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6

Yes, you can override the kernel \@cite macro to make it bold. But then you'd probably also like to make the label in the bibliography - \@biblabel - bold: \documentclass{article} \usepackage[utf8]{inputenc} \usepackage{filecontents} \usepackage[usenames,dvipsnames]{xcolor} \usepackage{hyperref} \hypersetup{% colorlinks=true, linkcolor=black, ...


4

When \cite is followed by [, it does \@tempswatrue, otherwise it does \@tempswafalse. When \if@tempswa returns true, it means that the optional argument should be typeset. So changing \@tempswatrue into \@tempswafalse will do: \documentclass{article} \usepackage{xpatch} \makeatletter \xpatchcmd{\cite}{\@tempswatrue}{\@tempswafalse}{}{} \makeatother ...


3

Here's another option. The idea here is to redefine \@cite to reject typesetting the note. Two commands are defined: \Rejectcitenote, to discard the optional argument, and \Alllowcitenote to, well, allow typesetting the optional argument. These commands can be used at will: \documentclass{article} \makeatletter ...


3

Given that the numeric-comp style is used, it is possible to implement \citenum as follows: \DeclareCiteCommand{\citenum} {} {\printfield{labelnumber}} {} {} It can be use with other styles as well using the labelnumber package option. \documentclass{article} \usepackage{filecontents} \begin{filecontents}{\jobname.bib} @article{article1, ...


3

When you edit the source bibtex files (i.e. the *.bib) then you must rerun the complete bibtex sequence. This must be done because pdflatex does not read the *.bib file directly, but the supporting input file *.bbl is constructed by bibtex, etal. However, in a more general sense, if you are using bibtex or biber you should always run the full sequence ...


3

It's very easy. ;-) The macro responsible for the final printing of the citation is \@cite, the standard definition is % latex.ltx, line 6271: \def\@cite#1#2{[{#1\if@tempswa , #2\fi}]} The \if@tempswa conditional is set to true if \cite has an optional argument. \begin{filecontents*}{\jobname.bib} @article{uthor2015, author={A. Uthor}, title={A ...


3

Copy humannat.bst as humannat-mod.bst in the same directory as your main TeX file. Open it with any text editor and change the two occurrences of "\leavevmode\nopagebreak\newline" into " " Then change \bibliographystyle{humannat} into \bibliographystyle{humannat-mod}, rerun LaTeX and BibTeX, then LaTeX again. To get parentheses around the year, go ...


2

I do not know what I am doing ;). Caveat emptor... This code attempts to define a new citation command, \textualcite[<prenote>][<postnote>]{<key list>} which produces the target output. Since you didn't post any code, I have no idea if this will work with your actual bibliography style, document class and usage; whether your cat will ...


2

As you've confirmed in a comment, implementing @egreg's suggestion and getting rid of the extra pair of curly braces around the author fields (and around the editor fields too, while you're at it) lets LaTeX and BibTeX generate the desired citation call-out format. To address the second issue -- listing the authors' full names as "Surname, FirstName" rather ...


2

By the way, you should use the more modern biber with biblatex! The option you are looking for is named sortcites: \documentclass[]{article} \begin{filecontents*}{references.bib} @misc{first, title={Reference A}, author={Alice}, year={1980}, } @misc{second, title={Reference B}, author={Bob}, year={2000}, } \end{filecontents*} \usepackage[ ...


2

This is probably too late, but I reached your post and searching a bit more I think I found the answer. You can fix that by using \shortcites{key-list} before the first occurrence of the citation to the reference of many authors. Instead of "key-list", you should list the citation keys of all bib entries for which the first citation call-outs should use ...


2

The problem is not the tilde but the fact that the package cite seems to check for missing white space in front of the citation. With cite loaded, A \cite{x}, A~\cite{x}, and A\cite{x} result in the very same. All of them get one white space in front of your [<number>]. The error we are getting now, is that cite seems to have problems in finding ...


2

The following solution only works for the standard environment equation without package amsmath. It stores the cite command in macro \@eqcite, which is then set left to the equation number: \documentclass{article} \usepackage{filecontents} \usepackage[backend=biber]{biblatex} \addbibresource{biblatex-examples.bib} \makeatletter \newcommand*{\eqcite}[1]{% ...


1

First here is how to do it with multibib, followed by an approach with multibbl: \documentclass{article} \usepackage[labeled,resetlabels]{multibib} \newcites{L}{Links} \begin{document} Text, etc. \cite{art} and \citeL{link} \bibliographystyle{plain} \bibliography{References} \bibliographystyleL{plain} \bibliographyL{Links} \end{document} To do ...


1

Use \parencite[e.g.][]{IngerEtAl2006using} instead of \textcite in parentheses. And don't use \\\\ if you don't want tons of "underfull hbox" messages. Enlarge \parskip if you want more space between paragraphs.


1

A comment up front: The ksfh_nat bibliography style appears to be quite buggy. For instance, in the example below, you'll see that for entries of type @article the issue number rather than the volume number is shown. Yikes! Assuming you want to keep using this style, though, and merely want to replace the alphabetical sorting order for the typeset entries ...


1

Your key needs to include only allowed characters such as regular letters, numbers etc. For example: \documentclass{beamer} \usetheme{default} \begin{document} \begin{frame} Einstein-Maxwell field equation\dots \cite{tolman1939} \end{frame} \begin{frame}[allowframebreaks] \frametitle<presentation>{Bibliography} ...


1

Here's a way to get what I believe you're looking for. \begin{filecontents*}{\jobname.bib} @preamble{"\DeclareRobustCommand{\firstsecond}[2]{#2}"} @misc{WB:2014, author = {{\firstsecond{World Bank}{The World Bank}}}, title = {Life expectancy}, year = {2014}, note = {data retrieved from World Development Indicators, ...


1

When the natbib package is loaded, \cite acts as a synonym for \citet ("textual citation"). If you want the "parenthentical citation" look, change \cite to \citep.


1

To take into account every possible situation, I patched the original definition of the \cite command in numeric-comp.cbx: \documentclass{article} \usepackage{filecontents} \begin{filecontents}{\jobname.bib} @article{article1, author = {Author, First}, title = {Title 1}, year = 1993, month = may, pages = {10--15} } ...


1

We can use the powerful capabilities of xparse and l3regex: \begin{filecontents*}{\jobname.bib} @article{my:paper1, author={BCP, X.}, title={My paper 1}, journal={J.}, year={2014}, } @article{my:paper2, author={BCP, X.}, title={My paper 2}, journal={J.}, year={2015}, } @article{paper1, author={Uthor, A.}, title={Not my paper 1}, journal={J.}, ...


1

(This is a compilation of some of the comments I provided when the query was first posted.) Since you're using the plain bibliography style, you could use either the @unpublished entry type or the catch-all @misc entry type for the paper at hand. With either of these two entry types, I suggest you use the note field to provide URL and similar information. ...


1

I later realised that I was using the natbib package after all; it was being loaded by my document class. This meant that egreg's solution did not work for me - perhaps natbib does not use the \@cite command that egreg redefined? However, the following, which is obtained by combining Mico and Timm's comments \setcitestyle{notesep={\ }} \let\oldcite\cite ...



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