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3

you should really have posted these as two separate questions, instead of adding on to the first. but you could try \documentclass{article} \usepackage{amsmath} \begin{document} \begin{equation} \mathbf{q}=(\mu_1, \mu_2, \ldots ,\mu_{n-2}, \mu_n )^{\text{T}} \label{2} \end{equation} and \begin{equation} L = \log(l) = ...


5

Example, how this can be typeset: \documentclass[a5paper]{article} \usepackage{amsmath} \newcommand*{\transpose}{\mathrm{T}} \newcommand*{\vc}[1]{\mathhbf{#1}} % \vec and \vector are already defined \begin{document} \begin{equation} \label{q-def} \vc{q} = (\mu_1, \mu_2, \dots, \mu_{n-1}, \mu_{n})^\transpose \end{equation} Equation~\eqref{q-def} ...


3

I do not see the benefit of using such complicated equation numbers. Numbering equations within sections is more than enough IMHO. Nevertheless, the additional level can be suppressed, if the subsection counter is zero. Also \numberwithin does not define a transitive closure. Thus the equation number needs to be reset for each \section, too. ...


2

Using \numberwithin{equation}{subsection} changes the counter output format and shifts the resetting of the equation counter from section to subsection level (i.e. each time \stepcounter{subsection} is used. However, this means that an orphane equation after a \section, but before \subsection will just use the old counter value, from a previous equation. ...


2

Use the package chngcntr: In your preamble: \usepackage{chngcntr} In the Introduction section: \counterwithout{equation}{chapter} After the Introduction section: \counterwithin{equation}{chapter}


3

\renewcommand\theequation{\arabic{equation}} In the intro then \renewcommand\theequation{\thesection.\arabic{equation}} at the end of the intro.


1

With fancyvrb package you can get it \documentclass{article} \usepackage{lipsum} \usepackage{fancyvrb} \newsavebox{\FVerbBox} \newenvironment{FVerbatim} {\VerbatimEnvironment \begin{center} \begin{lrbox}{\FVerbBox} \begin{BVerbatim}} {\end{BVerbatim} \end{lrbox} \mbox{\usebox{\FVerbBox}} \end{center}} \begin{document} \lipsum*[2] ...


3

The best, i.e., "most LaTeX-y" way to typeset this expression is to set up a macro named, say, \norm, that takes one argument -- the term(s) to be encased in double vertical bars. With the method shown in the example below, it's easy to change the size of the bars, if needed, by providing an optional argument to the \norm macro. \documentclass{article} ...


1

The amsmath package already provides the needed tools: Bmatrix for the multiline matrix with curly braces and bmatrix for the matrix with square brackets. \documentclass[a4paper,12pt,numbers=noenddot]{scrartcl} \usepackage{amsmath} \begin{document} Here is an equation \begin{equation} \nabla_Q N_I = \begin{Bmatrix} N_{I,1} \\ N_{I,2} \\ N_{I,3} ...


1

Here is a way. I define an lrcases and a dlrcases environment, analogous to the (d)cases and (d)rcases environments from mathtools. The code is borrowed from @Gonzalo Medina: \documentclass{article} \usepackage[utf8]{inputenc} \usepackage{mathtools, bm} \makeatletter \newcases{dlrcases}{\quad}{% ...


2

Here you go. I could not replicate the font other than using a Sans Serif family (it appears bold in mine). Output Code \documentclass[margin=10pt]{standalone} \usepackage{tikz} \usetikzlibrary{arrows.meta,calc,positioning} \tikzset{ every node/.style={draw=gray, rounded corners, text centered,text width=3cm}, } \begin{document} ...


3

I'm not sure why the flalign environment seems to have become very fashionable. Here are two solutions, based on the alignedat inner environment. Inside the equation* or flalign* environment (if you really want left alignment) I define a local abbreviation for the labels. If you have several of these constructions, move the command in the preamble, so ...


6

I don't think there's a ready-made package for Lagrangean equations. Applying a bit more formatting -- and not using $$ in a LaTeX document -- may be desirable. I suggest using a gather* environment, with a nested alignedat environment. \documentclass{article} \usepackage{mathtools} \begin{document} \begin{gather*} \max U(x,y)\\ \shortintertext{subject ...


