Tag Info

New answers tagged

2

I assume you're using the subcaption package to set up the subfigure environments. If this assumption is correct, you may achieve your embedding your objective by (a) embedding two minipage environments inside a figure environment and (b) embedding three subcaption environments plus a \caption statement inside each of the two minipages. Note that it's ...


0

I don't see any problem. Could you be more specific? \documentclass{article} \usepackage{lipsum} \usepackage{caption} \usepackage{graphicx} \begin{document} Some text before Fig~\ref{fig:a} and \ref{fig:b} \begin{center} \leavevmode \includegraphics[width=0.7\textwidth]{example-image-a} \captionof{figure}{There is a caption here also in Fig ...


1

May be is not what you wanted (since you have accepted a answer with two subcaptions) but is what your asked ("the second must not be given a caption"): \documentclass{article} \usepackage{graphicx,lipsum} \begin{document} \lipsum[2] \begin{figure}[h] % Do not use only [h] in real documents. \begin{minipage}[t]{.45\linewidth} ...


3

You can use the subcaption package. Try something like this. \documentclass{article} \usepackage[english]{babel} \usepackage{graphicx} \usepackage{subcaption} \begin{document} \begin{figure} \centering \begin{subfigure}{0.49\textwidth} \centering \includegraphics[width = \textwidth]{tikzexample2.png} \caption{Left figure} \label{fig:left} \end{subfigure} ...


1

Do not use scale but relative lengths in your figure* (with the start if the float must fill both columns, but note that these floats are never placed in the page were is the code) or figure environment (for images in two columns). N.B.: Today is usually better use PNG, JPG or PDF images with pdflatex (or xelatex, or lualatex) than EPS files with latex ...


3

Something like this, the command \flushhere if placed between paragraphs tries to take a float off the deferred list and make it a here float at this point, if it succeeds it tries to pop the next deferred float and so on until it runs out. So if you use [hp] floats between paragraphs and put \flushhere after subsequent paragraphs, any floats that didn't ...


3

I know it makes a lot of time from this post but I had the same problem and found the solution you where looking for. I will post it just in case someone founds it useful. I took the idea from Gonzalo Medina's post (http://tex.stackexchange.com/a/58300/33066). Solution: Just add this line somewhere at the begining of you code: ...


2

You can include the image in the background, setting it in a tikzpicture that takes up no vertical space and where we can move objects as we please. The important thing is to draw the background picture before any other thing is printed. I assume that the three images have the same height. In the third \subfloat, I just place a couple of invisible rules to ...


0

Compiling your code does yield something quite similar to what you've posted here. But we can get it closer. I don't have Minion, so I'm simply using Computer Modern. What you'd probably like to do is define a new column type, to clear up your \begin{tabular} line, and so that you only have to change it in one place if you decide you'd like the columns to ...


2

I found a solution. Adding the option trim axis left to the tikzpicture chops off everything left of the axis. Combined with \centering before the subfigure this aligns the plots nicely. \begin{subfigure}[t]{\linewidth} \centering \begin{tikzpicture}[trim axis left] \begin{axis}[my plot] ...


0

@egreg's answer works, but is more of a work-around than a solution. What if you don't want to decrease the width of your subfigure, and still prevent captions from overlapping? The simple solution is to call the subfig package with margin options. Like this: \usepackage[margin=20pt]{subfig} This will add a nice padding around the sub-figure captions, ...


1

You can use a node around each subfigure and draw lines later \documentclass{article} \usepackage{graphicx} \usepackage{tikz} \usepackage{subcaption} \begin{document} \begin{figure} \begin{subfigure}[b]{.45\linewidth} \centering \tikz[overlay, remember picture] \node[anchor=south, inner sep=0] (model) ...


1

There are still a few problems with your solution, although some are probably doe to not being complete (e.g. the geometry settings). The negative \vspace is mostly needed due to the use of the center environment instead of \centering. Also, \begin{minipage}[t] aligns the top baseline, which is actually the bottom of the first image. One can use \raisebox ...


