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5

This is less an answer than a response to requests in the comments. If the point is to make the Greek appear to be on the old side, there are many possibilities opened up by lualatex and xetex, which can use any unicode-encoded TrueType or OpenType font. Here are four specimens: \documentclass[12pt]{article} \usepackage{fontspec} \setmainfont{GFS ...


2

Choosing between ui and uv font shapes will change the appearance of ε. Also, this seems to work without LGR if you use the babel package with the polutonikogreek option. \documentclass{article} \usepackage[polutonikogreek,english]{babel} \usepackage[T1]{fontenc} \newcommand*{\uishape}{\fontshape{ui}\selectfont} \DeclareTextFontCommand{\textui}{\uishape} ...


5

To get the spiritus lenis, type \>: \documentclass{article} \usepackage[LGR,T1]{fontenc} \newcommand{\textgreek}[1]{\begingroup\fontencoding{LGR}\selectfont#1\endgroup} \begin{document} \textgreek{\>agewm`etrhtos mhde'is e\>is`itw} \end{document} I don't really understand what you mean by your other questions. As a friendly tip, try googling ...


3

Right, as @egreg and @cfr pointed out, there is no Tex Gyre Pagella in cyrillic; looking a bit further, I found: latex - Cyrillic in Palatino-like font - Stack Overflow Your choice may depend on what you mean by Palatino-like and whether and how much you're willing to pay for a commercial font. The open source Linux Libertine font is a serif font ...


11

In an ideal world, it's not supposed to happen. If the font is OML encoded then it should have \leftharpoonup and if it doesn't have \leftharpoonup then it should be in a different encoding. But the world isn't always ideal, arbitrarily pulling in the characters from somewhere else is a bit, well, arbitrary, and declaring a new encoding OML2 or whatever and ...



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