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17

The following examples uses that the tikz code for the arc uses a center node named arccenter. The tikz option argument for the \draw command of the arc can be used with option late options to put a label in the center: \documentclass{article} \usepackage{chemfig} \begin{document} \chemfig{ N**[0,-144,dash pattern=on 2pt off 2pt, late ...


16

Here are the fish you wanted, that I caught with texdoc chemfig. \documentclass{article} \usepackage{chemfig} \begin{document} \setatomsep{2em} \setdoublesep{.3em} \renewcommand*\printatom[1]{\ensuremath{\mathsf{#1}}} \chemfig[line width=1pt] { HO-*6(-=-(-(-[::90]CH_3)(-[::-90]CH_3)-*6(-=-(-OH)=-=))=-=) } \end{document} Now your turn to fetch the ...


12

This is not fully automatic (you need to specify the rotation for the molecule and the corresponding \chemmove command) and the TikZ code can most likely be improved but it may be a start. It places two invisible bonds where I've marked the respective ends with chemfigs @{<node name>} syntax. They are used to draw the rectangle later. ...


10

I introduce \lewis with 7 arguments, and I apologize that I don't know the precise naming conventions for chemistry. (EDITED to specify valence in only one place). Arguments: #1 Core atom #2 Top electrons #3 Right electrons #4 bottom electrons #5 left electrons #6 valence #7 inner electron shells \documentclass{article} ...


9

Here are a different versions using different chemistry packages. Which one you want to use is up to you... chemfig, provides \startscheme, \stopscheme, \chemfig, \lewis, \Lewis, \chemname ... ; mhchem, provides \ce{}; chemformula (part of the chemmacros bundle), provides \ch{} with the !(<below>)(<formula>) syntax and \chlewis; bohr, provides ...


9

Something like this? MWE: \documentclass{article} \usepackage{chemfig} \begin{document} \chemfig{P(=[2,0.7]O)(-[:-30,0.8]C_{5}H_{11})(-[:150,0.8]C_{5}H_{11}O)(-[:210,0.8]C_{5}H_{11}O)} \end{document} To specify an angle you have to use the notation [:<angle>], while to specify a custom length for the bonds you have to use [,<length>], so ...


8

chemfig allows to add explizit node names to either bonds or atoms in its formulae by using the @{<name>} syntax. These names can be used in a tikzpicture with the options remember picture, overlay to draw the curved arrows. chemfig provides the wrapper \chemmove for this. So a combination of chemfig and TikZ can be used to draw the schemes. (BTW: the ...


7

Here are two ideas: \documentclass{article} \usepackage{chemfig} \definesubmol{ring}{(-[::-60]=^[::60]-[::60])=_[::60]-[::-60]=_[::-60]} \definesubmol{ring2}{(**6(------))-[,,,,draw=none]-[,,,,draw=none]} \begin{document} \chemfig{-!{ring}-!{ring}-!{ring}} \chemfig{-!{ring2}-!{ring2}-!{ring2}} \end{document}


7

The \chemfig command has two optional arguments. The manual says this: The \chemfig command takes two optional arguments; their syntax is as follows: \chemfig[<opt1>][<opt2>]{<molecule code>} The first optional argument <opt1> contains tikz instructions which will be passed to the tikzpicture environment in which the ...


7

I actually figured this issue out by digging through the 83 pages of the chemfig manual. Here's the code I've changed and the following result: \chemleft[\chemfig{\lewis{,H}\pol{+}-\lewis{2:,O}\pol{-}(-[6]\lewis{,H}\pol{+})-\lewis{,H}\pol{+}}\ind\ind\chemright]^{+}


7

I'd use an invisible bond pointing to the center of the ring (with a relative angle) to place the plus. Something like (-[::126,,,,draw=none]\oplus), possibly scaled a bit. On the other hand I do like Heiko's answer better than mine :) \documentclass{article} \usepackage{chemfig} \begin{document} \chemfig{ R-[:36]N **[216,360,dash pattern=on 2pt off ...


6

Yes, I have an idea: \documentclass{article} \usepackage{chemfig} \begin{document} \definesubmol\cc{**6(---!\ff-!\ee--)} \definesubmol\dd{**6(-!\ee--!\ff---)} \definesubmol\ee{**6(-----)} \definesubmol\ff[(-^{-}OOC)]{(-COO^{-})} \chemfig{Cu^+(-[1]N([0,.5]!\cc))(-[3]N([:180,.5]!\dd))(-[5]N([:180,.5]!\cc))(-[7]N([:0,.5]!\dd))} \end{document}


6

My suggestions for the three points: just use math mode instead of a \chemfig command. write the N before you start the ring: N*5(-----) I would pass a suitable TikZ style to the node containing the text. This can be achieved with the \arrow command: \arrow(<start node>[<options>]--<end node>[<options>]). ...


6

I've contacted Christian Tellechea, the maintainer of the chemfig package. Hi Christian, there is currently a discussion about bound joints in chemfig on tex.stackexchange: Ugly bond joints in chemfig Are you aware of that problem? Is it a chemfig-problem or a TikZ problem? I would really appreciate it if you could participate in the ...


6

It works with two set of curly braces (changed the color to blue): \documentclass{article} \usepackage{color} \usepackage{chemfig} \begin{document} \chemfig{ [:30]HO-*6(-=-(-=[::-60]-[::60](=[2]O)-[:-30]{\color{red}O}> *6(--(([6]<OH)-(-[:30]OH)=[6] {{\color{blue}O}} )--(<:OH)-(<HO)-) )=-(-HO)=) } \end{document} ...