2

This gets (like some other answers) the proper math spacing and (unlike the other answers), gets the proper (right) alignment on the numbers, using tabular stacks. \documentclass{article} \usepackage{tabstackengine} \stackMath \setstacktabulargap{0pt} \begin{document} \[ \tabularCenterstack{rrcr}{ \textit{Angle}: & -45^{\circ} \le& \theta ...


2

the equation number was a syntax error extra { (don't ignore error messages!) You can get bold math italic using \bm from the package of the same name. Also: don't use \emph in math mode, and you do not need \limits here. \documentclass[a4paper,12pt,numbers=noenddot]{scrartcl} \usepackage{mathtools} \usepackage{bm} \begin{document} \begin{equation} ...


11

I would use alignat for multiple alignments. \documentclass{article} \usepackage{amsmath} \begin{document} \begin{alignat*}{2} \textit{Angle}: &\ & -45^{\circ} &\le \theta \le +45^{\circ} \\ \textit{Bins}: &\ & -135^{\circ} &< \theta < -45^{\circ} \\ \textit{Slant}: &\ & +45^{\circ} ...


4

You could use tabular or array instead of flalign*: \documentclass{article} \usepackage{array,amsmath} \begin{document} \begin{tabular}{r>{$}r<{$}*{4}{>{$}l<{$}}} \textit{Angle}: & -45^{\circ} & \le & \theta & \le & +45^{\circ} \\ \textit{Bins}: & -135^{\circ} & < & \theta & < & ...


4

Try: \begin{flalign*} \textit{Angle}: && -45^{\circ} &\le \theta \le +45^{\circ} \\ \textit{Bins}: && -135^{\circ} &< \theta < -45^{\circ} \\ \textit{Slant}: && +45^{\circ} &< \theta < +135^{\circ} \\ \textit{Tilt}: && -180^{\circ} &\le \theta \le -135^{\circ} \ or\ ...


2

Here you are: it is enough to use \min. I also replaced the pair of || with a \norm command, defined with the help of the mathtools package. The star version adds a pair of implicit \left … \right on both sides of the \Vert delimiters. If you want to fine-tune the size of the delimiters, use an optional argument instead, such as \norm[\big]{…} instead. ...


6

I would write \min instead of \textnormal {min} \limits, and I would use \lVert and \rVert instead of ||. \begin{equation} \lVert \mathbf{x}^{1} - \overline{\mathbf{x}}^{2} \rVert = % \min_{ \mathbf{x}^{2} \subseteq \Gamma^{2} } % \lVert \mathbf{x}^{1} - \mathbf{x}^{2} ({\pmb \xi}) \rVert \end{equation}


1

Here's a solution that uses an array environment to align the various terms. \documentclass{article} \usepackage{amsmath,array} \begin{document} \[ \setlength\arraycolsep{0pt} \begin{array}{c @{} >{{}}c<{{}} c >{{}}c<{{}} l @{{}={}} c @{} >{{}}c<{{}} l} \mathrm{B} & + & \mathrm{R} & \cdot & \mathrm{t}_1 & ...


2

One way to align the content as desired is to use a \makebox to center the text in the desired amount of space: Notes: I would highly recommend you use the siunitx package as well for typesetting anything with units. Code: \documentclass{article} \usepackage{mathtools} \usepackage{siunitx} \sisetup{output-decimal-marker={,}} ...


1

Some variations of Kormylo's answer: The cells in the left column uses an inner tabular. The second line is indented to emphasize the term in the first line. No fixed column widths. The equation numbers can be referenced, using amsmath macros for the formatting of the equation number. Full example: \documentclass{report} \usepackage[utf8]{inputenc} ...


1

You can use m-type columns and flalign for left aligning the numbered equation. Some vertical space corrections are needed, but they're hidden in a macro, so you don't need to specify them each time. \documentclass{report} \usepackage[T1]{fontenc} \usepackage[utf8]{inputenc} \usepackage[ngerman]{babel} \usepackage[intlimits]{amsmath} ...


1

The p{6cm} is equivalent to \parbox[t]{6cm}, but \parbox[c]{6cm} would do better for this. Nor do you really need a display math environment when $\displaystyle ...$ will do. Especially, if you put the equation number into its own column. \documentclass{report} \usepackage[intlimits]{amsmath} \usepackage{here} \usepackage{floatflt} ...


