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1

The usual definition of \sin is \mathop{\operator@font sin}\nolimits while \operator@font means \mathgroup\symoperators You won't find a definition place for \symoperators, because this is a byproduct of a \DeclareSymbolFont{operators}... instruction. So what you need is a new symbol font rather than a math alphabet. \documentclass{article} ...


6

The Latin Modern Math and TeX Gyre Math support projects are complete. Together, these fonts provide a total of 5 fonts for typesetting mathematics, all produced by the GUST e-foundry. Details can be found here. That page lists an additional six fonts, produced by other foundries, which support the mathematics opentype extension, including 3 available from ...


4

Use \Call{<function name>}{<arguments>}. \Call is designed for \Procedure calls, but \Functions share the same syntax. I'm sure @egreg will let me know if this usage is unwise. :-) \documentclass{article} \usepackage{algorithm,algpseudocode} \usepackage{amsmath} \usepackage{amsfonts} \usepackage{amssymb} ...


2

If all you need from the stix-mathscr font are the calligraphic letters, there's an easier way: tell pdflatex that the font should be slanted to the left. \pdfmapline{=stix-mathscr STIXMathScript-Regular " -.25 SlantFont " <stix-mathscr.pfb} \pdfmapline{=stix-mathscr-bold STIXMathScript-Bold " -.25 SlantFont " <stix-mathscr-bold.pfb} ...


1

If you also thought that MnSymbol fits best to Libertine here is a (quite well) working hack: \documentclass[11pt,a4paper]{article} \usepackage[utf8]{inputenc} \usepackage[ngerman]{babel} %\usepackage[lf]{MinionPro} \usepackage{libertine} \usepackage[libertine]{newtxmath} \usepackage{MnSymbol} \protected\def\mathbb#1{\text{\usefont{U}{msb}{m}{n}#1}} %gives ...


2

If you do not like the caligraphics from mathptmx, you will have to remove this package or redefine its mathcal-font. This can be done like the following: % arara: pdflatex \documentclass{article} % as your problem can be reproduced by a standard class, you should always give your MWE with such. Make it easier for us. \usepackage{mathptmx} ...


3

If you're using no package specialized in theorems, you can do \documentclass{article} \usepackage{etoolbox} \makeatletter \patchcmd{\@opargbegintheorem}{#2}{\textit{#2}}{}{} \patchcmd{\@begintheorem}{#2}{\textit{#2}}{}{} \makeatother \newtheorem{thm}{Theorem} \begin{document} \begin{thm} Something \end{thm} \end{document}


4

Supposing you are only using the amsthm package in your document, this is how it can be done. If you want this behavior only for the "plain" theorem style, add the following lines in your preamble to re-define the plain style: \makeatletter \renewcommand{\th@plain}{% \renewcommand\@upn{\textit}% \itshape% } \makeatother and you're done. MWE ...


3

Here is a way with ntheorem package. I redefine the plain style: \documentclass{article} \usepackage[utf8]{inputenc} \usepackage[T1]{fontenc} \usepackage{lmodern} \usepackage{amsmath} \usepackage{amsfonts} \usepackage[amsthm, thmmarks, thref]{ntheorem} \usepackage{cleveref} \makeatletter \renewtheoremstyle{plain}% {\item[\hskip\labelsep \theorem@headerfont ...


1

I found a partial solution with adding \usepackage{newunicodechar} \newunicodechar⊥{{$\bot$}} This is somewhat unsatisfactory, because it requires an addition for each symbol desired.


1

I have done a search on my system (Kubuntu 14.04): sudo apt-cache search quattrocento fonts-quattrocento - classic, elegant, sober and strong Roman typeface texlive-fonts-extra - TeX Live: Additional fonts Please install the package "texlive-fonts-extra" and you should be able to use this font.


11

It's a bug in the Type1 version of the Biolinum font; the Type1 font used by the combination slanted/boldface is LinBiolinumTBO.pfb and this is what fontforge shows for the character “L” where the corner is quite evident. The same character in the OpenType font Important update Bob Tennent has submitted an updated version of the fonts on CTAN. After ...