0

I managed to solve it myself using the caption package Here is the solution: \begin{minipage}[t]{0.3\textwidth} \vspace*{-0.55cm} \begin{center} \includegraphics[width=2in]{image1} \vspace*{-0.7cm} \captionof{figure}{Caption for fig 1} \label{fig1} \end{center} \vspace*{-0.7cm} \begin{center} \includegraphics[width=2in]{image2} ...


2

I'm gonna answer my own question, in case someone stumbles over this. I used the cutwin package, as suggesten in this thread. (Thanks Schumacher for the link). The output came out pretty nice. Below is the actual code I used in my report. \documentclass[12pt]{scrreprt} \usepackage{graphicx,pstricks,cutwin} \usepackage[onehalfspacing]{setspace} ...


2

Add also subsection to the reset list of chapter and then redefine \thefigure to look what's the deepest non zero counter. \documentclass[12pt,a4paper]{report} \usepackage[titles]{tocloft} % one usually wants the `titles` option \usepackage{graphicx} \usepackage{chngcntr} \setlength{\cftfignumwidth}{4em} \counterwithin*{subsection}{chapter} ...


3

Your numbering doesn't really make sense: 1.1.1 <-- by section 1.1.1.1 <-- by subsection 1.1.1.2 <-- by subsection 1.2 <-- by chapter* 1.2.2.1 <-- by subsection The reference by chapter should start again from 1. To achieve a "restart numbering from every sectional unit" approach, you can use the following setup: ...


1

If you have the possibility to obtain a vector graphics, it is the best solution, because it is scalable. An exemplary format is PostScript (*.ps and *.eps iles), but all depends on tools that you are using and a version of TeX (tex/pdftex engine) you want to use.


4

Using \begin{table} alone is equivalent to \begin{table}[tbp] Change all occurrences of \begin{table} in BilagC3.tex into \begin{table}[!htbp]


3

Since you're not using a \caption, you can insert a tabular without using a table environment. Use \section{Working experience} \begin{center} \begin{tabular}{..} ... \end{tabular} \end{center} If there is too much space between your use of \section and the tabular, then you can insert a negative \vspace{<len>}, or use the \centering ...


0

Next option would be to add \clearpage after the figure, it will put them in the right order I guess, but on the more pages (depends on the the size of the paragraphs).


2

H is a very special float placement specifier in the sense that it changes the traditional float into a non-float. Therefore, it would be completely strange to suggest a float specification that includes both suggested locations (like h, t, b, ...) together with a forced non-float H; that is, use something of the form \begin{table}[htH] ... \end{table} ...


6

pdfTeX File hparc.pdf has embeded the font LMRoman12-Regular as OpenType font as used in Adobe Illustrator: $ pdffonts hparc.pdf name type emb sub uni object ID ------------------------------------ ----------------- --- --- --- --------- PJUQXT+LMRoman12-Regular Type 1C yes yes no 5 ...


0

\documentclass{article} \usepackage{graphicx} \begin{document} \begin{center} X\dotfill X \resizebox{\textwidth}{!}{% \includegraphics[height=1cm]{example-image} \includegraphics[height=1cm]{example-image-4x3}} \end{center} \end{document} The initial 1cm height is arbitrary, then scale the combined pair to text width.


0

The solution is the following. I had to add a line replacing underscores. str = re.sub(r'"\b', r'\\glqq{}', str) str = re.sub(r'\b"', r'\\grqq{}', str) str = re.sub(r'[\.,!\?]"', r'\\grqq{}', str) str = re.sub(r'"', r'\\textquotedblleft', str) str = str.replace("_", "\_") # replaces the underscores, thank to Johannes for point it out!


1

Of course you can, if you manipulate the counters: \documentclass{article} \usepackage{afterpage,graphicx,lipsum,float} \newsavebox{\pagefigure} \begin{document} \lipsum[1] \afterpage{% \vspace*{\fill} \begin{figure}[H] \centering \includegraphics[width=.8\linewidth,height=.7\textheight]{example-image-a} \caption{Another figure} ...


