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2

You have to ensure that the font family used has boldface small caps. The standard Computer Modern font family hasn't them, but the European Modern fonts do. \documentclass{article} \usepackage[T1]{fontenc} \newcommand{\mkboldcaps}[3]{% {% keep the font change local \scshape\MakeLowercase{#1}\textbf{\MakeLowercase{#2}}\MakeLowercase{#3}% }% } ...


1

I found this solution to be very easy: http://nerdytales.blogspot.com/2009/01/embedding-fonts-in-pdf-using.html The issue perhaps is the pdf figures which included fonts that are not embedded. You may reprint your pdf file using "Adobe PDF" while setting the "Properties"-> "Default Settings" to PDF/A-1 (mine had two, I chose PDF/A-1B:2005(RGB)). Then the ...


0

Here is the solution. Beware, you will need a recent version of ConTeXt. In the following example, I will use Baskervald, Corbel and Ubuntu Mono instead of Libertine, Liberation and Latin Modern Mono. Our mixed mathematical font will be based on Pagella Math. First of all, one should know the code of mathematical glyphs within an Opentype mathematical font. ...


4

I installed the whole font family in my system folder and then modified your example into % !TeX program = xelatex % !TeX encoding = utf8 \documentclass[a4paper]{letter} \usepackage{fontspec} \setmainfont{Roboto} \begin{document} \begin{letter}{Letter} \address{Address} \opening{Dear Mr} Some text here also \textbf{boldface} \closing{\mbox{}} ...


2

I had the same error in Ubuntu. A previously working document with greek letters gave the two errors below: ! Package fontenc Error: Encoding file `lgrenc.def' not found (fontenc) You might have misspelt the name of the encoding. l.99 \ProcessOptions* Necessary code for this encoding was not loaded. Thus calling the encoding later on will ...


2

If you have the ttf (TrueType) Cambria font, you can use XeLaTeX: \documentclass{beamer} \usepackage{fontspec} \usepackage{lipsum} \setmainfont[Ligatures=TeX]{Cambria} \usefonttheme{serif} \usefonttheme{professionalfonts} \begin{document} \begin{frame} \lipsum[4] \end{frame} \end{document} Notice that since the default font theme in beamer switches ...


1

Longer post This task was a big issue for me many years ago when I was typesetting and generating preview books of fonts where I needed to know all kind information about the glyphs before actual typesetting. I divided the answer into three small parts each with compilable TeX file. Part 1: xelatex and its tool There is a way in xelatex, it is ...


5

This example works with lua-, xe-, pdf- and with plain latex (followed by dvips and ps2pdf conversion). % run: *latex mal-japanese.tex % or % latex mal-japanese.tex % dvips mal-japanese.dvi % ps2pdf mal-japanese.ps \documentclass{article} \pagestyle{empty} \begin{document} % pdftex testfont % --> dmjhira % --> \table\bye \font\maljapanese=dmjhira at ...


3

% arara: lualatex \documentclass{article} \usepackage{luatexja-fontspec} \setmainjfont{MS Mincho} \newcommand{\HiraganaRo}{ろ} \begin{document} \[\HiraganaRo = 42\] In the formula I use the symbol \HiraganaRo{} which is taken from the japanese Hiragana alphabet. \end{document}


7

I'm not sure people reading your document will understand the symbol or know how to pronounce it. However, here's a way without loading the whole CJKutf8 \documentclass{article} \usepackage[utf8]{inputenc} \usepackage{amsmath} \usepackage{newunicodechar} \newunicodechar{ろ}{\text{\usefont{U}{min}{m}{n}\symbol{'215}}} \DeclareFontFamily{U}{min}{} ...


3

This is more a case of food for thought, rather than a definitive resolution to your problem. As cfr points out, a case of font scaling may be the lesser of evils in comparison to using a combination of two distinct font families. The point I wanted to raise, if you do opt for font scaling, is that I have found unequal scaling (different horizontal vs. ...


