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9

Something like this? MWE: \documentclass{article} \usepackage{chemfig} \begin{document} \chemfig{P(=[2,0.7]O)(-[:-30,0.8]C_{5}H_{11})(-[:150,0.8]C_{5}H_{11}O)(-[:210,0.8]C_{5}H_{11}O)} \end{document} To specify an angle you have to use the notation [:<angle>], while to specify a custom length for the bonds you have to use [,<length>], so ...


7

I've contacted Christian Tellechea, the maintainer of the chemfig package. Hi Christian, there is currently a discussion about bound joints in chemfig on tex.stackexchange: Ugly bond joints in chemfig Are you aware of that problem? Is it a chemfig-problem or a TikZ problem? I would really appreciate it if you could participate in the ...


7

I actually figured this issue out by digging through the 83 pages of the chemfig manual. Here's the code I've changed and the following result: \chemleft[\chemfig{\lewis{,H}\pol{+}-\lewis{2:,O}\pol{-}(-[6]\lewis{,H}\pol{+})-\lewis{,H}\pol{+}}\ind\ind\chemright]^{+}


7

You had a syntax error with a final } bracket missing on the last compound. Apart from that to put a label on an arrow use the general form \arrow{->[up][down]} To colour atoms, use {\color{red}H}. However, in a number of situations, such as ends of bonds, you need to write {}|{\color{red}H} instead. \documentclass[12pt,letterpaper]{report} ...


6

It works with two set of curly braces (changed the color to blue): \documentclass{article} \usepackage{color} \usepackage{chemfig} \begin{document} \chemfig{ [:30]HO-*6(-=-(-=[::-60]-[::60](=[2]O)-[:-30]{\color{red}O}> *6(--(([6]<OH)-(-[:30]OH)=[6] {{\color{blue}O}} )--(<:OH)-(<HO)-) )=-(-HO)=) } \end{document} ...


6

I have tried to "fix" the problem. It is not really a "bugfix" (since there is no bug) but a dirty workaround. It seems to work : The beta version needs more testing. If you can't wait (or want to test it), you can download it here. The zip file contains the package source itself (chemfig.tex), a small test file (test.tex) and the pdf manual, compiled ...


6

I was really a conflict between babel with czech and chemfig. I found the following solution on LaTeX community: \documentclass[oneside,czech]{book} \usepackage{babel} \usepackage{chemfig} \usepackage{etoolbox} \pretocmd\schemestart{\shorthandoff{-}}{}{} \apptocmd\schemestop{\shorthandon{-}}{}{} \begin{document} \schemestart A \arrow(aa--bb) B ...


6

I'd draw the bold single bonds with the line-width command -[,,,,line width=2pt]. A bold double bond can be achieved by drawing a bold single bond backwards (angle = 180°) over the double bond: -[::180,,,,line width=2pt]. Here is an example: \documentclass[a4paper]{scrreprt} \usepackage[utf8]{inputenc} \usepackage{chemfig} ...


6

I was able to draw using \chemmove, remember picture and @{} syntax for naming atoms and links. \documentclass[varwidth,border=50]{standalone} \usepackage{tikz} \usepackage{chemfig} \begin{document} \begin{tikzpicture}[remember picture, node distance=0] \node (foo){}; \node (a) [draw,minimum height=0.5cm,minimum width = 0.7cm, above of = foo, node ...


5

I've found a way. It was rather simple, but I've hoped that there is a special command for such thing, because there is one in chemdraw. Here is the code: \documentclass[12pt,a4paper]{article} \usepackage{graphicx} \usepackage{chemfig,tikz} \begin{document} \begin{figure}[h] \centering { \setatomsep{2em} ...


5

You can use \chembelow[<dim>]{<code>}{<stuff>}. I have used siunitx, in addition, to write those percentages. \documentclass[12pt,letterpaper]{report} \usepackage{chemfig,chemmacros} \usepackage{siunitx} \begin{document} \begin{center} \schemestart \chembelow[1.5ex]{\chemfig{CH_4}}{} \chemsign{+} \chemfig{Cl_2} ...


5

I propose the following solution. I've made a number of changes: First of all I find your use of enumerate a bit strange. It looks like you want equation numbers for your reactions. If that's it then I'd use an equation environment. With the class option leqno its numbers will be placed on the left. I'd still use chemfig's \schemestart ... \schemestop ...


5

chemfig's molecules can get a default rotation by specifying an angle as option first in the molecule: \chemfig{[:<angle>]...} Choosing the right angle will do the trick here: \documentclass{article} \usepackage{chemfig} \definesubmol{imidazole}{N*5(=-{NH}-(-)=-)} % imidazole ring \begin{document} ...


4

»not very elegant« is not a very precise description of what's wrong... First of all I'd use a list for the, well, list, i.e., enumerate. The labels can easily be adjusted with enumitem. Then I'd make the arrows longer using the last optional argument of the \arrow command: \arrow[<angle>,<length factor>] I'd also shorten the bond length a ...


4

Here's a chemfig only way: use its \startscheme ... \stopscheme mechanism in combination with the invisible »arrow« 0 and the anchoring of TikZ nodes. The trick here: \arrow(@c1.south east--.north east){0}[-90,.1] an invisible arrow {0} pointing downwards (-90) and shortened (.1) that connects compound c1 with a new one, the former anchored south east ...