3

LaTeX computes the caption width with a very simple algorithm: if the caption is less than the text width long, it is centered, otherwise it is set as a normal paragraph using the whole text width. When caption is loaded, you can specify a different “normal” width with width=, margin= or other package features. However, the behavior is exactly the same, ...


2

Since floating is discouraged anyway ... % DOCUMENT TYPE \documentclass[a4paper]{book} \usepackage[english]{babel} \usepackage[margin=10pt,font=footnotesize,labelfont=bf]{caption} \usepackage{lipsum} \usepackage{fancyhdr} \usepackage{graphicx} \usepackage{pgffor} \usepackage{afterpage} \usepackage{xifthen} \usepackage[top=1in, bottom=1in, left=1in, ...


2

\documentclass[journal]{IEEEtran} \usepackage{amsmath} \usepackage{lipsum} \usepackage{stfloats} \begin{document} \title{\huge equation position control in two column paper} \maketitle \enlargethispage{-2cm} \section{First} \label{first} \begin{picture}(0,0) \put(0,-600){\hspace{-\parindent}\parbox{\textwidth}{% \hrulefill \vspace*{4pt} \normalsize ...


1

First, I added a caption to the original example: \begin{figure}[h] \begin{tikzpicture} \draw[thick] (0,0) -- ++(4,0); \end{tikzpicture} \caption{Try \textbf{bold} here.} \end{figure} Looking at the generated HTML, the font styling changes from span to tspan immediately after the svg dance: <!--l. 5--><p class="noindent" ...


8

What Plass proved in his PhD thesis was that paginating documents using dynamic programming with very specific functions for optimisation are NP complete but also that for other functions this is not the case. Nevertheless Knuth felt that there isn't any method (i.e., a reasonable goal function to minimize) that would both work in practice with the computer ...


0

You should get no extra space when leaving a blank line around a float as shown in this example. \documentclass{article} \begin{document} \setlength\baselineskip{20pt} \setlength\parskip{30pt} \setlength\unitlength{50pt} aaaa1\begin{picture}(0,0) \put(0,0){\line(1,0){1}} \put(0,-1){\line(1,0){1}} \put(0,-2){\line(1,0){1}} \put(0,-3){\line(1,0){1}} ...


4

Like this? \documentclass[11pt,addpoints,answers,twocolumn]{exam} \usepackage{graphicx,lastpage} \usepackage{fullpage} \usepackage{amsmath,amssymb} % rumus \newcommand\mylog[1]{\mathop{{}^{#1}\mathrm{log}}} \hyphenpenalty 10000 \usepackage{geometry} \flushbottom \usepackage[normalem]{ulem} \renewcommand\ULthickness{2pt} %%---> For changing thickness of ...


1

Half part intuition, half part RTFM and I am answering myself. Definition that does the trick: \setupcaptions[table][location=top] \setupcaptions[figure][location=bottom] \setupcaptions[way=bysection,prefixsegments=section,headstyle=\bf]


3

You could work out exactly which constraint is forcing the float to the next page, but such problems are exactly why [!] was added to LaTeX, just tell it to ignore the constraints here and the float stays on the first page. \documentclass[ twoside, reprint, aps, pra, a4paper ]{revtex4-1} \usepackage{lipsum} \usepackage[draft]{pgf} ...


2

Without the original images and some output, I guess that just one or more images on the left are bigger that the width of the column because the option [scale=0.4], so that they are covered by the image of the right column. Try with [width=\linewidth]. In this MWE, the images A is wrongly scaled to the 70% and therefore is covered with the image "1x1". ...


2

I would appear that the figure is supposed to take up much, or even all, of a full page. If this impression is correct, you could use the p ("page") positioning specifier to direct LaTeX to place the float on a page by itself. For good measure, I would also specify the (maximum) height of the graphic to be 0.95\textheight or 0.9\textheight, rather than ...


