Tag Info

New answers tagged

2

Being in align or not is irrelevant: what you want is to have a handy way for splitting the description inside the parentheses. Here's how you can do with the help of mathtools (it automatically loads amsmath). \documentclass{article} \usepackage{mathtools} \DeclarePairedDelimiter{\AfterProb}{(}{)} \DeclareMathOperator{\ProbOp}{P} ...


2

I don't think you want align here: \documentclass{article} \usepackage{amsmath} \DeclareMathOperator\PP{P} \begin{document} \[ \PP\begin{pmatrix} \text{first large text} \mid {}\\ \text{second large text} \end{pmatrix} = \frac { \PP\begin{pmatrix} \text{first large text} \cap {}\\ \text{second large text} \end{pmatrix} } { \PP\begin{pmatrix} ...


1

Because the question doesn't specify the used format (LaTeX or something else) I give the format-independent answer: \def\A{$a+b=c$} \def\B{$c+d=e$} Warning: The \newcommand is LaTeX specific feature.


1

Just use \newcommand\myeqA{$a+b=c$} \newcommand\myeqB{$c+d=e$} then when you want the first to appear, use \myeqA.


4

I think you need fleqn but here all equations will be left aligned. \documentclass[fleqn]{article} \usepackage{amsmath} \usepackage{showframe} % just for demo \setlength{\mathindent}{0pt} \begin{document} \begin{equation} x=y \end{equation} \end{document} On the other hand, you can use flalign from amsmath too. \documentclass{article} ...


1

In the equation environment, you shouldn't use the $ sign(*): \begin{equation} e^{y^2/4} \end{equation} or \begin{equation} e^{\frac{1}{4} y^2} \end{equation} should work. (*) Except in such cases: \begin{equation} x=0 \text{ if $x$ and $y$ are nice people} \end{equation}


4

This should let you start. Use the aligned environment to get the equation split in two lines. MWE \documentclass[10pt,a4paper]{article} \pagestyle{plain} \usepackage{amsmath} \usepackage{amsthm} \usepackage{bm} \usepackage{IEEEtrantools} \begin{document} \begin{IEEEeqnarray*}{rCl} \Sigma^{*}(\hat{\bm{\beta}}^{S+})&= ...


4

a + not in infix position reverts to \mathord so does not get the \mathbin space, use {}: \documentclass[11pt,onecolumn]{article} \usepackage{mathtools} \begin{document} \begin{equation} \begin{split} \Phi_i=&K_{i_1}\,_{ }^{C_j}\textrm{X}^2 + K_{i_2}\,_{ }^{C_j}\textrm{Y}^2 + K_{i_3}\,_{ }^{C_j}\textrm{Z}^2 + {}\\ &K_{i_4}\,_{ ...


4

Looking for typographical beauty in a double spaced document is a lost in advance battle. You can limit the damages with something like this: \documentclass{scrreprt} \usepackage{array,tabularx} \usepackage{setspace} \newenvironment{conditions}[1][where:] {\begin{minipage}{\textwidth} \vspace*{-.5\belowdisplayskip}% \linespread{1}\selectfont #1 ...


1

I recommend defining a command to make a short form: \documentclass{article} % Partial derivative \newcommand*{\pd}[3][]{\ensuremath{\frac{\partial^{#1} #2}{\partial #3}}} \begin{document} Text: \[ \pd{u}{t}=\pd[2]{u}{x^2} \] More text. \end{document}


6

You said partial differential equation: \documentclass{article} \begin{document} \begin{equation} \frac{\partial Q}{\partial t} = \frac{\partial s}{\partial t} \end{equation} \end{document} now using physics package, extra goodies (bonus): \documentclass{article} \usepackage{physics} \begin{document} \[ \dv{Q}{t} = \dv{s}{t} \quad \dv[n]{Q}{t} = ...


5

Use \tag for getting the main number: \documentclass{article} \usepackage{amsmath} \begin{document} \begin{subequations}\label{first:main} First some separate equations \begin{equation} 1=1 \tag{\ref{first:main}} \end{equation} and another \begin{equation} 1>0 \label{first:a} \end{equation} and another \begin{equation} 1<2 \label{first:b} ...