10

You can use the new newtxsf package: \documentclass{article} \usepackage{fontspec} \usepackage{newtxsf} \setmainfont{Helvetica Neue}[Scale=0.9] \AtBeginDocument{% \DeclareMathSymbol{0}{\mathalpha}{operators}{`0}% \DeclareMathSymbol{1}{\mathalpha}{operators}{`1}% \DeclareMathSymbol{2}{\mathalpha}{operators}{`2}% ...


5

Just search for some font you like (e.g. here), install it on your system and run Xe- or LuaLaTeX like in my MWE: % arara: lualatex \documentclass{article} \usepackage{fontspec} \begin{document} \setmainfont{41958.ttf} Я делаю некоторые тесты, чтобы увидеть хороший почерк. \setmainfont{42714.ttf} Я делаю некоторые тесты, чтобы увидеть ...


5

The smallest font should be mathb5 not mathb (error in the original but not triggered in the original document) \documentclass[11pt,a4paper]{amsart} \pagestyle{plain} \DeclareFontFamily{U}{mathb}{\hyphenchar\font45} \DeclareFontShape{U}{mathb}{m}{n}{ <-6> mathb5 <6-7> mathb6 <7-8> mathb7 <8-9> mathb8 <9-10> mathb9 ...


5

I would agree with egreg that it is far better to make the markup match the meaning here and mark up each identifier separately. The math markup in TeX, as well as the default fonts, are designed on the idea that adjacent letters are separate variables, typically with implied multiplication or concatenation operators. However if you are not convinced and ...


5

The reason why the global reassigning the letters in math mode is not good idea was mentioned in another answer and comments. But if you really need this, then you can do: \everymath{\it}\everydisplay{\it} at beginning of the document. If you need to keep the numbers in roman style, then you can set: ...


8

It depends on several factors. If your math formulas are all built like that, then you might be justified in changing the mathcodes for the letters, although I recommend you not to do it. Prefer a semantic markup: multiletter identifiers denote either variables or functions; define two commands, say \var and \func and type your formula as \[ ...


7

Edit OK as David pointed out in the comment, simply looking at \f@encoding/\f@family/\f@series/sc is not enough as this command is defined during a substitution. So one probably has to record if a substitution takes place: \documentclass[11pt,a4paper]{scrartcl} \makeatletter \def\define@newfont{% \begingroup \let\typeout\@font@info ...


6

Making the . active is strongly NOT recommended, because it ruins your ability to specify decimal lengths, such as 1.5pt, or other decimal parameters. That disclaimer given, the scalerel package allows you to scale one object to the vertical extent of another object. In this case, I scaled the \blacksmiley to the vertical extent of \svdot, which was a ...


8

The document \documentclass{article} \begin{document} \expandafter\show\the\font \stop puts the following information on the terminal and log \OT1/cmr/m/n/10=select font cmr10. showing that article is using the font cmr10 known to latex as \fontencoding{OT1}\fontfamily{cmr}\fontseries{m}\fontshape{n}\selectfont Just replace article by any class ...


12

Find on your system the file tex-text.map and copy it in the working directory under the name bardzo.map (or whatever you want). Then append to it a line so that it looks like ; TECkit mapping for TeX input conventions <-> Unicode characters LHSName "TeX-text" RHSName "UNICODE" pass(Unicode) ; ligatures from Knuth's original CMR fonts U+002D U+002D ...


48

first hit for google squiggle fonts suggested http://www.fontspace.com/category/squiggle from where I picked up MumbleGrumble (free for personal use licence) then using xelatex: \documentclass{article} \usepackage{fontspec} \setmainfont{MumbleGrumble I BB} \begin{document} One two three four this is almost as bad as my real handwriting. Red yellow ...


4

The package wasysym has nothing to do with \textrecipe. The command is defined in standard LaTeX by the textcomp package, which is not to be loaded with XeLaTeX and fontspec. The problem is that the Sanskrit 3000 font has no glyph for ℞ (U+211E PRESCRIPTION TAKE) so \textrecipe produces nothing (with XeLaTeX a small square is drawn). You can substitute the ...