1

Of course, but as karlkoeller said, it depend of the font. See The LaTeX Font Catalogue. \documentclass{memoir} \usepackage{times} % change by times,bookman,palatino, etc. \renewcommand*\familydefault{\sfdefault} % if the base font is sans serif \usepackage{blindtext} % for dummy text \begin{document} \blinddocument \end{document}


3

The diagnostic message accompanying an Overfull \hbox message always prints on the terminal and log file a representation of the box being overfull. With [] TeX means omitted or unrepresentable parts. The fonts used are also shown: in your case the font used is \EU1/TimesNewRoman(1)/m/it/10 that is the internal representation of Times New Roman ...


5

You have to define a new symbol font, not overwrite one already existing: \DeclareSymbolFont{timespunct}{T1}{ptm}{m}{n} \SetSymbolFont{timespunct}{bold}{T1}{ptm}{bx}{n} \DeclareMathSymbol{;}{\mathpunct}{timespunct}{59} \DeclareMathSymbol{,}{\mathpunct}{timespunct}{44} Full example \documentclass{article} \usepackage{mathpazo} ...


3

This happens because axis y line=right overwrites the ylabel style. If you swap the options around (axis y line=right,ylabel style={font=\tiny}) you get the expected result.


6

sectsty is a quick way to achieve what you're after if you're using one of the standard document classes: \documentclass{article} \usepackage{sectsty}% http://ctan.org/pkg/sectsty \allsectionsfont{\normalfont\scshape} \begin{document} \tableofcontents \section{A section} \subsection{A subsection} \subsubsection{A subsubsection} \end{document} titlesec ...


2

I have fond memories of those font conversion times... I have downloaded and unzipped the ZIP file into my working directory and I ran (I'm sorry, I haven't polished the 8r.enc file from the TeX distribution in any way, so there are some warning messages about missing letters): afm2tfm GnuMICR.afm GnuMICR.tfm pdflatex mal-ec13B.tex The main TeX ...


3

The mathptmx package draws its calligraphic letters from the RSFS font, which explains the behavior you get, which has nothing to do with the svmono class. Minimal example: \documentclass{article} \usepackage{mathptmx} \begin{document} $\mathcal{ABCDEF}$ \end{document} If you want to reinstate the Computer Modern calligraphic letters, add ...


14

Quattrocento is possible, but different from sun: \documentclass{article} \usepackage[T1]{fontenc} \usepackage{quattrocento,xcolor} \begin{document} \Huge\sffamily \colorbox{red}{\color{white}\textbf{Java}} \textbf{Java} \end{document}


18

Not surprisingly, Sun Java logo uses Sun Semibold. As far as I can see it is not a free font. If you get it, you should get your result from XeLaTeX by doing: \documentclass{article} \usepackage{fontspec} \setmainfont{sun_semibold.ttf} \begin{document} Java \end{document} The most I can do for you is to give you this bitmap produced by www.fonts.com, I ...


2

Are you running Windows? You could try running fc-list to get a list of the fonts installed on your computer. They should be listed in the format <path>:<font names>:<styles> eg. C:/WINDOWS/fonts/corbelz.ttf: Corbel:style=Bold Italic In this case, you could use the font 'Corbel'. As far as I know, you'd have to make sure the font is ...


0

Use caption package and give font option as footnotesize. The font changing commands are often determined by the document class itself. For the standard classes (with size options in the first row), the values are as follows: Command 10pt 11pt 12pt \tiny 5 6 6 \scriptsize 7 8 8 \footnotesize ...


1

With default settings, the class IEEEtran already uses font size 8pt for captions: \listfiles \documentclass[conference]{IEEEtran} \begin{document} % \maketitle \begin{figure} \makeatletter \caption{Figure caption with fontsize \expandafter\@car\f@size\@nil} \end{figure} \end{document} \maketitle or putting the figure into an included ...


1

Another nice approach could be rotating and scaling the \partial symbol by this one-liner: \DeclareRobustCommand{\uppartial}{\text{\rotatebox[origin=t]{20}{\scalebox{0.95}[1]{$\partial$}}}\hspace{-1pt}} It uses the normal partial symbol, squeezes it a bit horizontally, rotates it around the top for 20 deg and minimizes the distance to the following ...


1

Just use the scaling feature of fontspec (inherited by unicode-math): \documentclass{article} \usepackage{unicode-math} \setmainfont[Ligatures=TeX]{Roboto} \setmathfont[Scale=MatchLowercase]{Asana Math} \begin{document} normal vs. $\mathsf{math}$ \end{document} On the other hand, mixing Asana Math for math and the Roboto font doesn't seem a good ...


