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6

By putting extra newlines (\\) it is expected to get extra vertical spaces between the equations. Simply remove the extra \\ and complete as this example: \documentclass[12pt,a4paper]{article} \usepackage{amsmath} \begin{document} \begin{equation*} \boxed{ \begin{split} y = x^2 + x -2 \\[-.1cm] % adjust the value as you wish y = x^2 + x -2 \\[-.1cm] y = ...


5

Never pile up font package loading. The fourier package uses math fonts with a different encoding from the standard, so it changes several slot positions. On the other hand, the lxfonts use the standard encodings for math symbols, so loading fourier will have strange effects like the one you're describing. By the way, your package loading order is a bit ...


4

Use align, or if you want only one number use aligned inside an equation. \documentclass{article} \usepackage{mathtools} \begin{document} \begin{align} e^{-\lambda T} &= ( 1 - \log S_j^* (T))^{\frac{1}{1-\theta}} \\ - \lambda T &= \dfrac{1}{1-\theta} \log ( 1 - \log S_j^*(t)) \\ T &= \dfrac{1}{\lambda (\theta-1)} \log ( 1 - \log S_j^*(t)) ...


4

\documentclass{article} \usepackage{amsmath} \begin{document} \begin{equation} a\Bigl[\frac{d\cos y}{e} + \overbrace{\frac{b\sin x}{c}}^{\text{second bit}}\Bigr] \end{equation} \end{document}


4

Something like this with tikz. \documentclass{article} \usepackage{mathpazo} \usepackage{amsmath} \usepackage{tikz} \usetikzlibrary{matrix,arrows.meta} \begin{document} \begin{tikzpicture}[semithick,>=Latex] \matrix (m)[matrix of math nodes,column sep=2cm,row sep=1cm] { \frac{2}{3}\sinh{\frac{3}{2}t} & ...


4

It's simple with tikz-cd: \documentclass{article} \usepackage{mathpazo} \usepackage{amsmath,mathtools} \usepackage{tikz-cd} \begin{document} \[ \begin{tikzcd} \frac{2}{3}\sinh{\frac{3}{2}t} \arrow[r,leftrightarrow] \arrow[d,"e^{-\frac{t}{2}}"] & \frac{2}{3}\left[\dfrac{\frac{3}{2}}{s^{2}-\frac{9}{4}}\right] \arrow[d,"s\to s+\frac{1}{2}"] \\ ...


3

If amsmath is used then \iftagsleft@ is true or not. For article and other classes, you need to check the definition of \@eqnnum or you could use \@ifl@aded{clo}{leqno}{yes}{no}


3

Use gathered: \documentclass{article} \usepackage{amsmath} \usepackage{feynmp-auto} % or feynmf \begin{document} \begin{fmffile}{test} \begin{equation} \begin{gathered} \begin{fmfgraph*}(65,50) \fmfleft{i1,i2} \fmfright{o1,o2} \fmf{plain}{i1,v,o1} \fmf{plain}{i2,v,o2} \end{fmfgraph*} \end{gathered}=-i\lambda \end{equation} \end{fmffile} \end{document} ...


2

Use the alignat environment. By the way, there exists a pmatrix environment that makes typing shorter and cleaner: \documentclass[a4paper, 11pt]{book} \usepackage[utf8]{inputenc} \usepackage{fourier} \usepackage{mathtools} \begin{document} \begin{alignat}{2} a &= b &+ \begin{pmatrix}c & x \\ c & x \end{pmatrix} & \\ d &= e ...


2

min should be \min (never use math italic for multi-letter identifiers) and b^{'} should be b' and no need for \substack if you only have one line in the subscript. but other than that, the equation fits in a two column IEEE document: \documentclass{IEEEtran} \usepackage{amsmath} \begin{document} \noindent X\dotfill X \begin{equation} \label{eq:3} \min ...


1

I've noticed that the subscript material below the summation symbols is wide enough to extend to the left and right of the summation symbols. TeX inserts extra whitespace so as to avoid any overlap with the surrounding. If you're really pressed for space, you could use the macro \smashoperator (or its relative, \smathoperator[r]) to suppress this whitespace. ...


1

You can have a simple syntax with DeclareMathDelimiter, from the mathtools package: I define a \brparen command that allows for line breaks and alignment points, and adapts to its contents either with an optional argument (\big, \Big, &c.) or with a star version (equivalent to a pair of left … \right): \documentclass{article} \usepackage[utf8]{inputenc} ...


1

There a \big, \Big, \bigg, and \Bigg: \begin{equation} \begin{split} A = & \Big( \frac{a}{3} + B + \\ & + c + d \Big) \end{split} \end{equation}


1

You can often literally smash the part which fiddles with your desired height :) \documentclass{article} \usepackage{amsmath} \begin{document} \begin{equation} a\left[\frac{d\cos y}{e} + \smash{\overbrace{\frac{b\sin x}{c}}^{\text{second bit}}}\right] \end{equation} \end{document} This comes closer to the posted intended output than David's answer, ...



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