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1

As you discover ... Document > Settings... > Modules > Number Figures by Section > Delete This remove \numberwithin{figure}{section} in the LaTeX Preamble (as well as \usepackage{amsmath} if not needed by another command). Note that in LaTeX preamble you can use also the chngcntr package to control the numeration of floats. See Continuous v. ...


3

Here's one option using the \sidesubfloat command from the floatrow package; using subcapbesideposition (possible values= top, bottom, center) you can control the vertical position of the labels for the subfloats: The code: \documentclass[a4paper,10pt]{article} \usepackage{graphicx} \usepackage{floatrow} \usepackage{subfig} \begin{document} As we can ...


1

I infer from your write-up (though it's not made explicit) that your document uses a two-column format. Moreover, you're looking to generate a figure that spans both text columns. If that's the case, you should use a figure* environment instead of a figure environment; the former is set up to span both columns, and its caption will thus also be able to span ...


1

This works: \documentclass{tikzposter} \title{The Title} \author{The Author} \begin{document} \maketitle \block{A Title}{% \begin{center} \begin{minipage}{0.45\linewidth} \centering \begin{tikzfigure}[Caption of figure1] \includegraphics[height = 10cm]{example-image-a} \end{tikzfigure}% \end{minipage}\hfill \begin{minipage}{0.45\linewidth} ...


0

Add complete MWE the next time and add \centering within the figure environment CODE: \documentclass{article} \usepackage{tikz} \usepackage{mathtools} \begin{document} \begin{figure} \centering \begin{tikzpicture} \begin{scope}[thick,font=\scriptsize] % Axes: % Are simply drawn using line with the `->` option to make them ...


2

algorithm uses the float package which defines a H float specifier. Without loading algorithm, your \begin{table}[H] ... \end{table} actually produces an error stating "Unknown float option H". LaTeX does recover from this error though and then defaults to something different, which changes the display to a page-of-floats-like layout (which has the ...


4

Building on your code. Defining a the command \rot you have used, as \newcommand\rot[1]{\rotatebox{90}{\footnotesize#1}} from the graphicx package, although I don't know your original implementation of the \rot command. \documentclass{article} \usepackage{graphicx} \newcommand\rot[1]{\rotatebox{90}{\footnotesize#1}} \begin{document} \begin{figure} ...


4

I don't think that adding a range such as "Fig 4.2-4.9" in the LoF is a good idea since it might be ambiguous unless all eight figures appear on the same page (the one that will appear in the LoF). Trying to circumvent this using a page range in the LoF might be even worse, since it might be possible that no float appears in one of the pages of the range. ...


0

A quick workaround could be the following MWE: \documentclass[10pt,a4paper]{moderncv} \moderncvtheme[black]{classic} \usepackage[utf8]{inputenc} \usepackage[top=0.2in, bottom=0.2in, lmargin=0.3in, right=0.3in]{geometry} \setlength{\hintscolumnwidth}{2.5cm} \AtBeginDocument{\recomputelengths} ...


1

pdfTeX in PDF mode provide \pdfsavepos, which stores the current position that can be written to the .aux file and used the next TeX run. Also XeTeX and LuaTeX provide this features. There are some limitations: XeTeX's right to left mode is somewhat broken. Graphics state changes, that do not use the pdfTeX interfaces (\pdfsetmatrix, \pdfsave, \pdfrestore) ...


0

Here a solution with afterpage package. From the manual This package implements a command, \afterpage, that causes the commands specified in its argument to be expanded after the current page is output. \documentclass{report} \usepackage{lipsum} \usepackage{afterpage} \usepackage{graphicx} \begin{document} \chapter{chapter one} \lipsum[1-3] ...


0

If there's a single float on a floats-only page, LaTeX by default centers the float vertically, i.e., tries to create equal amounts of whitespace above and below the float. Your description -- that LaTeX is placing your float at the very bottom of the page -- makes it sound like the float is too tall for the page as well as, apparently, too wide. (If a float ...