1

I guess that your font does not provide this symbol (here is a collection of fonts, which do). Therefore, you will have to redefine this command in order to use an other font for this very symbol: % arara: xelatex \documentclass{article} \usepackage{fontspec} \setmainfont{Sanskrit2003.ttf} ...


5

Vollkorn Here is a great open-source font from Friedrich Althausen with eight styles and multilingual support. http://vollkorn-typeface.com/. The following font flavors are supported: PostScript OpenType .otf TrueType OpenType .ttf Web open Font Format .woff Embedded OpenType .eot Ligatures Glyphs Kerning Found in this tex.stackexchange ...


0

This worked with me having a similar error: Simply navigate to your miktex bin directory and execute the below commands: e.g. c:\Program Files\MiKTeX 2.9\miktex\bin\ initexmf --mkmaps intiexmf --update-fndb as described in: https://dev-eth0.de/miktex-makepk-pk-font-umvs-could-not-be-created/


0

You can apply the method in this answer \input{glyphtounicode} \pdfgentounicode=1 \documentclass[12pt,a4paper]{article} \usepackage[T1]{fontenc} \usepackage[utf8]{inputenc} \usepackage[english]{babel} \begin{document} $(A\to B)\vdash B$ sample text \end{document} I show here what I get from copying in Adobe Reader: (A → B) ⊢ B sample text Other PDF ...


4

First, a remark: the error occurs even without sn edges style. I believe this is not a forest, but rather a pgf bug. I've tracked the problem down to \pgfintersectionofpaths of pgf's intersections library. The following code replicates the exact error without forest. \pgfintersectionofpaths{% \pgfpathmoveto{\pgfpoint{0.0pt}{-3.53297pt}} ...


1

The -sDEVICE=pswrite output driver in Ghostscript has been deprecated since 12/15/2010. In Ghostscript versions >= 9.09, use ps2write or eps2write.


2

\ifxetex detects whether you are compiling with XeTeX or not. If you are, it executes the if bit. If not, it executes the else bit. Moreover, you cannot use inputenc with XeTeX (so it is good, really, that that code is never read). You can use 'normal LaTeX fonts' for the rest of the document, though. Just use the three lines of code from ...


3

I'm not sure why this might be the case, but this error seems to be related to the font being used. I can replicate your error when I compile your MWE using the following configurations: no font specification (Computer/Latin Modern), compiled with pdfLaTeX or XeLaTeX \usepackage{palatino}, compiled with pdfLaTeX or XeLaTeX \usepackage{libertine}, compiled ...


5

As for your primary question: use the Ligatures=TeX when selecting the font; for example, \setmainfont[Ligatures=TeX]{Segoe UI}. You can use Unicode en dash (–; U+2013) directly instead, which I find better than using the old TeX ligatures. As for your secondary question: I can recommend wholeheartedly Gentium. It is free, libre, comprehensive and extremely ...


4

I don't understand the need for the \setbox, \vbox, and \hbox instructions. If all you want to do is to create an image file containing a certain math expression, in a font size of 12pt, you could achieve this objective by writing \documentclass[12pt,preview,border=1pt]{standalone} \begin{document} $ x^2 + \phi $ \end{document} More elaborate contents ...


1

use \setbox0=\hbox{% $x^2 + \phi$% } or: \documentclass[12pt,preview,border=1pt]{standalone} \begin{document} \[ x^2 + \phi \] \end{document}


0

from dcmst's answer -- user@host:~$ tlmgr install collection-fontsrecomended


2

Provided you can spare a maths alphabet: \documentclass{article} \usepackage{mathtools,amssymb,amsfonts} \DeclareMathAlphabet{\mathbx}{U}{BOONDOX-ds}{m}{n} \SetMathAlphabet{\mathbx}{bold}{U}{BOONDOX-ds}{b}{n} \DeclareMathAlphabet{\mathbbx} {U}{BOONDOX-ds}{b}{n} \begin{document} \verb|\mathbb| \[ \mathbb{N Z R} \] \verb|\mathbx| \[ \mathbx{N ...


