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Only after I had the code finished I realised that your code shows something different than the picture. But the alignment idea should work nonetheless. As you might know chemfig allows to add anchor names in compounds using the @{<name>} syntax which can be referred to in \chemmove for example, but also in arrows \arrow(@<name>--). The code ...


1

You want this result, right? Then CH3CHCH3 must be considered as one group of 6 atoms (C, H, C, H, C and H) where the bond is leaving from the third atom. You need to tell this to chemfig using the bond's optional argument <departure>: <bond>[<angle>,<length factor>,<departure>,<arrival>,<tikz>] The code then ...


1

I thing that your code work well with [version=3]{mhchem}: \documentclass[11pt]{article} \usepackage[version=3]{mhchem}% <--- \usepackage{chemfig} \begin{document} \ce{ \chemfig{CH_3-CH (-[2]OH)-CH_3} + HI -> \chemfig{CH_3-CH(-[:90]I)-CH_3} + H2O} \end{document}


3

Remove the \ce command, that will fix the links. The arrow is done with the command \arrow. Also remember to enclose it between \schemestart and \schemestop. Output Code \documentclass[11pt]{article} \usepackage[version=4]{mhchem} \usepackage{chemfig} \begin{document} \schemestart \chemfig{CH_3}\chemfig{CH(-[2]OH)}\chemfig{CH_3} + HI \arrow(.mid ...


1

The order of atoms is the order you type them in: if you type OH then chemfig uses OH, if you type HO then chemfig uses HO. Ideally you also tell chemfig that the bond starts at the O. This can be done with the optional argument of a bond: <bond>[<angle>,<length factor>,<departure>,<arrival>,<tikz>] So starting your ...


2

chemfig is based on tikz and it is converted to svg images with tex4ht. If we use example from G.P.'s answer, we get this result: \documentclass{article} \thispagestyle{empty} \usepackage{chemfig} \begin{document} \chemfig{ * 6((=O)-N(-CH_3)- * 5(-N=-N(-CH_3)-=)--(=O)-N(-H_3C)-)} \end{document} using htlatex filename command this solution has ...


1

Create a document that contains the formula and nothing else. Compile it to a pdf file, and then convert it to png using pdftoppm. Create the document containing the formula, called chem.tex like this: \documentclass[margin=10]{standalone} \usepackage{chemfig} \begin{document} \chemfig{ * 6((=O)-N(-CH_3)- * 5(-N=-N(-CH_3)-=)--(=O)-N(-H_3C)-)} ...


2

Basically the answer is: have a look at TikZ anchors and how to use them with chemfig's \arrow: \arrow(<node name>.<anchor>--<node name>.<anchor>) All node names and anchors are optional. Those can be used with an invisible downarrow (angle: -90) to achieve alignment, e.g., by aligning the lower right-hand edge of the upper ...


2

Like this? The code: \documentclass[11pt]{article} \usepackage{chemfig} \usepackage{siunitx} \begin{document} \schemestart \chemname{\chemfig{HC~CH}}{Acetylene} \arrow(.{15.5}--){->[Red Hot \chemfig{Cu} tube][\SI{400}{\celsius}]}[0,2,] \chemname{\chemfig{**6(------)}}{Benzene} \arrow{0}[,0] \+ \chemfig{Mg {(OH)} Cl} ...


1

Some notes: The first shape can be created by specifying the number of sides. I used \chemrel for the arrows but the editor was complaining that it was deprecated. Not sure about this since the manual still has the command. Besides it works. I scaled the second graph a bit, it was too big, but feel free to modify it as you want. On the second graph, the ...


2

I write a possible solution \documentclass{article} \usepackage{chemfig} \begin{document} \schemestart \chemfig{*6(=-=-=-)}\arrow{0}[,0]\+ 3\,\chemfig{O_3} \arrow ...


3

A name can be put below a molecule with \chemname{<molecule>}{<name>}. In a scheme everything between different \arrows is consideres as one compound and the arrow is centered to the whole structure. This can be made visible with \schemedebug{true}: So one possibility is to put invisible arrows of zero length (\arrow{0}[,0]) in between: ...


2

You need to study the syntax of the \arrow: \arrow[<angle>]: give an angle for the arrow (default 0) \arrow(<node name>--): give a name to the compound where the arrow starts \arrow(--<node name>): give a name to the compound where the arrow ends \arrow(<node name>--<node name>): give a name to the compound where the arrow ...



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