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1

Why not take a look at the git-repo of the developers? https://github.com/mredaelli/circuitikz The values are defined in the file: https://github.com/mredaelli/circuitikz/blob/master/tex/pgfcirc.defines.tex (For versions <0.5 this file was called circuitikz.code.tex) The shapes you will find in the other files, mainly pgfcircbipoles for path ...


2

There is more than one way to draw perpendicular lines. \documentclass{standalone} \usepackage{circuitikz} \begin{document} \begin{tikzpicture}[american, font=\sffamily] \ctikzset{bipoles/resistor/height=0.1} \ctikzset{bipoles/resistor/width=0.3333} \node[nigbt](qcl) at (0,2.5) {}; \node[op amp, yscale=-1](u1) at (2,0.75) {}; \draw (0,0) to ...


1

aha, figured out another way, by not trying to use the -* syntax and manually making circles aligned using -|: \documentclass{standalone} \usepackage{circuitikz} \usepackage{tikz} \begin{document} \begin{tikzpicture}[american, font=\sffamily] \ctikzset{bipoles/resistor/height=0.1} \ctikzset{bipoles/resistor/width=0.3333} \node[nigbt](qcl) at (0,2.5) {}; ...


3

I've changed a little bit your code but with similar results. First, all blocks are drawn, all with a different name. This way you can later use this name. If you always use mynode it's impossible to distinguish among different nodes. And because we have different names a foreach loop can help us to drawn all links between nodes. Finally, four antennas ...


1

solved another one myself by looking at source code... It's /tikz/circuitikz/voltage/distance from node (grrr, I wish these were documented) \documentclass{standalone} \usepackage[siunitx]{circuitikz} \begin{document} \begin{circuitikz}[american] \draw (0,0) to[/tikz/circuitikz/bipoles/length=0.6cm, D*, v^=$v_g$] (2,0) node [right] ...


1

ah -- I found it: \raisebox does the trick: \documentclass{standalone} \usepackage[siunitx]{circuitikz} \begin{document} \begin{circuitikz}[american] \draw (0,0) to[/tikz/circuitikz/bipoles/length=0.6cm, D*, v^=$v_g$] (2,0) node [right] {\tiny\verb|default|}; \draw (0,1) to[/tikz/circuitikz/bipoles/length=0.6cm, D*, ...


0

Oh, never mind, it looks like MiKTeX installs stuff in c:\Users\{myusername}\AppData\Roaming\MiKTeX\2.9\tex\latex\circuitikz I was looking at the directory where I installed MiKTeX.


2

After many number of Trials, i was finally able to finish the code. Thanks a lot John Kormylo for the suggesstions. They really helped me a lot. Here is the code and Output after all the changes. Some one may find it useful later on. \documentclass{article} \usepackage{graphicx} \usepackage{circuitikz} \usetikzlibrary{calc} \begin{document} ...


7

Here are a few of the more difficult features. \documentclass[border=2pt]{standalone} \usepackage{circuitikz} \usetikzlibrary{calc} \begin{document} \begin{circuitikz}[european] \draw (0,0) node[above] {$\textrm{K}_1$} to[R,l=$R_p$,v=\mbox{$U_{R_p},L_{R_p}$},*-*] (2,0);% \mbox hides the comma from the parser % Transformer \node (T) [transformer] at (1,-1) ...


1

I wasn't sure which way you wanted your arrows to point, so I made them all point up. As for subfigures and compatibility with babel, the easiest solution is to create your own. Babel defines \figurename and \listfigurename, but you really don't need a subfigure name. The only compatibility issue would be if the alphabet changes. ...



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