2

This will turn off top floats for the duration. The default for article class is 2, but amsclass uses 4. Use \makeatletter\the\c@topnumber\par\makeatother to find out. \documentclass{article} \usepackage{mwe} \begin{document} \lipsum[1-3]% at least 0.7 of first page \begin{figure}[t]\includegraphics{example-image-a}\end{figure} ...


1

OverLeaf's TeX Live installation is the root of the problem. It seems that OverLeaf is using XeLaTeX by default and, since their installation of TeX Live is not current, this features a bug which causes the problem. Switching to LuaLaTeX resolves the issue: this can be done by setting the engine explicitly in the Project options. I've confirmed this on ...


0

Although you cannot, as far as I can tell, configure endfloat to recognise the command \addfig appropriately, you can configure it to recognise additional floating environments such as addfig. For example: \begin{filecontents}{endfloat.cfg} \DeclareDelayedFloatFlavor{addfig}{figure} \end{filecontents} \documentclass{article} \usepackage{graphicx} ...


0

Like this? \documentclass{article} \usepackage{tikz} \usepackage{lipsum} \newsavebox\pickie \begin{document} \savebox{\pickie}{\begin{tikzpicture} \draw[fill] (0,0) circle(15mm);\end{tikzpicture}} \lipsum \begin{figure}[h!] \usebox{\pickie} \caption{This is not much of a picture} \end{figure} \lipsum \end{document}


4

You have to set the caption indent to 0pt and the format to \centering as in the following in KOMA-Script: \setcapindent{0pt} \addtokomafont{caption}{\centering} Thus, the following should work: \RequirePackage[l2tabu,orthodox]{nag} ...


1

Package caption Package caption with option justification=centering helps usually: \documentclass{article} \usepackage[demo]{graphicx}% demo only because of missing images \usepackage{caption} \captionsetup{justification=centering} \begin{document} \begin{figure}[!tbph] \centering \begin{minipage}[b]{0.4\textwidth} ...


1

These solutions are too complicated IMHO, you don't need to install any new packages. \begin{figure}[h] \begin{tabular}{ll} \includegraphics[scale=1]{Figures/Race.png} & \includegraphics[scale=0.4]{Figures/Bearing.png} \end{tabular} \caption{Left: Diagram of angular contact bearing \cite{NBCBearing}. Right: Disassembled bearing} \label{Fig:Race} ...


2

If the figure is inserted with \includegraphics, use \makebox[\linewidth]{\includegraphics{myfigure}. It will overflow equally on both sides, but the caption will be limited to the line width. You also may use \includegraphics[width=\linewidth]{myfigure}, in order to reduce the size of the figure.


0

Hope it can help, Mainly, we are talking about completely different things here, the main difference being pages. When you talk about LaTeX, you are really thinking in printing your work in paper (or at least a PDF), but in CSS, it is a fluid bunch of objects floating in the web page Please take a look at this article


10

This is a bug in multicol similar to the one recently found about marginpars. At the end of a page LaTeX's normal output routine resets the variables \@mparbottom and \@textfloatsminheight. The multicol package neglected to do so, thus \@textfloatsminheight still contained the height from the here float from the first page --- as a result the available ...


1

Her is an improvement to make the result a little coloser to the post. In particular I changed the font to fourier+erewhon: \documentclass{article} \usepackage[utf8]{inputenc} \usepackage[T1]{fontenc} \usepackage{fourier, erewhon} \usepackage{graphicx} \usepackage{caption} \captionsetup{labelfont=bf, format=hang, labelsep=period} \begin{document} ...


2

Use caption package, with labelfont=bf key for label in bold series and format=hang for indent the caption text. \documentclass{article} \usepackage{mwe} \usepackage{caption} \captionsetup{labelfont=bf,format=hang,labelsep=period} \begin{document} \begin{figure}[h] \centering \includegraphics{example-image} \caption{If $μ=0$ and $σ=1$, the distribution is ...