0

I'd use \begin{align} F&=G\frac{{m_1}{m_2}}{{r^2}} \label{eq:newton_gravity} \\ F&: \mbox{ Force } \nonumber \\ ... \end{align}


6

Are you maybe looking for the following? \documentclass{article} \usepackage{amsmath} % for \text macro \usepackage{amssymb} % for \mathbb macro \begin{document} \begin{equation} \{ u_t(x,t)=u_{xx}(x,t)\}, \text{ where $\epsilon\in\mathbb{R}$ and $t>0$} \end{equation} \end{document} Alternatively, might you be looking for the following? ...


6

Please always provide complete small documents that reproduce the error, not just fragments. equation puts you in math mode so you should not use $ to re-start math mode inside that. Do not use \rm in latex (it is just for compatibility with the previous version, LaTeX2.09, which has not been released since 1992) Don't use I\!R for a double struck R use ...


0

Don't know if I got the equations right (your text was a bit confusing) but here is a working (and slightly corrected in terms of coding) version \documentclass[12pt]{article} \usepackage{amsmath} \begin{document} \begin{equation} u_{t}\left(x,t\right)=u_{xx}\left(x,t\right) \text{where}~\epsilon = \mathrm{I!R}~\text{and}~t>0 \end{equation} ...


2

You can use \intertext from amsmath or \shortintertext from mathtools. First \shortintertext: \documentclass{report} \usepackage{mathtools} \usepackage{lipsum} \begin{document} \begin{align} a + b &= c \\ \shortintertext{\lipsum*[1]} c + d &= c + (a + b ) \end{align} \end{document} and then \intertext ...


6

align will have \abovedisplayskip above the its top. You have to get rid of it. Plus since making it zero will bring the equation in the next line (display equation!) making \setlength{\abovedisplayskip}{-\baselineskip} will do the job. Further, you need to add a `\par in {\tiny [Zvezdin, Modern Magnetooptics, IOP 1999]\par} Code: ...


7

Another solution with \dcases* from mathtools \documentclass{article} \usepackage{mathtools} \begin{document} \[ x+y = \begin{dcases*} \text{true,} & if $0 < x < 5$ \\ \text{false,} & otherwise \end{dcases*} \] \end{document} Output


6

\documentclass{article} \usepackage{amsmath} \begin{document} \[ x+y = \begin{cases} \mbox{true,} & \mbox{if } 0 < x < 5 \\ \mbox{false,} & \mbox{otherwise} \end{cases} \] \end{document} would give you:


1

If you use lualatex, you can place the \limits outside of the braces: {\sum\sum}\limits_{i\neq j} However, this will throw an error if compiled with pdflatex or xelatex, then you need a \mathop: \mathop{\sum\sum}\limits_{i\neq j} If you need this more often, you can define a new mathoperator (needs amsmath), if you use the starred Version, the default ...


7

You need to enclose the two summation symbols in \mathop{} and then place \limits after that. \documentclass{article} \begin{document} \begin{equation} \frac{\mathop{\sum\sum}\limits_{i \neq j} \sum\limits_{x}\sum\limits_{y}[\pi_{x(i),y(j)} - \pi_{x(i)}\pi_{y(j)}]}{\sigma^2_X} \end{equation} \end{document}


1

There are several approaches described in the linked answer. Route from eps to output formats is the default way tex4ht deals with generated images. You shouldn't get eps images as final format, it is always converted to something which can be displayed with a browser. another way is to use some dvi to image converter such as dvipng or dvisvgm. To avoid ...


4

Here is something to start with. The basic building blocks are \left. \begin{aligned}...\end{aligned} \right\} which places a large brace to the right and no delimiter before. \documentclass{article} \usepackage{mathtools} \newcounter{mysubequations} \renewcommand{\themysubequations}{(\roman{mysubequations})} ...


3

In addition to fixing the erroneous input that's causing LaTeX to report an undefined control sequence error, viz., the lack of a space in \lbraceP -- you should (a) set up argmin as a math operator and (b) render "opt" in upright-roman rather than in math-italic mode. Incidentally, the \left and \right directives don't resize the respective parentheses ...


5

The spacing above equations is determined by the length \abovedisplayskip while the spacing below them is determined by the length \belowdisplayskip, so, modify them to achieve what you want, for example, \setlength{\abovedisplayskip}{3pt} \setlength{\belowdisplayskip}{3pt} MWE \documentclass{article} \usepackage{amssymb,amsmath,amsthm,enumitem} ...


