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0

As noted by Seb, the fontspec package is often used for handling (OpenType) fonts in LuaLaTeX. However, loading the package is not mandatory (but there are benefits to using OpenType fonts). According to the libertine manual, there is a package option type1 (or nofontspec) for reverting to Type 1 fonts, as used by pdflatex. The option is relevant when ...


3

This is because LuaLaTeX handles fonts in a different way. The equivalents to your working PDFLaTeX options are \usepackage{fontspec} % Font handling \setmainfont[]{Linux Libertine O} % Main font is Linux Libertine \setmonofont[]{CMU Typewriter Text} % Monospace font is Computer Modern Typewriter For deeper understanding of what is going on with fonts in ...


1

If I understand well what you need, it's a way to have LaTeX-formatted text in CorelDraw graphics. Probably you should use the psfragger utility, as it seems to be dedicated to such a job. From the readme file that comes with it: PSFragger is a free tool used to replace some labels in eps files by using psfrag and LaTeX. The result is modified eps ...


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You need to use the fontspec-package: \documentclass{article} \usepackage{fontspec} \setmainfont{<your font name>} \begin{document} This text should be set in your new wonder-font \end{document} You need the font installed on your system, so no harm done there.


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Amazingly, this comes built into TeX! \documentclass{article} \renewcommand*\rmdefault{\ttdefault} \usepackage[T1]{fontenc} \usepackage[utf8]{inputenc} \usepackage[greek,english]{babel} \begin{document} Knuth really planned ahead, since he included a typewriter Greek font as part of the Computer Modern Typewriter series. And now you can use Unicode ...


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I know at least three of them, that can be used quite easily with fontspec and XeLaTeX or LuaLaTeX: Microsoft's Consolas and Courier New, and DejaVu Sans Mono. They all have monotoniko and polytoniko characters, that you may enter directly if you have a suitable keyboard. Here is a demo. Note that Courier New seems to have problems with polyglossia (‘No ...


3

If you use xetex or luatex, then Frederic Goudy’s Remington Typewriter font (to be precise, only the italic is Goudy’s), in the Pro version published by Lanston, seems to have what you need for both monotonic and polytonic Greek. You can preview the glyphs at www.myfonts.com/fonts/lanston/ltc-remington-typewriter/. The italic has only a little Greek, but ...


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If xelatex or lualatex is an option for you, you can try TeX Gyre Cursor, which is a free Courier clone with greek support or Courier New which looks even more like a typewriter face. I don't know how to get the later one, since it was already installed on my PC, so it probably comes with Win 7 or Office. Here is an example (I don't speek or write greek, so ...


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\documentclass{article} \usepackage[greek,english]{babel} \begin{document} Let's see some typewriter greek: \begin{otherlanguage}{greek} \texttt{Oper Edei Deixai.} \end{otherlanguage} \end{document}


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It is not immediately apparent which fonts support Cyrillic and Greek, but you can find a fairly wide assortment of excellent fonts with broad language support if you subscribe to Typekit. See e.g. the Typewriter Fonts list Typekit is a pay service, but you will be supporting typographers. :) Some of the fonts on Typekit may be licensed for free ...


2

Noto Sans Korean or original Source Han Sans should be OK. However, you should use a latest (unreleased) version of xdvipdfmx patched by Jiang Jiang not long ago. Realted: XeTeX: CID-keyed font support? % !TEX program = XeLaTeX % !TEX encoding = UTF-8 \documentclass{article} \usepackage{fontspec} \setmainfont{NotoSansKR-Regular.otf} % ...


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This font (arabtype.ttf) works fine: http://fonts.cooltext.com/Downloader.aspx?ID=11183 \LR{% Let $E_{1}, E_{2},\ldots, E_{n}$, some disjoint events (of null intersection), then \begin{equation} %eqn3.1 \label{eqn3.1} P \left(\bigcup_{1}^{n} E_{i}\right) = \sum_{i = 1}^{n} P (E_{i}) \end{equation} \noindent The equation \eqref{eqn3.1} generalizes to... ...


