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4

with enumitem you should do this: \setlist[enumerate,1]{itemsep=10pt} to change some thing globally. Your code: \documentclass[12pt, a4paper]{article} \usepackage{mathtools} \usepackage{enumitem} \usepackage{amsthm} \usepackage{amsfonts} \usepackage{amssymb} \newtheorem{theorem}{Theorem} \newtheorem{corollary}{Corollary}[theorem] ...


4

It would be more useful to post complete example that demonstrates the problem rather than fragments we can not use. But anyway you are using (but haven't said) enumitem which defines \enumerate to look for an optional argument, but then you define your command such that the command is always followed by \setlength so the optional argument is not seen. After ...


3

A quick and dirty trial solution, looping over a list using etoolbox macros and releasing it a specialized enumerate environment Description: \IntelligentEnumerate is a wrapper with three arguments: The first is optional, containing the label and other setups for the enumerate optional argument The first contains the list items as a comma-separated list ...


5

The labels are set up so that they end a certain distance from the text, so your labels are sticking out into the left margin because they are quite "wide". You can fix this by adding leftmargin=* to arguments of your enumerate environment. This makes the items line up with the left left-margin. Edit If, in addition, you want the items indented a "standard" ...


1

I have located the problem. It seems that "enumitem" clashes with the package "paralist" which was sitting on every preamble since I've started using LateX. (Many thanks for reminding me that minimal examples are required, that helped me to find the cause myself).


1

Set the way the label is formatted using the before key (mentioned in the enumitem documentation (p 4)): \documentclass{amsart} \usepackage{enumitem} \begin{document} \begin{description} \item[abc] one \item[def] two \item[ghi] three \end{description} \begin{description}[before={\renewcommand\makelabel[1]{\bfseries ##1.}}] \item[abc] one ...


4

You have to redefine \descriptionlabel, nothing that enumitem is supposed to be able to do. This is the standard definition \newcommand{\descriptionlabel}[1]{% \hspace\labelsep \upshape\bfseries #1:% } so you want to say \renewcommand{\descriptionlabel}[1]{% \hspace\labelsep \upshape\bfseries #1.% } in your document preamble. ...


2

Instead of loading the enumerate package, use the shortlabels option of enumitem to emulate that format. Then you can combine your inline item with an enumerate-type list. Unless you are using the actual inline lists (enumerate* etc.) of enumitem you don't need the inline option for this code to work. \documentclass{article} ...


2

The command \sfl should have an argument (the label); \raggedright does nothing, because the label is typeset in a \makebox, use \hfill to force left alignment. \documentclass[article]{memoir} \usepackage{polyglossia} \usepackage{siunitx} \setdefaultlanguage[variant=uk]{english} \setmainfont{Linux Libertine O} \setsansfont{Open Sans}[Scale=MatchLowercase] ...


2

Here's an option using enumitem and your own counter: \documentclass{article} \usepackage{enumitem} \newcounter{cycleenum} \newcommand{\cyclealph}[1]{% \ifcase\value{#1}% 0 \or A% 1 \or B% 2 \or C% 3 \or D% 4 \or F% 5 \or G% 6 \or H% 7 \or J% 8 \or \setcounter{#1}{1}\cyclealph{#1}% \fi} ...


4

Define a new counter representation that uses the counter's value modulo 8. The easiest way to do it is with expl3. Then with enumitem define a suitable list. \documentclass{article} \usepackage{enumitem,xparse} \newlist{nelson}{enumerate}{1} \setlist[nelson,1]{label=\nelsonalph*.,resume} \AddEnumerateCounter{\nelsonalph}{\donelsonalph}{D} ...


4

You can use series facility of enumitem \documentclass{Article} \usepackage{enumitem} \begin{document} \begin{enumerate} \item \begin{enumerate}[label=\Alph*.,series=myseries] \item foo \item foo \item foo \item foo \end{enumerate} \item \begin{enumerate}[resume*=myseries,start=6] %% start at F. \item foo \item foo \item foo \item foo \end{enumerate} ...


2

Here is an alternative using no packages. The upside is that there is nothing you can't change. The downside is that it is only one layer deep (no subitems). \documentclass[a4paper,10pt]{article} \newcounter{steps} \newcommand{\step}[1][\empty]% #1 = label (optional) {\stepcounter{steps}% \par \hangindent=4em \hangafter=1 ...


3

How about this code, using xparse and, incidentally, xspace: \documentclass[a4paper,10pt]{article} \usepackage{enumitem} \usepackage{xspace} \usepackage{xparse} \DeclareDocumentCommand\newstep{o}{% \item\IfNoValueTF{#1}{}{#1 \textendash\xspace}} \newlist{steps}{enumerate}{1} \setlist[steps]{label=\textit{Step \arabic*:},leftmargin=*} \begin{document} ...


1

Here is a solution: \documentclass{article} \usepackage{enumitem} \begin{document} \begin{enumerate}[label*=\arabic*.,wide =0pt, labelindent = 1em, leftmargin =*] \item First Text text text. Text text text.Text text text. Text text text. Text text text. Text text text.Text text text. Text text text. \begin{enumerate}[label*=\arabic*.,align = left] ...


7

Try setting your own alignment to something that contains the enumeration in a fixed-width box. This way you can specify the location to suit your needs: \documentclass{article} \usepackage{enumitem} \SetLabelAlign{fixedwidth}{\hss\llap{\makebox[2.5em][l]{#1}}} \setlist[enumerate]{label*=\arabic*.,leftmargin=0pt,align=fixedwidth} \begin{document} ...



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