6

I was really a conflict between babel with czech and chemfig. I found the following solution on LaTeX community: \documentclass[oneside,czech]{book} \usepackage{babel} \usepackage{chemfig} \usepackage{etoolbox} \pretocmd\schemestart{\shorthandoff{-}}{}{} \apptocmd\schemestop{\shorthandon{-}}{}{} \begin{document} \schemestart A \arrow(aa--bb) B ...


5

I have tried to "fix" the problem. It is not really a "bugfix" (since there is no bug) but a dirty workaround. It seems to work : The beta version needs more testing. If you can't wait (or want to test it), you can download it here. The zip file contains the package source itself (chemfig.tex), a small test file (test.tex) and the pdf manual, compiled ...


5

I've found a way. It was rather simple, but I've hoped that there is a special command for such thing, because there is one in chemdraw. Here is the code: \documentclass[12pt,a4paper]{article} \usepackage{graphicx} \usepackage{chemfig,tikz} \begin{document} \begin{figure}[h] \centering { \setatomsep{2em} ...


5

Chemfig's bonds have an optional argument that takes several parameters one of them being a factor to scale the bond length: <bond>[<angle spec>,<length factor>,<other parameters>] So you can just add that option to the bonds you want shorter: \documentclass[a4paper,11pt]{scrartcl} \usepackage[utf8]{inputenc} ...


5

You can: \documentclass{article} \usepackage{chemfig} \makeatletter \newcommand*\forcelen[1]{#1/\CF@atom@sep} \makeatother \begin{document} These bonds are exactly 5mm long: \chemfig{-[,\forcelen{5mm}]-[:60,\forcelen{5mm}]} \end{document} If both atoms are not empty, the argument of \forcelen is not the length of the bond. It is the distance between the ...


5

I propose the following solution. I've made a number of changes: First of all I find your use of enumerate a bit strange. It looks like you want equation numbers for your reactions. If that's it then I'd use an equation environment. With the class option leqno its numbers will be placed on the left. I'd still use chemfig's \schemestart ... \schemestop ...


5

chemfig's molecules can get a default rotation by specifying an angle as option first in the molecule: \chemfig{[:<angle>]...} Choosing the right angle will do the trick here: \documentclass{article} \usepackage{chemfig} \definesubmol{imidazole}{N*5(=-{NH}-(-)=-)} % imidazole ring \begin{document} ...


4

Here is how to draw the 2 first arrows: \documentclass{article} \usepackage{chemfig} \begin{document} \chemfig{*6((-[@{a1}]H_2@{a2}\Lewis{26,N})=[@{r1}]-[@{r2}]=(-N=N-*6(=-=(-OH)-=-))-=-=)} \chemmove[-stealth,shorten <=1pt, shorten >=1pt]{% \draw(a2)..controls +(90:5mm) and +(135:5mm)..(a1);% first arrow \draw(r1)..controls +(225:12mm) and ...


4

I defined TikZ decorations: \documentclass{article} \usepackage{chemfig} \usetikzlibrary{decorations} \makeatletter \newdimen\mystartshorten \newdimen\myendshorten \mystartshorten0pt \myendshorten0pt \pgfdeclaredecoration{sdbond}{initial}{ \state{initial}[width=\pgfdecoratedremainingdistance,next state=final] { { ...


4

chemfig's \Lewis uses \printatom (a chemfig macro) internally. You have to redefine it: \documentclass{beamer} \usepackage[T1]{fontenc} \usepackage{chemfig} \usepackage{chemmacros} \chemsetup[chemformula]{font-shape=sf} \renewcommand*\printatom[1]{\ensuremath{\mathsf{#1}}} \begin{document} \begin{frame} \begin{reactions} Cl-Cl ...


4

»not very elegant« is not a very precise description of what's wrong... First of all I'd use a list for the, well, list, i.e., enumerate. The labels can easily be adjusted with enumitem. Then I'd make the arrows longer using the last optional argument of the \arrow command: \arrow[<angle>,<length factor>] I'd also shorten the bond length a ...


4

I don't normally advertize the tabu package (see this post for reasons why) but in this case it is very handy. It scales the table horizontally to textwidth per default if you use its X type columns. Those columns have an optional argument for specifying the ratio of one column to another: X[1]X[2] would mean that the second column has a width twice as much ...


4

Perhaps something like this is what you want: \documentclass[12pt]{report} \usepackage{chemfig} %these for bonds in chemfig \setdoublesep{0.35700 em} % 'Bond Spacing' \setatomsep{1.78500 em} % 'Fixed Length' \setbondoffset{0.18265 em} % 'Margin Width' \newcommand{\bondwidth}{0.06642 em} % 'Line Width' \setbondstyle{line width = \bondwidth} %Drawing ...


4

You typed \chemfig{...Cl[@{op,.25}]...} which implies an optional argument to the »Cl« atom. There are no optional arguments to atoms, though! This means chemfig interprets the quare brackets as atoms, i.e., it typesets them. This leads to the “little box” you see. There are two legal places for the @{...} syntax: a zero size node on a bond using the ...


4

In a bind, you can slap it on after the fact with a \stackinset. The syntax here means that the inset item (a bold +) is placed 10pt to the right of center, and 15pt above center on the underlying \chemfig. \documentclass{article} \usepackage{chemfig} \usepackage{stackengine} \begin{document} \stackinset{c}{10pt}{c}{15pt}{\textbf{+}}{% \chemfig{ ...



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