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2

There are a few issues with your setup. You need the T1 encoding You need the textcomp package The palatino package is obsolete The utf8x option is not recommended. \documentclass{memoir} \usepackage[T1]{fontenc} \usepackage[utf8]{inputenc} \usepackage{textcomp} \usepackage{mathpazo} \begin{document} ĵÊÄ¡£ÄãÇÕãl£¿¬FÚÔ 50.0441° N \end{document} ...


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The following seems to work: \documentclass{memoir} \usepackage[utf8x]{inputenc} \usepackage[T1]{fontenc} % <-- new \usepackage{palatino} \begin{document} ĵÊÄ¡£ÄãÇÕãl£¿¬FÚÔ 50.0441° N \end{document} Addendum: Instead of the using the nearly obsolete palatino package, you may want to consider loading the more recent newpxtext and newpxmath packages. ...


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A XeLaTeX alternative The OP explicitly names LaTeX in the title of the question. There is a related compiler called XeLaTeX which is intended to handle foreign characters in a smoother way than LaTeX. I thought it would be useful to mention it here. I've been using it for a while to typeset French with great success. The following piece of code in the ...


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As well as installing ly1 (in $TEXMFHOME), I had to run updmap with the --force option in order to generate ~/.texlive2012/texmf-var/fonts/map/pdftex/updmap/pdftex.map.


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For anybody who encounters this problem while using tlmgr instead of the distro package managers, you can solve this problem by installing the following packages: greek-fontenc babel-greek cbfonts


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Remove the aeguill package: it was an interesting hack several years ago, when Type1 versions of the European Modern fonts were not available. Now it should be regarded as obsolete. Without \usepackage[cyr]{aeguill} I get (ignoring the two errors that are unrelated)


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Indeed, use the fontenc package with the T1 option, and for more typographically correct results you can use the \og and \fg commands of the Frenchb extension (which provides the french option of babel). However, I think like egreg that the best way to enter French guillemets is to enter those guillemets directly, without having to enter \og or \fg nor ...


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Typing << for « and >> for » is provided only if you load the T1 encoding. \documentclass[12pt]{article} \usepackage[T1]{fontenc} \usepackage[utf8]{inputenc} \usepackage[french]{babel} \begin{document} \title{Test ULysse} \author{} \date{} \maketitle \section{26\ieme{} épisode Où Achille...} Il dit : << C'est Ulysse ! >> ... ...


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Some suggestions: By all means, load the fontenc package with the option T1. Consider loading the csquotes package with the option french=guillemets, in addition to loading the babel package with the option french. Then, write \enquote{C'est Ulysse!} and let LaTeX handle the exact positioning of the quote marks. Don't write \(26^e\) épisode in the ...



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