New answers tagged

0

Ok, here we go... I figured you could figure how to plop the graphic element up top. %------------------------------------------------------------------------ ---------------- % PACKAGES AND OTHER DOCUMENT CONFIGURATIONS %------------------------------------------------------------------------ ---------------- \documentclass{scrartcl} ...


0

Protip: Don't have file names with empty space in them such as "Spider Man" Or "Dolly Parton" For whatever reason XeLatex compiler can't handle them.


1

I don't know why Latin Modern Roman is not recognized, perhaps it's not correctly installed as a system font. For getting the “traditional” calligraphic and blackboard fonts you can use the standard setup. \documentclass{article} \usepackage{amsmath} % should go before unicode-math %\usepackage{fontspec} % already loaded by unicode-math ...


-5

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0

sorry for bringing up this old question, but I think the answer to your problem is in this thread: Check C:\Program Files\MiKTeX 2.9\miktex\config\updmap.cfg (if you installed MiKTeX to the regular path) for the entry Map marvosym.map (it shouldn't be there, in your case). Add the missing entry Map marvosym.map to before mentioned updmap.cfg file and save ...


1

I love templates, i don't hate them. I really do. Templates are the best thing in the world. Always a reason for anger and amusement. \documentclass{scrreprt}% \usepackage{cleanthesis} \usepackage{fontspec} \setmainfont{TeX Gyre Heros} %\addtokomafont{chapter}{\fontspec{TeX Gyre Heros}} \renewcommand{\helv}{\fontspec{TeX Gyre ...


3

To get the Adobe symbol version rather than the Euler version of the glyphs, load the upgreek package with either the option Symbol or the option Symbolsmallscale; the latter option scales the glyphs down by about 10 percent. \documentclass{article} \usepackage[Symbol]{upgreek} \begin{document} $\upgamma$ \end{document}


0

The name of the fd-file is T1DejaVuSans-TLF.fd (see e.g. http://www.ctan.org/tex-archive/fonts/dejavu/tex). This means that the name of the family is DejaVuSans-TLF \documentclass{article} \usepackage[T1]{fontenc} \begin{document} \fontfamily{DejaVuSans-TLF} \selectfont Some text... \end{document}


2

The instruction \the\font produces nothing “visible”, but the control sequence that chooses the current font, in the internal NFSS format. You can produce the string representation of this control sequence by \expandafter\string\the\font. I changed the fonts to some I have. \documentclass[12pt]{article} \usepackage{fontspec} \usepackage{polyglossia} ...


2

Here is a solution (I used erewhon, a clone and extension of Adobe Utopia). \documentclass{book} \usepackage[utf8]{inputenc} \usepackage{geometry} \usepackage[explicit]{titlesec} \usepackage{array, graphicx} \usepackage[tracking=true]{microtype} \usepackage{fourier, erewhon} \usepackage{lipsum}% just to generate text for the example ...


2

An important question to ask is, what do the subscripts represent? If "sub" is of the form i or j and serves to index elements of the vector named a, it's customary not to typeset the indices in bold. Thus, you'd write \mathbf{a}_i and \mathbf{b}_j. If, on the other hand, "sub" forms an integral part of the name of the vector itself, it's more common to ...


3

documentclass[12pt]{…} and no font loading, no T1 font encoding. cmr is the default font. However, note if you need accented letters, you'd have better write \usepackage[T1]{fontenc}\usepackage{lmodern}.


1

Maybe something like this? \documentclass[a4paper,12pt]{article} \usepackage{arabtex} \usepackage{utf8} \XeTeXinterchartokenstate=1 \chardef\CharNormal=0 \chardef\CharBound=255 \newXeTeXintercharclass\CharNumbers \XeTeXcharclass`0=\CharNumbers \XeTeXcharclass`1=\CharNumbers \XeTeXcharclass`2=\CharNumbers \XeTeXcharclass`3=\CharNumbers ...


1

Just for completeness: It is also possible to use the simplified version of the Friggeri CV from my github account. I modified the template so that it works with a regular Texlive installation and pdflatex, without the need for luatex and biber.