6

If you find a Hebrew font, you can use it; in this example I use the fonts provided by the cjhebrew package. \documentclass{article} \usepackage{amsmath} % from cjhebrew.sty (with scaling added) \DeclareFontFamily{U}{cjheb}{} \DeclareFontShape{U}{cjheb}{m}{n}{% <-11> s*[1.2] cjhblsm <11-> s*[1.2] cjhbltx }{} ...


3

run it with xelatex. unicode-math allows to use single characters from another font: \documentclass{article} \usepackage{amssymb} \usepackage{unicode-math} \usepackage{libertine} \setmathfont[range={\beth,\gimel,\daleth,\aleph}]{Linux Libertine O} \begin{document} \Huge בגדא $ \aleph \beth \gimel \daleth $ \end{document}


4

You could scale it (1.5x horizontal, 1.1x vertical). EDITED to work in all math styles (thanks, tohecz), and provided a slight vertical shift and kern for better matching. Lastly, enclosed in a group, so that it works directly in a subscript. \documentclass{article} \usepackage{scalerel} \let\oldaleph\aleph \def\aleph{{\ThisStyle{\scalebox{1.5}[1.1]{% ...


14

There are other font that can be used: MnSymbol: FdSymbol: TX fonts: PX fonts: cjhebrew: OpenType fonts (LuaTeX/XeTeX): Latin Modern Math: Asana Math: XITS Math: TeX Gyre Pagella Math: TeX Gyre Termes Math: Linux Libertine: GNU FreeFont/FreeSerif: GNU FreeFont/FreeSans: MnSymbol \documentclass{article} % ...


4

Do you just want something like this? EDIT: The following code is edited to eliminate loading charter which turns out to be pointless. mathdesign wants to set \rmdefault to mdbch rather than bch - so let it. \documentclass{article} \usepackage[T1]{fontenc} \renewcommand{\sfdefault}{fvs} \renewcommand{\ttdefault}{fvm} \usepackage[charter, sfscaled, ...


4

It's not clear what you want Subscripts are set a bit higher if there's no superscript; just provide a dummy one: \[ A+B_{\alpha+\beta}^{} \rightarrow C+D_{\alpha+\beta}^{\prime} \] Note that you can type D_{\alpha+\beta}' as ^{\prime} can be shortened into '; also ^{\prime\prime} can be '' and so on.


4

MiKTeX doesn't run on Mac OS X, so probably your friend has installed MacTeX, which by default includes the CMSuper font package which provides Type1 renderings of the European Modern fonts that are used in documents that have \usepackage[T1]{fontenc} that's recommended when writing in French or another European language. The fact is that the basic ...


4

The solution, I think, is to update your TeX installation. However, as your other question shows, updating may not be without pitfalls of its own. I think it might be worth asking yourself just how much you need teubner. If it is only for the odd character (e.g. \koppa), I would think about whether there might be other ways to access those characters. The ...


3

This answer demonstrates some of the possibilities described in the LaTeX Font Catalogue. The sample text is from Lou's answer. The sample maths is from kerkis's documentation. Latin, Greek & Maths \documentclass{article} \usepackage[utf8]{inputenc} \usepackage[greek, english]{babel} \usepackage[T1]{fontenc} % uncomment as desired % ...


0

I was finally able to get my book printed by the company. Since multiple iterations of sending documents back and forth was out of the question, I changed two things at the same time, so it is unfortunately not possible to determine which of those changes was responsible. Using an evaluation version of Callas pdfToolbox, I ran the same font check that the ...


2

International language support may be helpful: see this page for Examples. \documentclass{article} \usepackage[utf8]{inputenc} \usepackage[english, greek]{babel} \usepackage[T1, T2A]{fontenc} \begin{document} \begin{abstract} Φιμ αδ σαπιενθεμ εξπετενδα περσιπιθυρ. Αδ συμμο περσιπιθ ελεστραμ φις. Ευ σαυσαε περσιπιθυρ σιθ, ηις αυγυε ασομμοδαρε ευ. Ιν ...


