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1

Maybe the simplest is to load xcolor with option svgnames: the svg colour names are the html colours names. So you can write: \begin{mdframed}[linecolor=DarkSeaGreen] text \end{mdframed} To use the HTML hexacimal code, you first have to define your colour: \documentclass{article} \usepackage[utf8]{inputenc} \usepackage[svgnames]{xcolor} ...


0

I don't understand why, but messing around, changing the \lfoot{} line from \lfoot{{\color{blue}Build}} to \lfoot{\textcolor{blue}{Build}} Produced the result, Still I figured I would share the result.


1

Although not an elegant way, I finally got a solution to avoid the fill in table caption by using caption package and \addtablecounter command. I removed the \caption command inside the longtabu environment and used \addtablecounter to subtract the table count and used \captionof command to create caption outside the longtabu environment. Can somebody ...


1

The problem is that pgfcirctripoles.sty defines the path of the shape and then draws it independently of your options, instead of just declaring the path and not using it. If you modify the definition of the or ports in line 498 of pgfcirctripoles.sty as follows: \pgfcircdeclarelogicport{or}{ \pgfpathmoveto{\pgfpoint {\pgf@circ@res@left} ...


3

It seems, the whole entry should be colored blue. Therefore the following example redefines \bibitem to look for nature. If it is found, the entry is set in blue. This way, bibtex is not confused by color markup inside bibliography entries. \RequirePackage{filecontents} \begin{filecontents*}{myReference.bib} @article{nature, author = {Rosa Rademakers and ...


17

I guess this is "proof-of-concept" rather than any kind of practical solution (it certainly isn't practical). It does some rather naughty stuff with low level PDF literals: \documentclass[border=5]{standalone} \usepackage{tikz} \usetikzlibrary{fadings} \tikzset{ outline text/.style={ execute at begin node={% \pgfsetfillopacity{0}% ...


6

I have found examples in the TikZ & PGF manual that may help you. I have edited the two examples I found. The first picture is based on an example in section 23.4.1 Creating Fadings, the other two is based on an example in section 23.5 Transparency Groups in the TikZ & PGF manual.          Unfortunately, the ...


9

Very likely the color setting is inside a section (or friend) title and the title goes into the header with uppercase letters. \MakeUppercase (or \uppercase) does not know the semantics of arguments, it just converts all letters to uppercase: \textcolor{black}{hello} becomes \textcolor{BLACK}{HELLO}. Workarounds: Providing a definition for the uppercase ...


1

simply overwrite the colours craneorange and craneblue of the colour theme by whatever you like \documentclass{beamer} \mode<presentation> { \usetheme{Warsaw} \usecolortheme{crane} } \definecolor{craneorange}{rgb}{0.68,1,1} \definecolor{craneblue}{gray}{0.85} \begin{document} \begin{frame} test \end{frame} \end{document}


3

use \newcommand{\green}[1]{\textcolor{green}{#1}}


2

Another option is the use of clip command to fill the particular areas, displayed below. Need the scope environment to limit the operation of filling, or it will take effect from thereafter. EDIT: Well, a much simpler way is to fill the shape directly as such. Replace the scope codes with the following code. the coordinate 1.7 is determined by ...


3

You can do this using a blend group (c.f. Section 23.3 of the pgf manual v3.0.0), which mixes the colors according to a specified blending mode. The possible modes are outlined in the manual, but screen or lighten are probably most appropriate for your desired output. This approach flattens items drawn inside the group, so I used a slightly different ...


1

According to this post on SO: http://stackoverflow.com/questions/2865581/changing-the-colour-of-textbullet-in-latex-beamer The best solution is: \setbeamercolor*{item}{fg=color} Another one but lower interest: \setbeamercolor{itemize item}{fg=color} % all frames will have red bullets \begin{frame} \begin{itemize} \item First item. \item ...


4

You don't have to use xcolor to color cells of a table. Just load the package colortbl. \documentclass{article} \usepackage{colortbl} %use in the preamble \begin{document} \begin{table}[h] \begin{tabular}{|c|c|c|}\hline H1 & H2 & H3 \\\hline \cellcolor{red} I am colored & I am not & \cellcolor{green} I too am\\\hline ...


1

The trick used here is that I define my page-numbers colour as a variable. Like this, I am able to switch it wherever I want. I define it as black by default. In front of the partial TOC, I do a \colorlet{MyColor}{white} which switches to your desired colour (here white) and after the partial TOC, I switch it back to black. The last switch is not needed in ...


1

It is not the matter of color. With the same color a vertical shift is also visible. But now \vfill stabilizes the equation. (Without the picture, but one can easily verify). \documentclass{beamer} \usepackage{bm} \usepackage{color} % Just some newcommands. \newcommand{\msum}[2][]{\sum \limits_{#2}^{#1}} ...