0

All I can surmise is that the figure can't fit, contrary to your statements in the question. Like the commenters above say, get rid of \begin{center}...\end{center} because it adds additional (and unwanted) vertical space. Here's an example that shows that you should be able to squeeze such an image onto the page: \documentclass[a4paper]{article} ...


0

I was having the same problem, and I found a ridiculously easy fix. Are you starting a new paragraph before you insert your figure float? I mean, are you pressing ENTER and then inserting the float? I was doing that, until I tried just inserting the float at the end of the paragraph, without pressing ENTER, and voila! Worked like magic. Seems stupid, but ...


-2

\vspace*{-10mm} placed before \caption command does the trick. Just pick the number that works for you the best.


2

Instead of using a regular \caption use the \captionof facility of the caption package. Remove the caption from your figure environment, and then after your figure put: \vspace*{\fill} \captionof{figure}[Statistically significant chromosomal aberrations]{\textbf{Statistically significant chromosomal aberrations.} There are 44 amplified regions, 109 deleted ...


5

You can redefne \figureplace (for figures), \tableplace (for tables) or \floatplace (foll all floats) to change the text and formatting of the marker text (see Section 4 Modifying marker text of the package documentation). A little complete example: \documentclass{article} \usepackage{endfloat} \renewcommand\figureplace[1]{% \begin{center} (Insert ...


0

A manual solution, which also survives the list of figures: \documentclass{article} \begin{document} \listoffigures \begin{figure} \caption{For example, \texttt{\textbackslash include\{data/myNewChapterName.tex\}}} \end{figure} \end{document}


0

Like this? \documentclass{article} \usepackage{tikz} \usepackage{graphicx} \usepackage{tikzpagenodes} \usepackage[margin=1in]{geometry} \usepackage{lipsum} \begin{document} \begin{tikzpicture}[remember picture,overlay] \node[anchor=north east] at (current page text area.north east) {\includegraphics[height=0.75in]{epl-logo}}; \node[anchor=north west] at ...


2

How about this? I had to crop a UCL logo found on internet. Note you can change the university logo at the bottom ;o) \documentclass[a4paper, 11pt, oneside]{thesis} % The default font size and one-sided printing (no margin offsets) \usepackage[utf8]{inputenc} \usepackage[T1]{fontenc} \usepackage[showframe, nomarginpar, noheadfoot]{geometry} % ...


2

No wrapfigure: just a couple of minipages. \documentclass{article} \usepackage{graphicx,subcaption} \begin{document} \begin{figure}[htp] \centering \begin{minipage}[b]{0.38\textwidth} % almost 40% \includegraphics[width=\textwidth]{example-image} \caption{Rainbow gnome} \end{minipage}% \hspace{\stretch{2}}% \begin{minipage}[b]{0.58\textwidth} % almost ...


1

There are two issues, it would appear from the OP's comments: 1) insetting an image, and 2) eliminating/masking the transparancy of the inset. I will address the issues in turn: IMAGE INSET Here I give two examples using \stackinset. The first flush to the bottom right corner, and the second with some border. I use \includegraphics for the images, but ...


3

In your MWE are missing package subfig and begin{document} ... Also the use of \makebox is tu align figures in one column is not necesary. Try: \documentclass{IEEEtran} \usepackage[demo]{graphicx} \usepackage{subfig} \usepackage{lipsum} \begin{document} \lipsum[2] \begin{figure}[h] \centering ...


5

There is a hint on page 38 of the manual for the caption package: Please note that the listings package has its very own options for controlling the position and the skips of the caption: captionpos=, abovecaptionskip=, and belowcaptionskip=. (See listings documentation for details.) Trial and error shows that if you add \lstdefinestyle{interfaces}{ ...