0

Here is a way. I used threeparttable in order to have the caption left-aligned w.r.t. the table. Off topic: you shouldn't load here since float defines an H option. \documentclass{report} \usepackage[utf8]{inputenc} \usepackage{lmodern} \usepackage[german]{babel} \usepackage[showframe, nomarginpar]{geometry} \usepackage[intlimits]{mathtools} ...


6

Square roots are very sensitive to ascenders and descenders. Just look at the two of them and you'll realize that the culprit is the j in the second one: \documentclass{article} \begin{document} \begin{equation} x_{ij} = \frac{ \sum_{t}{e_i(t)e_j(t)} } { \sqrt{\sum_t{e_{i\vphantom{j}}^2(t)}} \sqrt{\sum_t{e_j^2(t)}} ...


7

\documentclass{article} \begin{document} \begin{equation} x_{ij} = \frac{ \sum_{t}{e_i(t)e_j(t)} } { \sqrt{\strut\sum_t{e_i^2(t)}} \sqrt{\strut\sum_t{e_j^2(t)}} } \end{equation} \end{document}


1

More of a workaround than a regular answer to your question: using \limits. \documentclass{article} \begin{document} \begin{equation} x_{ij} = \frac{ \sum\limits_{t}{e_i(t)e_j(t)} } { \sqrt{\sum\limits_t{e_i^2(t)}} \sqrt{\sum\limits_t{e_j^2(t)}} } \end{equation} ...


3

Perhaps you can use an extensible harpoon that is has a width proportionate to the other content: \documentclass{article} \usepackage{mathtools,graphicx,accents} \newcommand{\vect}[1]{\accentset{\xrightharpoonup{\hphantom{\scalebox{.4}{$#1$}}}}{#1}} \begin{document} \[ \vect{L^2((0,T);W^{1,2}(\Omega)')} \] \end{document} The content is scaled to 40% ...


2

For line numbering to be done correctly the math environments has to be wrapped using the \begin{linenomath*} and \end{linenomath*} code: \documentclass[12pt]{article} \usepackage{amsmath} \usepackage{lineno} \linenumbers \begin{document} For line numbering to be done correctly the math environments has to be wrapped using the ''linenomath`` code as ...


2

\documentclass[journal]{IEEEtran} \usepackage{amsmath} \usepackage{lipsum} \usepackage{stfloats} \begin{document} \title{\huge equation position control in two column paper} \maketitle \enlargethispage{-2cm} \section{First} \label{first} \begin{picture}(0,0) \put(0,-600){\hspace{-\parindent}\parbox{\textwidth}{% \hrulefill \vspace*{4pt} \normalsize ...


0

A possible better way to set your equation: \documentclass{article} \usepackage{amsmath,mathtools} \usepackage{braket,graphicx} \newcommand\pder[2][]{% \frac{\partial#1\mathstrut}{\partial #2}% } \newcommand\roteq{\mathpalette\doroteq\relax} \newcommand\doroteq[2]{% \rotatebox[origin=c]{90}{$#1=$}% } \renewcommand\vec[1]{\mathbf{#1}} ...


3

Here, I provide \undereq{} to be used in the \underbrace subscript. \documentclass{article} \usepackage{amsmath,stackengine,graphicx} \stackMath \newcommand\undereq[1]{% \stackunder[2pt]{\mkern1mu\rotatebox{90}% {$\scriptstyle=\mkern-3mu$}}{\scriptstyle \mathstrut#1}% } \begin{document} \[ = ...


1

This should get you going. I've introduced a few commands to make it easier to typeset some parts of the equations in a more automated way, or if you wish to change something all over the document at once. *They're not strictly necessary for the obtained result. \documentclass{article} \usepackage{amsmath,mathtools} \newcommand\partt[1][]{% \ifmmode ...


0

The equation environment (including equation*) already centres its contents, so there's no need for center. Additionally, center adds vertical space, as discussed in [When should we use \begin{center} instead of \centering?]When should we use \begin{center} instead of \centering?) Only use \begin{equation*} <stuff> \end{equation*} If you need to ...


5

The large space is due to the center environment, which adds vertical unneeded space and does nothing useful, since equation center its contents by default. So, simply remove the center environment. MWE \documentclass{article} \usepackage{amsmath,amssymb} \begin{document} \textbf{Solution} \begin{equation*} (1+x)(1+y)\geqslant{4} \end{equation*} ...


