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1

An alternative: use of orthogonal coordinate Code \documentclass[border=10pt,varwidth]{standalone} \usepackage{tikz} \usepackage[american,siunitx]{circuitikz} \usetikzlibrary{calc,positioning} \begin{document} An alternative solution \begin{circuitikz} \draw (0,0) node[op amp](opamp){} (opamp.out) to[short,*-o] (2,0)node[]{} node[right]{$v_{out}$}; ...


0

\draw let \p1=(opamp.out),\p2=(opamp.-) in (opamp.-) to [short,*-] ++(0,1) node{} to [R,l=$R_2$] ++($(\x1,0)-(\x2,0)$); Note that you have to \usetikzlibrary{calc}. The let syntax let you alias the points with names \p1 ... \pN, where N is the number of points. Then, after in, you could access points' coordinates with the syntax \x1 .. \xN and \y1 .. \yN ...


3

Something like this? \documentclass{standalone} \usepackage{tikz} \usetikzlibrary{positioning} \usepackage{mwe} \begin{document} \begin{tikzpicture} \node[anchor=south west,inner sep=0] (image) at (0,0) {\includegraphics[width=0.55\textwidth]{example-image}}; \node[anchor=south west,inner sep=0,right=5mm of image, draw=red, ultra thick] (image-b) ...


3

If you're looking for an arbitrary coordinate around the perimeter you can use (name.number), where name is the shape name and number is an angle in degrees measured from name.east. \documentclass[border=2mm]{standalone} \usepackage{tikz} \usetikzlibrary{shapes.geometric,plotmarks} \begin{document} \begin{tikzpicture} \node[name=s, shape=regular polygon, ...


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Defining new anchors is tricky and basically impossible without looking at the PGF code used to define the shape. But aliasing anchors is quite straightforward (once you have the command to do it): \documentclass[tikz,border=5]{standalone} \usetikzlibrary{shapes.geometric} \makeatletter \def\pgfaliasanchor#1#2#3{% \expandafter\gdef\csname ...


3

I received two great answers to my question and ended using parts of both of them, which is why I thought a complete cover page template in which people just insert their background image and title information might be helpful: \documentclass[a4paper]{article} \usepackage[svgnames]{xcolor} \usepackage{tikz} \begin{document} \tikzset{page cs/.cd, x/.store ...


2

This is probably not the most efficient method but I understand it ;). The following image shows the adjusted placement together with a line of small, red circles which I used to figure out the placement. Obviously you'd delete the circles before use. I've switched to a larger font with less scaling since the default fonts differ according the their size ...


4

Since the image is scaled so that it covers the entire page, then all that is required is the width and the height of the paper to set the shift and the scale transformations. This could be done using the shift, x and y keys but I have defined a custom page cs coordinate system so that it is possible to use coordinates like (1,1) in the usual way: ...


3

You need to protect the math operation with braces. Then your code works as is (after removing the backslash before *) \def\radius{12cm} \begin{tikzpicture} \foreach \x in {0,10,...,350}{ \node[circle,shading=radial, inner color=white, outer color=red!15,scale=3.4] at ({\radius*cos(360-\x+90)},{\radius*sin(360-\x+90)}) {t}; } \end{tikzpicture}


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Here is a solution that is mixture of a macro seen in another answer and the pic command from TiKz 3.0. % macro taken from http://tex.stackexchange.com/a/33765 % ----------------------------------------------------- \makeatletter \newcommand{\gettikzxy}[3]{% \tikz@scan@one@point\pgfutil@firstofone#1\relax \edef#2{\the\pgf@x}% \edef#3{\the\pgf@y}% ...



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