<>} Code \documentclass{scrartcl} \usepackage[T1]{fontenc} \usepackage[utf8]{inputenc} \usepackage{chemfig} \begin{document} \chemname{\chemfig{R-[:30](=[:90]O)-[:-30]O-[:30]H}}{Carboxygruppe} \chemsign{+} \chemname{\chemfig{H-[:30]O-[:-30]R_2}}{Hydroxygruppe} ...


2

Section 6 “Delocalized double bonds” from chemfig documentation. I also suggest to use \schemestart ... \schemestop to draw reaction scheme. \documentclass{article} \usepackage{chemfig} \usetikzlibrary{decorations} \pgfdeclaredecoration{ddbond}{initial} { \state{initial}[width=4pt] { \pgfpathlineto{\pgfpoint{4pt}{0pt}} \pgfpathmoveto{\pgfpoint{2pt}{2pt}} ...


1

I borrowed a code from Mathmode, § 55 to define an extensible \xrightleftharpoons command with one mandatory argument (will be placed above the arrow) and one optional (placed below) \documentclass{scrartcl} \usepackage[T1]{fontenc} \usepackage[utf8]{inputenc} \usepackage{chemfig} \usepackage{amsmath} \makeatletter% \def\rightharpoonupfill@{% ...


1

Indeed, the culprit was \setcrambond. It needs the two other options, even though they are empty. \setcrambond{2pt}{}{} is the correct form (adding ; or not doesn't matter).


1

Taken the code from the other answer (and not verifying if the formulae match the picture) I came up with the following. For the numbering I use the chemnum package (but you should use more meaningful names than me, I chose one, two, three…). For formal charges, the cis/trans nomenclature and the molecules on the arrows I use the chemmacros/chemformula ...


1

The Chembelow macro can be used but the result is not perfect since the bounding box (too high) modifies the position of bonds coming and leaving N: \Chembelow cannot give a good result and \chembelow sends H outside the croping. A solution is to use an invisible bond (the .25 lenght found with try/error): \documentclass{standalone} \usepackage{chemfig} ...


1

You can use \subscheme like this: \documentclass{standalone} \usepackage{chemfig} \begin{document} \schemestart \subscheme{H\arrow{<=>[*{0}$K_{hd}$]}[-90]H:H}% \hspace{-1em}+\hspace{-1em}\subscheme{G\arrow{<=>[*{0}$K_{gd}$]}[90]G:G}% \arrow{<=>[*{0}$K_{1}$]}H:G% \arrow{<=>[*{0}$K_{2}$]}H:G:G \schemestop \end{document}



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