5

Loading the sourcecodepro package makes Source Code Pro the default typewriter font of the document. However, by default, the listings package uses the document's default roman family. Therefore, after loading sourcecodepro, you still need to tell listings that you want to typeset your code in typewriter font: basicstyle = \ttfamily ...


0

You can specify the closing, your cursive name and your signature all within the \closing command (as suggested in a comment by @Harish): \closing{Sincerely yours,\\[2ex]% {\LARGE\calligra Jane Doe}\\[2ex]% Jane Doe\\Job Title\\Company Name\\phone num% } The [2ex] after the newline commands specify how much vertical space to add between the lines. ...


1

You can use the otftotfm software to convert .ttf fonts to the necessary TeX font files.


1

The very first sentence of the MnSymbol manual reads: MnSymbol is a font of mathematical symbols designed as companion to Adobe MinionPro, but it might also fit well to other renaissance or baroque faces. In other words, MnSymbol doesn't change the default math font, it merely provides a set of matching mathematical symbols. If you want to use Minion ...


6

Why not increasing the size of the font in the arrays? Use for example \large before \begin{array} and adjust the spacing before it (I've used \vspace*{-3cm}). MWE: \documentclass[final]{beamer} % beamer 3.10: do NOT use option hyperref={pdfpagelabels=false} ! \mode<presentation> { \usetheme{default} } \usepackage[english]{babel} ...


0

So you want to have a bold font in math mode? You could try the package bm and use it like $\bm{\frac{1}{2}}$. Other solutions: How can I get bold math symbols? ... you can btw change all fonts to bold using \boldmath (after begin document). One thing is too make them bold. But you could also change the fontsize How to change the font size of a document?


0

To be even more specific, it is here, in the file called "mf.web". It is 23k lines of pascal mixed with heavy documentation that is something like DOXYGEN from the 70's. If you're running a debian-based distribution the source is also in the "texlive-bin" source package in the "/texk/web2c/mf.web" subdirectory.


6

Portable, and consistent solution Fandol fonts are reliable portable fonts for typesetting Simplified Chinese in TeX. Fandol fonts are not perfect: compared to the other commercial fonts, the character set of Fandol fonts is somewhat restricted, and the puncuations need to be tuned. Luckily, Fandol is a complete series of Chinese fonts in OpenType ...


5

There are the Latin Modern Fonts, from their README: The fonts are based on Donald E. Knuth's Computer Modern fonts in the PostScript Type 1 format In family lmtt, there are even three series: \documentclass{article} % \usepackage[T1]{fontenc} \usepackage{lmodern} \begin{document} \ttfamily \fontseries{l}\selectfont light \fontseries{m}\selectfont ...


3

Use Bera Mono: [...] \usepackage[T1]{fontenc} \usepackage{libertine}%% Only as example for the romans/sans fonts \usepackage[scaled=0.85]{beramono} [...] \begin{document} \texttt{\textbf{foo}}


3

Right, as @egreg and @cfr pointed out, there is no Tex Gyre Pagella in cyrillic; looking a bit further, I found: latex - Cyrillic in Palatino-like font - Stack Overflow Your choice may depend on what you mean by Palatino-like and whether and how much you're willing to pay for a commercial font. The open source Linux Libertine font is a serif font ...


2

This approach uses the scalerel package to scale the \varPI to the same vertical extent as an x in the local math style. Thus it automatically works for sub- and superscripts, as well as in all cases of \scriptstyle and \scriptscriptstyle. \documentclass{article} \usepackage{amsmath, scalerel} \newcommand{\smallPi}{\scalerel*{\varPi}{x}} \begin{document} ...


3

This might be what you're looking for: \documentclass{article} \usepackage{amsmath} \makeatletter \newcommand{\smallPi}{\mathpalette\small@Pi\relax} \newcommand{\small@Pi}[2]{% \mbox{\fontsize{\sf@size}{\z@}\selectfont$\m@th#1\varPi$}% } \makeatother \begin{document} \[ % first like it is in inline formulas {\textstyle\smallPi x_{x\smallPi}}\qquad % ...



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