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The Latin Modern Math and TeX Gyre Math support projects are complete. Together, these fonts provide a total of 5 fonts for typesetting mathematics, all produced by the GUST e-foundry. Details can be found here. That page lists an additional six fonts, produced by other foundries, which support the mathematics opentype extension, including 3 available from ...


5

The usual definition of \sin is \mathop{\operator@font sin}\nolimits while \operator@font means \mathgroup\symoperators You won't find a definition place for \symoperators, because this is a byproduct of a \DeclareSymbolFont{operators}... instruction. So what you need is a new symbol font rather than a math alphabet. \documentclass{article} ...


4

Supposing you are only using the amsthm package in your document, this is how it can be done. If you want this behavior only for the "plain" theorem style, add the following lines in your preamble to re-define the plain style: \makeatletter \renewcommand{\th@plain}{% \renewcommand\@upn{\textit}% \itshape% } \makeatother and you're done. MWE ...


4

Use \Call{<function name>}{<arguments>}. \Call is designed for \Procedure calls, but \Functions share the same syntax. I'm sure @egreg will let me know if this usage is unwise. :-) \documentclass{article} \usepackage{algorithm,algpseudocode} \usepackage{amsmath} \usepackage{amsfonts} \usepackage{amssymb} ...


3

If you're using no package specialized in theorems, you can do \documentclass{article} \usepackage{etoolbox} \makeatletter \patchcmd{\@opargbegintheorem}{#2}{\textit{#2}}{}{} \patchcmd{\@begintheorem}{#2}{\textit{#2}}{}{} \makeatother \newtheorem{thm}{Theorem} \begin{document} \begin{thm} Something \end{thm} \end{document}


3

Here is a way with ntheorem package. I redefine the plain style: \documentclass{article} \usepackage[utf8]{inputenc} \usepackage[T1]{fontenc} \usepackage{lmodern} \usepackage{amsmath} \usepackage{amsfonts} \usepackage[amsthm, thmmarks, thref]{ntheorem} \usepackage{cleveref} \makeatletter \renewtheoremstyle{plain}% {\item[\hskip\labelsep \theorem@headerfont ...


3

If all you need from the stix-mathscr font are the calligraphic letters, there's an easier way: tell pdflatex that the font should be slanted to the left. \pdfmapline{=stix-mathscr STIXMathScript-Regular " -.25 SlantFont " <stix-mathscr.pfb} \pdfmapline{=stix-mathscr-bold STIXMathScript-Bold " -.25 SlantFont " <stix-mathscr-bold.pfb} ...


2

If you do not like the caligraphics from mathptmx, you will have to remove this package or redefine its mathcal-font. This can be done like the following: % arara: pdflatex \documentclass{article} % as your problem can be reproduced by a standard class, you should always give your MWE with such. Make it easier for us. \usepackage{mathptmx} ...


1

If you also thought that MnSymbol fits best to Libertine here is a (quite well) working hack: \documentclass[11pt,a4paper]{article} \usepackage[utf8]{inputenc} \usepackage[ngerman]{babel} %\usepackage[lf]{MinionPro} \usepackage{libertine} \usepackage[libertine]{newtxmath} \usepackage{MnSymbol} \protected\def\mathbb#1{\text{\usefont{U}{msb}{m}{n}#1}} %gives ...



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