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Use eqnarray* instead of eqnarray to get an unnumbered multiline equation structure. However, you really shouldn't be using either eqnarray or eqnarray* -- both environments have been seriously deprecated for many years. Instead, use align and align*, respectively. For more in-depth references on this subject, see the posting eqnarray vs align. One of the ...


3

The first thing to try is, of course, reducing the arrow lengths. If all else fails, use \mathclap that, however, requires ampersand replacement; or enclose the diagram in an lrbox. I'll show all three possibilities. \documentclass[12pt,a4paper]{article} \usepackage{mathtools} \usepackage{tikz-cd} \newsavebox{\wideeqbox} \newcommand{\sample}{Lorem ipsum ...


3

My answer http://tex.stackexchange.com/a/136374/15925 may be adapted to introduce a command \cmdcol for material to be centered in a column in display math in alignat and related environments: \documentclass{book} \usepackage{mathtools} \numberwithin{equation}{section} \makeatletter \newcommand{\cmdcol}[1]{\omit\hfil\strut@ \( \m@th\displaystyle #1 ...


2

Your idea with array is good, but needs some refinement. However, I wouldn't set the equation number above the equals sign, but on the side. I'll show both ways. \documentclass{book} \usepackage{amsmath,array} \newcolumntype{R}{>{\displaystyle}r} \newcolumntype{C}{>{\displaystyle{}}c<{{}}} \newcolumntype{L}{>{\displaystyle}l} ...


2

You have better ways of colouring an equation. See for example: this question and its answers. I have used empheq in my example. With tcolorbox, you can be more fancier. Now the real problem. The following code works with the help of marginnote package. \documentclass{book} \usepackage{mathtools} \usepackage{xcolor} ...


2

You can try writing the arrow in a resize box $x_{\uparrow}$ $x_{\resizebox{0.1cm}{0.1cm}{{$\uparrow$}}}$


1

The scalerel package allows you to scale one object to the same vertical extent as another. Furthermore, it obeys changing math sizes. So here, I define \onearrow as an arrow scaled to the local height of a "1". It works automatically in all math sizes. \documentclass{minimal} \usepackage{scalerel} \def\onearrow{{\scalerel*{\uparrow}{1}}} ...


1

You can get a smaller size uparrow using \scriptscriptstyle $x_{1} 1 \uparrow x_{\scriptscriptstyle\uparrow}$ I can't judge if this is a more aesthetically pleasing result, though.



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