3

Since you want a cheat sheet, I'd recommend the extract package. With a slightly different MWE: \documentclass{article} \usepackage[ active, header=false, copydocumentclass=true, generate=\jobname-Cheatsheet, extract-env={equation}, extract-cmdline={synopsis}, ]{extract} % http://ctan.org/pkg/extract \begin{extract*} % Items executed in both ...


2

I highly recommend you to look into the float package, with it comes the command \listof that can be used to generate lists of self defined floating environments. You may then define your own equation environment and use the \listof command to generate a list of equations. Here is a minimal example: \documentclass{article} \usepackage{float} ...


5

The empheq package (which loads mathtools and amsmath) can help reproduce the O.P.'s image: \documentclass{article} \usepackage{empheq} \usepackage{lipsum} \begin{document} \lipsum[2]% \begin{empheq}[right =\mathrlap{\enspace\empheqrbrace}]{align}% \shortintertext{with respect to point $B$: } &aP_{1}-2aN_{c}+3aP_{2} = 0 \notag\\[-1ex]\\[-1ex] ...


0

A simple way to move the equation to the left margin is to insert the command \displayindent=-103ptbetween \begin{equation} and \left. (Maybe you will have to play with the exact number.) Disadvantage: the number of the equation will also move to the left.


5

Please test your code before posting. If I remove the obvious errors such as starting math mode with \[ inside the multline math environment then it mostly fitted on a page except for the first three long equations. iused gathered here for those, but split or aligned are alternatives. I also used align for the main list rather than multline and used ...


2

Use the standalone document class: MWE \documentclass[border=2pt]{standalone} \usepackage{mathtools} \begin{document} $ n_i = \begin{vmatrix} p_1^1 & p_1^2 & \dots & p_1^{i - 1} & 1 & p_1^{i + 1} & \dots & p_1^D \\ p_2^1 & p_2^2 & \dots & p_2^{i - 1} & 1 & p_2^{i + 1} & \dots & ...


6

You can also modify the length \jot if you don't want to manually specify the skips for each line. For example \setlength{\jot}{10pt} If you want the change to be localised to that equation, insert the line inside the equation environment, as in the following example \documentclass{article} \usepackage{mathtools} \begin{document} an equation with more ...


5

You can manually add a vertical distance to each line-break. I hope, this is what you want. % arara: pdflatex \documentclass{article} \usepackage{mathtools} \begin{document} \setcounter{equation}{2} \begin{equation} \begin{aligned} T_{P} &= K_{T}. \rho . n^{2}_{p} . D^{4}_{p} \\[1pt] Q_{P} &= K_{Q}. \rho . n^{2}_{p} . D^{5}_{p} ...


4

Actually, \[...\] is not a replacement or shorthand for $$...$$. It's preferred due to improved vertical spacing; see Why is \[ … \] preferable to $$ … $$?. Also, eqnarray does not provide the best horizontal spacing around operators. If shorthand is what you're after, then you could use \be...\ee as an alternative to \begin{eqnarray*}...\end{eqnarray*} ...


3

If you want it in math mode, you can use array \documentclass{article} \usepackage{amsmath} \begin{document} \[ \begin{array}{cc} \text{XXXXX} & \text{(ZZZZZZZZZZZZ)} \\\cline{1-1} \text{YYYYYYYY} \end{array} \] \end{document}


4

It's not clear what you're asking, but it seems you're abusing math mode: \documentclass{article} \begin{document} \begin{center} \begin{tabular}[t]{@{}c@{}} XXXXX \\ \hline YYYYYYYY \end{tabular} (ZZZZZZZZZZZZ) \end{center} \end{document}


4

The environment align from amsmath does precisely what you need. Place & before each equal sign to mark the alignment point, and add \\ at the end of each line but the last to mark a new equation beginning. \documentclass[12pt,a4paper]{article} \usepackage[a4paper, total={6in, 8in}]{geometry} \usepackage[utf8]{inputenc} \usepackage[T1]{fontenc} ...


1

This is happening because pandoc is interpreting (@) signs as list markers, specifically an ordered list enclosed in parentheses. As can be seen if you inspect the latex output of pandoc: Input: (@) $$(K_{0}^{-1}x)^{T}E(K_{1}^{-1}x')=0$$ Output: \begin{enumerate} \def\labelenumi{(\arabic{enumi})} \item \[(K_{0}^{-1}x)^{T}E(K_{1}^{-1}x')=0\] ...