2

Use the optional argument for \caption: \caption[Without cite for the LoF/LoT]{With the cite \cite{test} in the document} A complete example: \documentclass{article} \begin{document} \listoffigures \begin{figure} \centering A \caption[The basic components of gestural systems]{The basic components of gestural systems\cite[p. 13]{Saffer}} ...


3

Just put \centering in the first line of your figure to get them all horizontally centred and put your second subfigure into a savebox in order to have the correct height for your first image: % arara: pdflatex \documentclass{article} \usepackage{caption} % do not load that twice \usepackage{subcaption} % do not load that twice \usepackage{float} ...


2

In the case of the example code you've posted, all you need to do is to add the placement specifier [h!] to each begin{table} specifier. I would also omit the \makebox and minipage wrappers, as they seem to be doing nothing (except provide code clutter). More generally, if you don't want tabular material to "float" (in the LaTeX sense of the word), don't ...


5

You can use sidewaystable from rotating package. Just change table to sidewaystable and get rid of landscape environment. \documentclass{article} \usepackage{lipsum} \usepackage{rotating} \begin{document} \lipsum[1] \begin{sidewaystable}[ht] \centering \caption{Example} \begin{tabular}{l||ccccc|c|c} \hline & Text & Text & Text ...


1

Your question is very general, so it is impossible to give specific answer. I summarize advice given by Torbjorn, and add tow examples for figures: The code for above picture: \documentclass{article} \usepackage{tabularx}% for tables \usepackage{ragged2e}% for smart right adjusting text in table \usepackage{graphicx}% for figures ...


0

changed the jpeg to png images.. thanks @yo'


5

You had to replace \textwidth with \linewidth: \textwidth is the global textwidth (in portrait mode), while \linewidth is the current line width – which means \textheight when you're in a landscape environment. I took the opportunity to simplify your code, removing all this plethora of \multicolumns. \documentclass[a4paper,11pt,twoside]{report} ...


4

I'd suggest to use positioning library which can help you to place nodes beside/above/below others. \documentclass{article} \usepackage{tikz} \usetikzlibrary{positioning, fit} \begin{document} \begin{tikzpicture}[ mytext/.style={ draw, text width=#1, align=center, minimum height=1.5cm }, ar/.style={ ->, >=latex } ] ...


3

Welcome to TeX.SE, you can put as many figures in a single file as you wish but you'll need to draw each into a seperate picture, you can do this simply by creating a new picture object at the start of each figure and assigning it to currentpicture. For each figure, you'll need to explicitly call shipout with the desired output filename. If you compile the ...


2

As manual says (pages 716-171) When split vertically, the rectangle split will meet any minimum width requirements, but any minimum height will be ignored. Conversely when split horizontally, minimum height requirements will be met, but any minimum width will be ignored. In addition, inner sep is applied to every part that is used, so it cannot be ...


2

You get an out of float error because you used a \caption out side the float environment known as figure. A \caption can only be inserted between \begin{<float environment>} ... \end{<float environment>}. Put the \caption after the end of tikzpicture, directly after the \end{tikzpicture} line. Also, use \centering instead of \begin{center} ... ...


1

Your image is a displayed formula (that could by directly produced with LaTeX, I believe), so treat it as a displayed formula: \documentclass[12pt,a4paper]{article} \usepackage{graphicx} \begin{document} The sequent calculus proof of this uses contraction and is therefore not derivable in linear logic (unless special modalities are used): \[ ...


1

To illustrate, what we (Ulrike Fischer, LaRiFaRi. Egreg and me) said in comment: This I obtained width slightly modified your code (I don't use float package, for image I use example-image: \documentclass[12pt,a4paper]{article} \usepackage{graphicx,float} %\usepackage{float}% it is not necessary, % avoid placement [H] if it is ...


1

At tex.SE @Steven B. Segletes proposed to modify the \Textbox command, subtracting 7.7pt of each split height. \newcommand\Textbox[2]{% \parbox[c][\dimexpr#1-7.7pt][c]{2.3cm}{\centering#2}}



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