2

You can use \color instead of \textcolor. The main advantage is that \color is overlay-aware, which means you can obtain the same result without repeating your text: you can use {\color<1>{white} text...} to have the text colored in white only on first overlay. And as a nice side-effect (probably some magic), the content no longer moves between ...


1

The question How to color only a tilde accent was closed as "Duplicate" improper. There is very interesting problem which isn't solved in mentioned post nor here. When you return back to the black color in the nucleus of mathaccent atom, then this color manipulation needs \special or \pdfliteral and the skewchar correction of accent placement is lost. See ...


0

I finally found it, see the link below : How to color over/underline, or other ways to highlight substituted expressions in proofs? and change \overline in the newcommand by \widetilde or any accent you want.


5

Changing color is not really supported, so you lose some metric information and a manual correction could be needed in some cases: \documentclass{article} \usepackage{mathtools,xcolor} \newcommand{\colorwt}[2][2]{% {}\mspace{#1mu}\mathrlap{\textcolor{red}{\widetilde{\phantom{#2}}}}% \mspace{-#1mu}#2% } \begin{document} ...


3

Quite simply: $\textcolor{red}{\widetilde{\textcolor{black}{E\,}}}²!^w $ I had to make a small correction to have a correct positioning of the accent, though.


1

Grouping does the work: \documentclass{article} \usepackage{color} \begin{document} ${\color{green}\widetilde{\color{black}{E}}}^w$ \end{document}


1

There seems to be no way of doing this, as per the pdfpages documentation. However, it does mention how to change the background page color. The workaround you mentioned is perhaps the easiest way to deal with it: print your document to .pdf (say, with PDFCreator) in gray-scale and then normally \includepdf it.


8

tabulary detects colortbl and inserts modified definitions for that case, but \cellcolor was "recently" added to colortbl in 2001: and tabulary wasn't updated to match. % \changes{v0.1j}{2001/02/13}{\cs{cellcolor} (Donald Arseneau)} \documentclass[a4paper]{article} \usepackage{colortbl} \usepackage{tabulary} \usepackage{etoolbox} \begin{document} ...


5

The command \rowcolors{}{}{} has to be situated inside your table environment. % arara: pdflatex \documentclass{article} \usepackage[table,rgb,hyperref]{xcolor} \usepackage{hhline} \usepackage{multirow} \usepackage{amsmath} \begin{document} \begin{table}[h] \rowcolors{2}{white}{gray!25} \centering \begin{tabular}{cccc} \hline ...


1

The following code solves the plotting problem for tables like the one in your example. The solution applies \addplot twice for each point: once for the fill and another time for the draw colour. \documentclass[10pt,a4paper,landscape]{article} \usepackage{pgfplots} \begin{document} \begin{tikzpicture} \begin{axis} \pgfplotstableread[row sep = \\]{ ...


8

Package fancyhdr puts the elements of the footer into a \parbox[t]. At the beginning You are using \color{...}. It does not start a new paragraph, thus the first top element of the \parbox[t] is the color whatsit (\special). It is aligned with the base line of the other entries. A then goes below the color whatsit. Solution: The color whatsit should go into ...


5

The easiest way, if you don't need other changes to the typesetting of section titles, is with sectsty: \documentclass{book} \usepackage{sectsty,xcolor} \sectionfont{\color{blue}} \begin{document} \tableofcontents \section{A section title} \end{document}


6

Here is another tcolorbox answer. I tried to mimic the colors and design of your example. Additionally, I used a numbered environment which you may want to have. Note that you should use the most recent version of tcolorbox, i.e. 3.05 (2014/05/28). \documentclass[11pt]{report} \usepackage[explicit]{titlesec} \usepackage[usenames,dvipsnames]{pstricks} ...


3

You can use : \usepackage{tcolorbox} \tcbuselibrary{breakable} And custom everything with the multiple options of this package. \documentclass[11pt]{report} \usepackage[explicit]{titlesec} \usepackage[usenames,dvipsnames]{pstricks} \usepackage{amsfonts,amssymb,amsmath,enumerate,makeidx,mathrsfs,graphicx,epsfig,fancyhdr,pst-grad,pst-plot,tikz-cd,tikz} ...


3

As Kevin has already pointed out in his comment: Load the colortbl package in the preamble. In the case of LyX, it is generally a good idea to take a look into it's documentation before searching the internet: The necessary steps (including an example of using \rowcolor) are described precisely in Section 2.1.1 Colored Tables of the Embedded Objects Manual, ...


1

In LyX insert a \usepackage[table]{xcolor} into Document->Preferences->Preamble (Preamble is on the lower left side)



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