3

I'd use multline environment from amsmath for this. \documentclass{sig-alternate} \usepackage{amsmath} \begin{document} \begin{multline} \label{eq:likelihood} P(Keyword\mid Seg_i)= \frac{1}{\sqrt{2\pi\sigma_i^{2}}}\\ \times\exp^{\frac{-(tf(Seg_i,Keyword)*idf(Seg_i,Keyword)-\mu_i)^{2}}{2\sigma_i^{2}}} \end{multline} \end{document} Output I don't know ...


2

I'd give the \splitfrac macro, which is provided by the mathtools package, a try. It can be used in both the numerator and the denominator of a fraction expressions. As the following example shows, \splitfrac macros can be nested. \documentclass[a4paper,twoside,twocolumn,final]{article} \setlength\textwidth{42.5pc} \setlength\columnsep{1.5pc} ...


1

It isn't automatic, but it works. It \rlaps an \fbox. \documentclass{beamer} \usepackage{amsmath} \begin{document} \begin{frame} \begin{align*} &\therefore& \theta_1 & > \theta_0 \\ &\Rightarrow& P+\frac{1}{\rho}\sigma_n^2 & > \rho\sigma_n^2 \\ ...


2

Just resize the equation: \documentclass[a4paper,twoside,twocolumn,final]{article} \usepackage{graphicx} \setlength\textwidth{42.5pc} \setlength\columnsep{1.5pc} \begin{document} \texttt{\\columnwidth is \the\columnwidth}. We are going to see a wonderful equation, it extends to the other column and knows no limits: \[ ...


7

You can center a single inline math formula by surrounding it with \hfill statements. (If you need the inline equation to be in display math mode, insert the instruction \displaystyle after the opening $.) \documentclass{article} \usepackage{amsmath, amsthm} \theoremstyle{plain} \newtheorem{theorem}{Theorem} \begin{document} \begin{theorem}[Binomial ...


0

What about inline math? \documentclass{article} \usepackage{amsmath, amsthm} \theoremstyle{plain} \newtheorem{theorem}{Theorem} \begin{document} \begin{theorem}[Binomial formula] \[ (a+b)^2 = a^2 + 2ab + b^2 \] \begin{proof} $ (a+b)^2 = a^2 + ab + ba + b^2 = a^2 + 2ab + b^2 \qedhere $ ...


5

May be you want to align them all at the = sign. \documentclass{article} %% preamble from egreg at http://tex.stackexchange.com/a/223438/11232 \usepackage{amsmath} \usepackage{siunitx} \usepackage{textgreek} \sisetup{text-micro=\textmu,math-micro=\text{\textmu}} \begin{document} \begin{align*} \SI{0.2}{\micro\second} &= (1 - FR) * ...


5

The minus sign goes away because you're using the wrong character U+2212 instead of a simple hyphen. Use siunitx facilities for inputting units. \documentclass{article} \usepackage{amsmath} \usepackage{siunitx} \usepackage{textgreek} \sisetup{text-micro=\textmu,math-micro=\text{\textmu}} \begin{document} \[ \SI{0.2}{\micro\second} = (1 - FR) * ...


6

Here's my solution; the box has the same height as \sum in text style. \documentclass{article} \usepackage{amsmath} \newcommand{\boxop}{\mathop{\mathpalette\doboxop\relax}} \newcommand{\doboxop}[2]{% \sbox0{$\ifx#1\displaystyle\textstyle\else#1\fi\sum$}% \dimen0=\ht0 \advance\dimen0 \dp0 \vcenter{\fboxsep=-\fboxrule ...


4

Another option (the example illustrates the size change according to the math style): \documentclass{article} \usepackage{amsmath} \newlength\boxln \newcommand\MyBox{{% \setlength\fboxsep{0pt}% \fbox{\phantom{\text{\raisebox{-0.25\boxln}{\rule{\boxln}{\boxln}}}}}}% } \newcommand\TwoBox[2]{% \mathchoice ...


4

EDITED to preserve math style: \documentclass{article} \usepackage{amssymb,stackengine,graphicx,scalerel} \stackMath \def\mybox{\scalebox{2.3}{\raisebox{\dimexpr-1.5\LMpt-0.5pt}{$\SavedStyle\square$}}} \newcommand\labelbox[2]{\ThisStyle{\,\,\raisebox{\dimexpr1.5\LMpt+1pt}{$\SavedStyle_#1$}% \stackunder[2pt]{\mybox}{\SavedStyle_#2}\,\,}} \begin{document} ...



Top 50 recent answers are included