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egreg's answer is very good and probably better than what I'm about to suggest. \documentclass[a4paper]{article} \usepackage{libertine}% has sb \makeatletter \def\checkseries#1#2{% {\ifcsname\f@encoding/\f@family/#1/\f@shape\endcsname \fontseries{#1}% \else \fontseries{\bfdefault}% \fi \selectfont #2}% } \makeatother \begin{document} rm ...


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\documentclass{article} \usepackage{libertine} % Libertine has sb \makeatletter \DeclareRobustCommand{\sbseries}{% \@tempswafalse \sbox\z@{% % Disable warnings for missing fonts \let\@font@warning\@gobble % Save the current value of \@defaultsubs \let\@tempsubs\@defaultsubs % try sb \fontseries{sb}\selectfont % the value of ...


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As Mico had guessed, and you'd verified, you were loading non-standard calligraphic fonts in your document. By leaving the class options as default, or by adding the times option, you get two different results: \documentclass{elsarticle} %\documentclass[times]{elsarticle} \begin{document} $\mathcal{N}$ \end{document} by default: with times:


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Yiannis Haralambous' old German fonts come equipped with font definition files tailored for old TeX distributions, when only the METAFONT sources were available for building bitmap fonts. The warning is due to the fact that the font definition file doesn't define sizes less than 10pt. However, the fonts are now available in Type1 format, so they are freely ...


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It is just as it is designed; you may consier it a bug or a feature, but that one is the shape of the calligraphic A of the LX fonts I designed.


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You may use \newunicodechar in a more complicated way to check whether the next character is the same. We need a different active character (here ?) because \newunicodechar already uses ~ internally. \documentclass[twoside]{report} \usepackage{fontspec} \usepackage{polyglossia} \setdefaultlanguage{hindi} \setotherlanguage{english} ...


2

You can define a specific font command in fontspec just for punctuation. In this example I create an \englishfont family for Latin script (your commands for this were not quite right), then I create a command \punct just for punctuation that uses the \englishfont. It takes one argument, which could be any string you want in the other font, such as ...


7

To make every math in sans, just issue \sansmath at the beginning of the document. \documentclass{article} \usepackage{sansmath} \sansmath %% <<--- this \begin{document} \verb|\everymath{\sansmath}| gives $E=mc^2$ \verb|\sansmath{$E=mc^2$} | gives \sansmath{$E=mc^2$} \begin{equation} E=mc^2 \end{equation} \end{document} If you ...


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Install the package ly1. I just had the same problem and this package solved it for me. I'm sure a more knowledgeable user will be able to explain why.


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The embedded fonts in the (original) PDF Are Helvetica, Code2000 and Times: http://people.mpim-bonn.mpg.de/zagier/files/doi/10.2307/2975232/fulltext.pdf To me, it looks like you are looking for the Times. [Document URL corrected]


3

Use the sansmath package. The package is designed to offer sans-serif mathematics in the absence of proper sans maths fonts. The package’s name could be misconstrued: there was an ambition to do the job for “non-standard” sans fonts (as indicated by the value of \sfdefault), but the only good results have been with Computer Modern and cmss. To use ...


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You just need to add the option mono=false (or tt=false) to \usepackage[scaled, mono=false]{libertine} This is described at the libertine documentation: Use the mono=false (or tt=false) option to suppress activating LibertineMono.


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Here is a method for determining whether a particular shape (or weight) is available in a LaTeX font. This method applies only to fonts installed for use with LaTeX. It does not apply to system fonts used with XeTeX or LuaTeX. Identify the relevant font definition file. If you are loading a package, as in this case, look through the package for ...