6

The font is respected if you use a better syntax: \documentclass{book} \usepackage{tipa} \newcommand{\upschwa}{\textsuperscript{\textschwa}} \begin{document} \textit{ahmiia zaoth etc\upschwa} ahmiia zaoth etc\upschwa \end{document} Note though that the TIPA fonts don't have italics, but only slanted. Loading tipa with noenc would give infinite ...


0

(converted from a comment) In the following link, replace "BATMAN" by your name: http://img.dafont.com/preview.php?text=BATMAN&ttf=halohandletter0&ext=1&size=45&psize=l&y=44, then save the image and include it in your document with \includegraphics or as described in http://tex.stackexchange.com/a/4882/1871. This font is free ...


2

You can use any system font with the xetex or luatex engines with the fontspec package as a nice interface. \documentclass{article} \usepackage{fontspec} \setmainfont{Ubuntu} \begin{document} The lazy fox jumpes over the brown dog. \end{document}


4

I think it is probably Ubuntu Mono: \documentclass{article} \usepackage{fontspec} \setmainfont{Ubuntu Mono} \usepackage{kantlipsum} \begin{document} \kant[1] \end{document} If you don't want to use it as the main font for the document, fontspec allows you to configure it for specific uses or as your 'typewriter' font. For example, you might want ...


5

The Leo Liu's comment is actually a solution. We can use a file name of the font to load the font with the fontspec package. The similar problem is when a font is not actually installed or cannot be installed due to the user's limited rights on the computer and we still wish to use the font. We use ExternalLocation option for this purpose, I enclose an ...


1

Obviously, my fonts were only approximate (most people will not have these fonts). Furthermore, they could not be rendered in all sizes, and so I often had to resort to \scaleboxes instead of font sizes to obtain the proper size. Clearly, this is a 1st cut just to demonstrate the possibility. \documentclass{article} ...


3

Harish Kumar's solution fails with babel 3.9j which is what TeX Live currently seems to have. MiKTeX is apparently using an older version (3.8m) which does not produce errors. [At least, this is my current working hypothesis - that the difference in versions of babel explains why my addition to the preamble is necessary with current TeX Live but not MiKTeX.] ...


2

This works. %% FIRST RENAME THIS FILE <yoursurname>.tex. %% BEFORE COMPLETING THIS TEMPLATE, SEE THE "READ ME" SECTION %% BELOW FOR INSTRUCTIONS. %% TO PROCESS THIS FILE YOU WILL NEED TO DOWNLOAD asl.cls from %% http://aslonline.org/abstractresources.html. \documentclass[bsl,meeting]{asl} \usepackage[greek,english]{babel} \AbstractsOn ...


5

Actually DeclareMathAlphabet works fine, the problem is that the latin alphabet has been given mathcodes pointing at the math alphabet range in Unicode plane 1 (1Dxxx block) but the fonts are expecting the ASCII range. unicode-math implements math alphabets by switching mathcodes (rather than changing the math fam) so the simplest thing to do is use ...


1

I can speak for Japanese only, but it might help you to find the right track for Chinese if there is a similar project. I had a privilege to exchange several emails with Ulrich Apel (the AAAA and Wadoku projects) and Timothy Eyre (the creator and maintainer of the Kanji Stroke Order Font). They are both nice and helpful guys. How the font with stroke ...


1

On Ubuntu installing texlive-latex-extra solved the problem for me.


1

\usepackage{times} it works for me. Update: It is better to use \usepackage{mathptmx} because times is obsolete according CTAN: The pack­age is now ob­so­lete, re­placed by the math­ptmx pack­age, which sup­ports Times Ro­man text and (mostly) match­ing math­e­mat­ics.


4

Following on the approach of the Free Tengwar project that Amy describes. I would add that, if you are working in Texstudio, and UTF-8, you can use Free Mono Tengwar as the font in your source editor window. Options -> Configure TeXstudio -> Editor ... and then set the "Font Family:" to FreeMonoTengwar This font lets you use both Roman letters and ...


2

I believe the problem may be that Inkscape currently imports text from PDF "as text", replacing fonts by fonts available to inkscape. If this is the origin of your problem, one approach can be to install Latex fonts for Inkscape. You can follow instructions on http://typethinker.blogspot.fr/2008/06/integrating-inkscape-graphics-in-latex.html.



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