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2

Have a look at cirkuit. This kde editor for tikZ circuit macros provides live preview, snippets and more.


0

What GUI applications are there to assist in generating graphics for TeX? contains a list of GUI tools for TeX. Your question seems to be a duplicate (by asking just for a part of what has been asked there).


1

There is a simpler scheme to achieve the goal. A proposed approach that defines a mymeter command taking 2 arguments \#1=name, \#2=angle of rotation. Basically it redefines the voltmeter by drawing a mymeter that has the rotation ability. \newcommand{\mymeter}[2] { % #1 = name , #2 = rotation angle \begin{scope}[transform shape,rotate=#2] \draw[thick] ...


1

Since there is a 2-junction SQUID called squid in the circuitikz, the proposed solution modifies squid into \squidthree and \squidfour via renewcommand syntax to draw the symbols shown in the OP. Every symbol has internal input/output labels called a1,b1,c1 and a2,b2,c2,d2 counterclockwise so that they can be used for connections Code ...


2

This is a circuitikz solution. Two blocks are defined for bandpass filter and mixer called, respectively, \BPF and \cross. Both redefine AC voltage sources into a set of drawing commands to draw the symbols. Code \documentclass[border=10pt]{standalone} \usepackage{tikz} \usepackage[american,siunitx]{circuitikz} \usetikzlibrary{arrows,calc,positioning} ...


4

Since there is no wattmeter in the circuitikz, you need to draw one. Here the solution modifies the DC voltage source and create a wattmeter via newcommand that takes one argument for label Code \documentclass[border=10pt]{standalone} \usepackage{tikz} \usepackage[american,siunitx]{circuitikz} \usetikzlibrary{calc,positioning} ...


2

A possilbe solution is to define a buffer gate called \buffergate via \newcommand syntax that takes two arguments #1=name and #2= rotation angle. The proposed solutions redefine not port into \buffergate, so that buffer gate can be used inside a circuitiz drawing. An example from circuitikz is borrowed and the proposals follow. \newcommand{\buffergate}[2] ...


1

An alternative: use of orthogonal coordinate Code \documentclass[border=10pt,varwidth]{standalone} \usepackage{tikz} \usepackage[american,siunitx]{circuitikz} \usetikzlibrary{calc,positioning} \begin{document} An alternative solution \begin{circuitikz} \draw (0,0) node[op amp](opamp){} (opamp.out) to[short,*-o] (2,0)node[]{} node[right]{$v_{out}$}; ...


0

\draw let \p1=(opamp.out),\p2=(opamp.-) in (opamp.-) to [short,*-] ++(0,1) node{} to [R,l=$R_2$] ++($(\x1,0)-(\x2,0)$); Note that you have to \usetikzlibrary{calc}. The let syntax let you alias the points with names \p1 ... \pN, where N is the number of points. Then, after in, you could access points' coordinates with the syntax \x1 .. \xN and \y1 .. \yN ...


1

A PSTricks solution using the pst-circ package: \documentclass{article} \usepackage{pst-circ} \begin{document} \begin{pspicture}(11.3,8) \psset{invertoutput = true} \logicxor[ninputs = 2](6.8,3){} \logicand[ninputs = 4](0,0){} \logicand[ninputs = 4](0,6){} \psline(4.5,1)(5.4,1)(5.4,3.5)(6.8,3.5) \psline(6.8,4.5)(5.4,4.5)(5.4,7)(4.5,7) ...


2

You put NAND1 below NAND2, but input 1 is above input 2. Also, you used ++ when + would do (not that it matters). \documentclass{standalone} \usepackage{tikz} \usetikzlibrary{circuits.logic.US} \begin{document} \begin{tikzpicture}[circuit logic US] \draw (0,0) node[nand gate](NAND1){} ($(NAND1.north west)!.25!(NAND1.input 1)$) -- +(-.5,0) (NAND1.input ...


1

You can use the dotted or densely dotted line styles, or you can define your own dash pattern. See page 168, sec. 15.3.2 of the PGF 3.0 manual. Note that I've minimized your preamble to only what is necessary here, and substituted the mathtools package for amsmath. \documentclass{standalone} \usepackage{mathtools} \usepackage[european]{circuitikz} ...



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