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The font is NC Schoolbook: \documentclass{article} \usepackage{fouriernc} \begin{document} \textbf{Pasipoularides.} \textit{Am J Physiol} $n=7$ 2002.---Functional imaging \end{document}


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You don't need to add bold formatting via \schemerefformat – setting the labels bold is done by the underlying package that provides the numbering of compounds. Unless specified otherwise this is the chemcompounds package. \schemerefformat adds additional formatting for the labels in schemes. Per default its definition is ...


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This uses Iwona for Greek, change the font family in \DeclareSymbolFont if you want a different font. \documentclass{scrartcl} \usepackage[ngerman]{babel} \usepackage[utf8]{inputenc} \usepackage[T1]{fontenc} \usepackage{amsmath, amssymb} \usepackage[default]{sourcesanspro} \usepackage{sansmath} \sansmath ...


5

This is due to bad font design, in my opinion. Instead of letting S overshoot its bounding box, the font developers decided to define a bounding box that vertically covers the whole inked area and has some sidebearings, as it becomes apparent when setting the parameter \fboxsep to zero: \documentclass{article} \usepackage{fontspec} \begin{document} ...


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You have these options: Use \newenvironment{myfont}{\fontfamily{augie}\selectfont}{\par} Then it boils down to \begin{proof} \begin{myfont} Some text in the new font. \end{myfont} \end{proof} Or use the switch \ECFAugie \begin{proof} \ECFAugie Some text in the new font. \end{proof} Full code: \documentclass[english]{scrartcl} \usepackage{bm} ...


0

I was trying to use the technique from the previous comment, until I realised I was using a sans font and that the CM fonts dont have a 'sans serif' bold small caps... To solve it, I used the helvet package which has them. There is an additional trick as you have to re-load the declaration for \sfdefault as \usepackage{helvet} overwrites it! Then it ...


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I'm not sure I qualify as experienced and/or more successful :-). But here's an example of the setup I used for my thesis. Adobe Garamond Pro was used as the text font. Sadly, I needed bold to appease the thesis arbiters at my university, so I used BoldFont=AGaramondPro-Semibold as it looks slightly less out of place than the standard bold weight. For ...


4

use \documentclass{article} \usepackage[T1]{fontenc} \usepackage{lmodern} \usepackage{textcomp} \begin{document} \sffamily\Huge ab\textcopyright{}de\par ab\textcircled{c}de \par ab\textrm{\textcopyright}de\par \fontfamily{qhv}\selectfont%% Helvetica ab\textcopyright{}de\par ab\textcircled{c}de \par ab\textrm{\textcopyright}de \end{document}


1

KOMA-Script includes extensive formatting commands which allow you to easily customise layout and formatting provided you do not override the facilities by loading packages which overwrite the commands. For example, titling interferes with the customisation of the title. Below, I use the titlepage option to get a title page and KOMA's commands to customise ...


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As a start you can look around in The LaTeX Font Catalogue for similar fonts, and maybe use the pgfornament package for drawing ornaments. (Note that you'll have to manually download the pgfornament package from the indicated link and copy to your “project folder.”) Also I've made a small solution, so you may start along this way. ...


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The design of Palatino is not really compatible with Charter. There is a free version of a math font compatible with Charter, available with mathdesign. \documentclass{article} \usepackage[charter]{mathdesign} \usepackage{XCharter} \newcommand{\numberset}[1]{\mathbb{#1}} \newcommand{\C}{\numberset{C}} \begin{document} The polynomial ring $\C[x,y,z]$ has ...


1

see http://mirror.ctan.org/info/fontname/fontname.html But nowadays one can choose any filename. It is no more a big problem.


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The font used for the clause titles is defined in \Cfont, \SCfont and \SSCfont; the standard definition is found in iso11.clo and it's sufficient to redefine them by adding \sffamily. The period for \clause only can be obtained with a slick trick: \makeatletter \def\@seccntformat#1{% \csname the#1\endcsname\csname dot#1\endcsname\quad } ...