1

\begin{tabular}{ccc} 1 & 2 & 3 \ \ 6 & 7 & 8 \end{tabular} You will get 1 2 3 6 7 8 so you can write down B,R and R_max in the first line as you said and want and others in the second.


1

You can place the equations in an array, see http://en.wikibooks.org/wiki/LaTeX/Mathematics#Matrices_and_arrays For instance \begin{matrix} -1 & 3 \\ 2 & -4 \end{matrix} = \begin{matrix*}[r] -1 & 3 \\ 2 & -4 \end{matrix*} will produce


3

Trying to center the quote while placing the number on the right was too difficult using the list environment, so I used a \parbox instead. The main difference is that a \parbox will not break at the end of a page. \documentclass[a4paper,11pt,oldfontcommands]{memoir} \usepackage{pdfpages} \usepackage{tikz} \usetikzlibrary{positioning} ...


3

Here is a colorful suggestion using tcolorbox. \documentclass[a4paper,11pt,oldfontcommands]{memoir} \usepackage[most]{tcolorbox} \usepackage{showframe} \usepackage[colorlinks=true]{hyperref} \newtcolorbox[auto counter,number within=section]{myquote}[2][]{% colback=red!5!white,colframe=red!75!black,fonttitle=\bfseries, enlarge left by=1cm,enlarge right by ...


5

This will get you started. You can modify it for different numbering (e.g by section as 1.1, 1.2 etc change the within=none to within=section). This example has a table of quotes with page numbers. You can easily modify it so you have no quote caption (or only a caption within the table of quotes), and have a different layout with the number on the right ...


3

You could use an aligned environment inside an equation environment. \documentclass{article} \usepackage{amsmath} % for 'aligned' environment \begin{document} \begin{equation} \begin{aligned} \dot{R}&=\frac{66}{364}\, P_R+ \frac{\partial V}{\partial P_R} &\qquad \dot{\theta}&=2P_{\theta}\Bigl(\frac{13}{168r^2}-\frac{33}{364R^2}\Bigr) ...


2

Instead of all those math ($…$) and center environments, and since you do not seem to wish any particular alignment, I would recommand an equation environment combined with a gathered environment (with a bit of additional vertical space here between the two lines, but it's not mandatory) from the amsmath package. It does the same job, but much more shortly ...


4

If you want to have some more alignment than you have right now I would recommend the following approach: % arara: pdflatex \documentclass{article} \usepackage{mathtools} \begin{document} \begin{equation} \begin{alignedat}{2} \dot{R}&=\frac{66}{364}\,P_R+ \frac{\partial V}{\partial P_R} \qquad ...


1

Here is one way, using a stack. The top set are your originals; the bottom set are my replacement, "without changing their format," as requested. \documentclass{article} \usepackage{stackengine} \stackMath \begin{document} \begin{center} $\dot{R}=\frac{66}{364}\ P_R+ \frac{\partial V}{\partial P_R}\qquad ...


0

The reason for seeing references only on a per-chapter basis is the following: you have not set a master document. In order to do so, open the main .tex file in Texmaker (the one with all the input/includes of all your chapters). Then select Options / Define Current Document as "Master Document".


2

You also can play with arraycolsep: \documentclass[11pt]{beamer} \usetheme{Warsaw} \usepackage[utf8]{inputenc} \usepackage{amsmath,adjustbox,mathtools} \usepackage{amsfonts} \usepackage{amssymb} \usepackage{graphicx} \begin{document} \begin{frame} \frametitle{LU Factorization of A} \begin{equation}\setlength\arraycolsep{3.25pt} \mathbf{LU} = ...


1

You can use \resizebox to scale the equation. Remember to re-enter math mode after it. \documentclass[11pt]{beamer} \usetheme{Warsaw} \usepackage[utf8]{inputenc} \usepackage{amsmath,adjustbox,mathtools} \usepackage{amsfonts} \usepackage{amssymb} \usepackage{graphicx} \begin{document} \begin{frame} \frametitle{LU Factorization of A} ...


3

For example, as noted in my comment, one could replace all \left with \biggl and all \right with \biggr. There are different sizes, as well: \big, \Big, etc. that you can search for on the site. Your question will likely be marked duplicative, because the question has been asked many times, for example, here: Error while equation splitting with align ...



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