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1

Depending on the use case I'd use submols: \documentclass{standalone} \usepackage{chemfig} \definesubmol{r}{-[::-60]} \definesubmol{l}{-[::60]} \begin{document} \chemfig{[:30]-!r!l!r!l} \end{document}


0

Well, there is no built-in way to use such a shortcut. But, we can hack one together by re-\defining the code that processes the bond angle specification. (PS I'm rather new at doing this sort of thing, so improvement suggestions are welcome!) Somewhat arbitrarily, I'll choose letters a through l (lowercase ell) to represent the angles 0 through 330 ...


1

You cannot use the external tikzlibrary with chemfig because its \tikzexternal@laTeX@collect@until@end@tikzpicture macro, when it executes \begin{tikzpicture}, collects everything until it finds \end{tikzpicture}. There is an issue when external tikzlibrary is used with chemfig because: there is no \end{tikzpicture} but a \endtikpicture; the ...


0

I wrote a short application of the answer provided by Christian Tellechea via @MichaelPalmer above, adding all nucleosides and making a doublestranded picture. The full code can be found here. \documentclass[11pt]{standalone} \usepackage{chemfig,xstring} %Draw molecules with easy syntax \usepackage{times} \frenchspacing \makeatletter % ...


5

I'm not sure why you want to typeset the reactions with chemfig. It is an excellent package for drawing skeletal formulae of organic compounds. However, the reactions in your example are much easier typeset with mhchem or chemformula. The latter is loaded by chemmacros so you already have it available. \documentclass{memoir} \usepackage[utf8]{inputenc} ...


3

Do you mean something like this? It uses the fact that chemfig's formulas are tikzpictures. chemfig offers the possibility to give explicite names to the nodes in a formula using @{name} (this is explained in the manual). Later one can refer to those nodes in a seperate tikzpicture. \chemmove simply is a wrapper for a tikzpicture with the options remember ...


0

Please study section 11 Representig electron movements of the chemfig manual. Here is one possibility which (more or less) exactly uses the mechanism presented there. The idea is the following: chemfig's formulas are tikzpictures. chemfig allows to give the nodes inside the formulas names using its @{name} syntax. These nodes can be referred to later in a ...


3

Here it is. chemfig basically works like Tikz. You can set nodes and use those nodes to draw arrows, etc. I did the brackets by drawing arcs, and setting nodes on the lines. It would have been easier if each "atom" was a node, but I haven't found anything in the documentation. In any case, if you discover something like that, you can remove the extra nodes ...


0

I suggest using booktabs. For the centered dot to denote product of units, just add \sisetup{inter-unit-product=\cdot} to your document preamble. For a text hyphen in a chemical formula, use \text{-}. You can incorporate it inside \textit for t-Bu. \documentclass[french,12pt,oneside,openright]{memoir} \usepackage{amsmath} \usepackage{siunitx} ...



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