2

I no longer have the Mona Lisa font, but here’s an example of modifying the code for fonts other than those Peter Wilson used. The code is simpler with fontspec: % xetex or luatex \documentclass[12pt,twoside,openright]{memoir} \usepackage{fontspec,xcolor} \newfontface\bmb{Bembo Book MT Pro}[Numbers=OldStyle]% or use \setmainfont if the main matter will be ...


4

You have to load calligra that defines the font; the family name will be calligra, but you can select it by \calligra. The font is very slanted, so findent should be specified. \documentclass{article} \usepackage{lettrine} \usepackage{calligra} \usepackage{lipsum} % just for the example \renewcommand{\LettrineFontHook}{\calligra} \begin{document} ...


1

you have to define a main font with \setmainfont: \documentclass{article} \usepackage{fontspec} \usepackage{arabxetex} \newfontfamily\arabicfont[Script=Arabic, Scale=1.5]{Scheherazade} \setmainfont{Linux Libertine O} %\SetTranslitConvention{dmg} \begin{document} ...


0

(As requested.) One alternative might be Source Sans Pro by Adobe, which gave me the following fonts: SourceSansPro-BlackIt.otf SourceSansPro-It.otf SourceSansPro-Black.otf SourceSansPro-LightIt.otf SourceSansPro-BoldIt.otf SourceSansPro-Light.otf SourceSansPro-Bold.otf SourceSansPro-Regular.otf SourceSansPro-ExtraLightIt.otf ...


0

I am brewing a package, lazyeqn which is supposed to offer some useful macros for all the different symbols. It uses prefix macros, for example \BA means a bold A. And that is only one, among the cool stuff it offers, like operators, vector typesetting macros and macros for most used fractions. It is still work in progress, but I am putting here just in ...


0

Here's how to use a font with various weights you find online. I've used Source Code Pro as suggested by this comment under the question I linked to in the original post. Download the font You should get a zip file with a load of TTF and/or OTF files. If OTF exists, use these for everything that follows (here's why). I got my font from SourceForge here. ...


1

Essentielly you're missing a pwb.map file which describes the correspondence between the virtual fonts and the actual, type 1 fonts, so that pdflatex or dvips can use them. You install it in your_local_texmf\ fonts\map\adobe` (not abobe!). That done: Add to your local updmap.cfg this line: Map pwb.map Run texhash (TeXLive or MacTeX) or Refresh FNBD ...


1

Do you know of the fontspec package? According to the documentation it "allows users of either XeTeX or LuaTeX to load OpenType fonts in a LaTeX document. No font installation is necessary, and font features can be selected and used as desired throughout the document." I use it with documents typeset using pdflatex on Mac, simply putting ...


3

Assuming you want serif fonts, since sans are already covered by the other question, you might like: Baskervald ADF Venturis ADF Something else from the font catalogue Although these are LaTeX packages, many of these are available in opentype format so can be easily used with fontspec. Note that the font catalogue does not always show all of the fonts in ...


4

In according to unimath-symbols.pdf, the best fonts for math symbols are M Latin Modern Math (1588) X XITS Math (2437) C Cambria Math (2189) A Asana Math (2259) P TeX Gyre Pagella Math (1612) E Neo Euler (579) (IMHO, this is very wrong ...) There are many Times-compatible font with fontspec, like TeX Gyre Termes, FreeSerif ...


3

I had some experience with this in my thesis... The Times clone in the TeX Gyre fonts (Termes) can be used quite simply with the unicode-math package. In fact, any of the TeX Gyre fonts can be used this way (at least, the ones with corresponding math fonts) and this should work for XeLaTeX as well. \documentclass{article} \usepackage{unicode-math} ...


1

You can use \settocstylefeature[-1]{entryhook}{\LARGE\bfseries} (change \LARGE according to your needs). A complete example: \documentclass{book} \usepackage{tocstyle} \usetocstyle{standard} \settocstylefeature[-1]{entryhook}{\LARGE\bfseries} \begin{document} \tableofcontents \part{Test part} \chapter{Test chapter} \end{document}



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