4

As you seem to be using fontspec, the solution is much simpler. Create the appropriate structure in /usr/local/texlive/texmf-local/tex/latex/fontspec and copy there the following modification of the distributed fontspec.cfg file: %%% FONTSPEC.CFG %%% % % This configuration file sets up TeX Ligatures by default for all fonts loaded % with `\setmainfont` ...


0

It turns out that (specific to my situation) there is an absurdly simple work-around: I can use the Source (Serif, Sans, Mono) Pro fonts, because they have the correct license. So I install them. I get both OpenType and Type1 fonts, but since I work exclusively with LuaLaTeX (and so must the others), only the OpenType fonts are of interest. I copy these ...


1

Moving fonts, Windows 10, CS6 In Windows 10, using CS6, I could only find the fonts in Adobe Illustrator when putting the tex fonts into the folder below C:\Program Files\Adobe\Adobe Illustrator CS6 (64 Bit)\Support Files\Required\Fonts In Windows 10, it did not work to paste the tex files into C:\Program Files\Common Files\Adobe\FontsRecommended ...


4

In case it is useful to anybody, here are the files I used to install ITC Edwardian Script for use with pdfLaTeX. As a preliminary, place the truetype font into a clean working directory and name it EdwardianScript.ttf. Then generate an AFM file from the truetype. There are different ways to do this. ttf2afm is a relatively straightforward option. Then ...


5

If using the XeTeX or LuaTeX engine with the Plain TeX format is an option, there is a quite simple solution: %\input luaotfload.sty % uncomment this line if using luatex; not required for xetex \font\scriptheadingone="[ITCEDSCR.TTF]" at 24pt \font\scriptheadingtwo="[ITCEDSCR.TTF]" at 18pt {\scriptheadingone A wedding} {\scriptheadingtwo of at least one ...


2

If you don't already have them, then install Tex Gyre Pagella and TeX Gyre Pagella Math from the TeX Gyre project and then you can do this: \documentclass{article} \usepackage{unicode-math} \setmainfont{TeX Gyre Pagella} \setmathfont{TeX Gyre Pagella Math} \begin{document} Some Unicode maths: $x ∈ ℕ$ in a Palatino-like font. \end{document} Run with ...


7

cmss10 is not a Unicode font unfortunately - you need to use a font which implements Unicode maths - the TeX Gyre collection is probably a good starting point. Here is an example: \documentclass{article} \usepackage{unicode-math} \setmainfont{TeX Gyre Schola} \setmathfont{TeX Gyre Schola Math} \begin{document} Some Unicode maths: $x ∈ ℕ$ \end{document} ...


2

Not the cleanest way to do it, but \documentclass{article} \usepackage{color} \definecolor{lightgray}{RGB}{185,185,185} \definecolor{darkgray}{RGB}{115,115,115} \begin{document} \begin{flushright} \color{lightgray}{\Huge Bejamin} \color{darkgray}{\Huge Franklin} \end{flushright} \vspace{-0.5cm} \textcolor{lightgray}{\rule{\linewidth}{0.5mm}} \end{document} ...


0

The dimensions in tfm file are relative to the font design size. When I multiplied the dimensions (width, kern) with the design size, the kerning was correct. This was not really a kerning problem in of itself.


2

Use the pifont package. According to the Comprehensive LaTeX Symbol List, page 186, using astrosym symbols is possible. Add this to your preamble: \usepackage{pifont} \DeclareFontFamily{U}{astrosym}{} \DeclareFontShape{U}{astrosym}{m}{n}{<-> astrosym}{} Then, you can access the symbols using this command: \Pisymbol{astrosym}{number} number is a ...


0

Use \DeclareMathOperator{\dom}{dom}.


2

Just override the declarations with the original one: \documentclass{article} \usepackage{unicode-math} \DeclareMathAlphabet{\mathcal}{OMS}{cmsy}{m}{n} \begin{document} $\mathcal{DFIP}_{\mathcal{DFIP}_{\mathcal{DFIP}}}$ \end{document} This is the output of pdffonts, showing that cmsy is used. name type ...