4

Here's a crazy idea: use a tabular. \documentclass{article} \usepackage[T1]{fontenc} \usepackage[utf8]{inputenc} \usepackage[ngerman]{babel} \usepackage{array,chemfig} \usepackage{lipsum}% dummy text \begin{document} \lipsum[1] \begin{figure}[htbp] \centering \begin{tabular}{c@{\qquad}c@{\qquad}c} \chemfig{ ...


4

I defined TikZ decorations: \documentclass{article} \usepackage{chemfig} \usetikzlibrary{decorations} \makeatletter \newdimen\mystartshorten \newdimen\myendshorten \mystartshorten0pt \myendshorten0pt \pgfdeclaredecoration{sdbond}{initial}{ \state{initial}[width=\pgfdecoratedremainingdistance,next state=final] { { ...


4

Here is how to draw the 2 first arrows: \documentclass{article} \usepackage{chemfig} \begin{document} \chemfig{*6((-[@{a1}]H_2@{a2}\Lewis{26,N})=[@{r1}]-[@{r2}]=(-N=N-*6(=-=(-OH)-=-))-=-=)} \chemmove[-stealth,shorten <=1pt, shorten >=1pt]{% \draw(a2)..controls +(90:5mm) and +(135:5mm)..(a1);% first arrow \draw(r1)..controls +(225:12mm) and ...


4

I cobbled this together using the example in the chemfig package (section 12.7). Edit: I also added a plain label (without arrows) next to the bond. I think this looks better because the line with arrows is not quite parallel to the line indicating the bond. \documentclass[a4paper, 12pt, twocolumn]{article} \usepackage[utf8]{inputenc} ...


3

No need an extra package, \chemname does the job: \documentclass{article} \usepackage{chemfig} \begin{document} \begin{center} \schemestart \chemfig{CH_3Cl} \+ \chemname{\chemfig{Si{(Cu)}}}{Silicon\\/CopperAlloy} \arrow(.mid east--.mid west) \chemname{\chemfig{{(CH3)}_2SiCl2}}{Dimethyldichlorosilane} \+ \chemfig{Cu} \schemestop \end{center} ...


3

The trick is to use invisible bonds. The lenght of a 6-ring is 2 bonds: \documentclass{article} \usepackage{chemfig} \begin{document} \setatomsep{1.75em} \chemfig{C(-[4,2]**6(---(-[,3,,,draw=none])---))(=[6]O)-O?-[,4,,,draw=none]?*6(---N(-CH_3)---)}\vskip5ex ...


3

Here is another idea: if you place each of the parentheses between braces ({(} and {)}) they are treated like an atom (i.e. like C or H) and you can use the optional argument of the bonds to determine where the bond arrives: <bond>[<angle>,<length factor>,<departure atom>,<arrival atom>,<TikZ options>] Where ...


3

Inside a scheme (i.e. between \schemestart and \schemestop) the \arrow commands needs to be used directly and not hidden in a macro. But there are other possibilities. In order to use your \nc macro as a shortcut for \arrow{0}[,0] chemfig's scheme mechanism must treat it like it treats \arrow. That can be achieved rather easily by patching ...


3

There is also a "simple" way without tikz using LaTeX's picture environment. The first picture environment is used to place the counter-ion that is set by the second: \documentclass[12pt,a4paper]{article} \usepackage{graphicx} \usepackage{chemfig} \begin{document} \begin{figure}[h] \centering { \setatomsep{2em} \setlength{\unitlength}{2em} ...


3

Here is what I would probably do: you already found out about the 0 arrow. It can be combined with the fact that everything between two arrows again is a node that can be referred to. chemfig names them consecutively c1, c2, ... (you can check the nodes and their names placing \schemedebug{true} befor the scheme starts). However, the \arrow macro allows to ...


3

The “problem” is empty space. The arrows actually are not far away from what chemfig sees as compound. You can verify this by adding \schemedebug{true}: \documentclass{article} \usepackage{chemfig} \usepackage{tikz} \begin{document} \begin{figure} \centering \schemedebug{true} \setatomsep{1.5em} \schemestart \chemfig{**6(------)} ...


3

Since you're already loading the chemmacros package which loads and uses the chemformula package you can use the latter for the reaction. The key is the !(<below>)(<text>) syntax inside of \ch. \documentclass[12pt,letterpaper]{report} \usepackage{chemmacros} % \usepackage{siunitx} % already loaded by `chemmacros' \begin{document} ...


3

If it should like (near) exactly as in the picture, the following modification may be useful. The angles are assummed to be 30 and 120 degrees; hence the correction: 120+72=192. Your original definition is left in the preamble for comparision. \documentclass{article} \usepackage{chemfig} \definesubmol{ring}{N*5(=-{NH}-(-)=-)} % imidazole ring ...


2

A possible way is to redefine the commands \arraystretch and \tabcolsep within the table environment. \tabcolsep controls the spacing between before and after the column type specifier (c) in this case. \arraystretch controls the spacing between rows. You should use the values which suits your needs. My values were just initial guesses to show it works. ...


2

I recommend using chemfig instead of trying to accomplish your task with tables. It will give you the structure you need, and it's not too difficult to learn. \documentclass{article} \usepackage[paperwidth=300pt, paperheight=150pt]{geometry} % for this example only \usepackage{chemfig} \begin{document} \begin{tikzpicture} \node at (-1.4,-1.5) (nh1) {% ...



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