2

A solution that requires a change in the file for the final version with only the list of figures. You keep the line \nofiles\renewcommand{\processdelayedfloats} commented out until you have the document in final form; the figures will be printed at the end. When your document is finished, uncomment the two lines and run LaTeX again. Here's an example ...


2

Be careful before applying this kind of “simplification”: it doesn't really simplify your life and makes the typescript harder to read and also to input, because you'll always be uncertain about the order of the arguments. Here I propose a key-value interface; you just need to set up your editor to prepare input such as \addpic{ width=, image=, ...


2

If you define a command with 4 arguments and they are all required, you have something like this: \newcommand\mycommand[4]{% these comment signs will prevent the introduction of spurious spaces ... #1... #4% } Then to use that command in your document you need to say \mycommand{}{}{}{} Also, use \graphicspath{{path/to/graphics/}} rather than adding ...


2

This is the best I can think of for such a hige table. First reduce the \tabcolsep to, say 3pt. Then use a landscape page and reduce the font size to \footnotesize (change as suitable). To add some gap between rows use cellspace package and use Sc instead of c column. But it is still big (Sigh) ...


6

By "best dimensions" I assume that you are looking for images that should be scaled down/up to fit in the width of the column of text, a minipage or so on ... One could use the option scale but this imply that you must know in advance the original size without scaling (e.g. 2 x 4 cm) and the desired final size (e.g. 3 x 6 cm) so you can set some like ...


0

I'd simplify matters and use tocloft if you're not already using memoir or another heavyweight class: \documentclass{report} \usepackage{tocloft} \renewcommand{\cftfigpresnum}{Figure } \renewcommand{\cftfignumwidth}{0.7in} \renewcommand{\cftfigaftersnum}{:} \begin{document} \listoffigures \chapter{One} \begin{figure} \caption{\label{fig:one} Caption} ...


2

Use \ffigbox[\FBwidth] so that the caption hets the same width as the picture. BTW, you can't use \\ inside \caption \documentclass{article} \usepackage{graphicx} \usepackage{floatrow} \begin{document} \begin{figure}[h] \begin{floatrow} \ffigbox[\FBwidth]{\includegraphics[scale = 0.2]{example-image}} ...


3

You didn't state which package you use to help create the subfigure environments: subfigure -- which is deprecated and ought not to be used anymore -- subfig, or subcaption. I'll assume you're using subcaption. One needs to remember that TeX converts single line breaks into space tokens. Thus, if each subfigure environment is terminated with a newline ...


1

Use the floatrow package for that: \documentclass[]{report} \usepackage[a4paper,showframe]{geometry} \usepackage{subcaption} \usepackage{lipsum} \usepackage[demo]{graphicx} \usepackage{floatrow} \begin{document} \vspace*{4ex} \begin{figure}[!htb] \begin{floatrow}[2]\ \ffigbox{\caption{discussion1} \label{fig:discussion1}}% ...


1

In essence you need to place each of the elements in a block. This can be achieved either via a tabular, or via a minipage (other options also exist). Below I've used a set of minipages: \documentclass{article} \usepackage{graphicx} \begin{document} \begin{figure} \begin{minipage}[b]{.45\textwidth} \centering ...


1

subcaption works well (in an automated way) when using newfloat for float creation. However, if you're using float or floatrow, you're going to have to do the legwork yourself. The following is taken from the subcaption documentation (section 5 The \DeclareCaptionSubType command): For using the sub-caption feature of the caption package some commands ...


3

Use package newfloat, a package designed to work well with caption and friends. \documentclass{article} \usepackage{newfloat} \usepackage{subcaption} \DeclareFloatingEnvironment[name={Supplementary Figure}]{suppfigure} \begin{document} \begin{suppfigure} \begin{subsuppfigure}{.45\textwidth} \centering\rule{.9\linewidth}{2cm} \caption{a small ...


2

To move everything to the right do not use adjustwidth just set \hoffset to the required length.



Top 50 recent answers are included