1

As far as I can see from the screenshot, the fonts used are the standard LaTeX fonts, i.e., Computer Modern (Roman, Boldface, and Italic; together with the standard LaTeX math fonts). They look like 300dpi pixel fonts (300dpi was a de facto standard resolution of laser printers for a long time in the past).


0

You can just write the name of your ttf (instead of font family name) \usepackage{fontspec} \setmainfont[ %Path = C:/Users/font/, %address of your fonts Extension = .ttf, BoldFont = *-Bold, ItalicFont = *-Oblique, BoldItalicFont = *-BoldOblique, ]{DejaVuSans} %\newfontfamily{\myfont}[ %ame as in main font %]{myfont} If it still ...


3

As explained here on the ConTeXt wiki, some characters @, !, and ? are not normally considered letters for the purpose of commands. In order to use these characters in a command, it must be surrounded by \unprotect and \protect. It appears that \s!bf and similar commands are defined to be what can be returned by the macro \fontalternative, so they are ...


2

Very late answer, but you could also locally set the mathcodes of the letters to the ones plain TeX defines. Then you load the Computer Modern Calligraphic fonts and redefine \mathcal to locally switch to this family and use the “legacy” mathcodes. This solution is superior to the other answer, because you obtain proper scaling of the calligraphic letters ...


2

Before answering your main question, I’ll deal with the additional one: at least in TeX Live, there is a command-line utility program called texdef by means of which you can easily see how, and sometimes where, a command is defined, or, more generally, what is its meaning. The basic syntax is texdef -t <format> <cs> where <format> is ...


0

As well as installing ly1 (in $TEXMFHOME), I had to run updmap with the --force option in order to generate ~/.texlive2012/texmf-var/fonts/map/pdftex/updmap/pdftex.map.


5

Some options, but not all, I think, to use bold math in LaTeX: \boldmath is your friend if there's a longer portion of bold math fonts needed, not just a few symbols. Don't forget to use \unboldmath later on. \mathbf{...} is the math bold version of \textbf, i.e. the font is roman and upright letters usually. The package bm provides the \bm command, ...


0

Solved it using: % Font fourier \usepackage{fourier} % Only use the math font of mathpazo \let\temp\rmdefault \usepackage{mathpazo} \let\rmdefault\temp


1

If one did not prefer T1 encoding, and was using pdflatex, the other option is to use Bruno's \slantbox (Shear transform a "box"). \documentclass{article} \newsavebox\foobox \newcommand{\slantbox}[2][.2]{\mbox{% \sbox{\foobox}{#2}% \hskip\wd\foobox \pdfsave \pdfsetmatrix{1 0 #1 1}% \llap{\usebox{\foobox}}% ...


7

Use the T1 rather than OT1 font encoding: \documentclass{article} \usepackage[T1]{fontenc} \begin{document} \S 1 \textit{\S 1} \end{document} In this case, the symbol is taken from the same font as is used for regular text (whatever the current font is - upright, italic, whatever) rather than from a distinct symbol font. This is because T1, unlike OT1, ...


1

Change the beginning of the frame to: \begin{frame}[fragile] \fontencoding{T1}\selectfont \begin{lstlisting} If you have to do this for many frames, you can alternatively add these lines to your preamble: \usepackage{etoolbox} \AtBeginEnvironment{lstlisting}{\fontencoding{T1}\selectfont} Alternatively, you can compile with xelatex, loading the fontspec ...


4

You can use the upint option for stix: \documentclass{article} \usepackage[upint]{stix} \begin{document} With the \texttt{upint} option, the integral is not slanted \[ \int f(x)\,dx \] There are \verb|\intup| and \verb|\intsl|, but the package documentation recommends sticking to \verb|\int| \[ \intsl f(x)\,dx \] \end{document} If you just want the ...


2

Some values are accessible in TeX, e.g.: \documentclass[12pt]{article} \usepackage[T1]{fontenc} \usepackage{lmodern} \usepackage{color} \setlength{\fboxsep}{0pt} \setlength{\fboxrule}{.3pt} \setcounter{secnumdepth}{0} \begin{document} \subsection{Bounding box} \begin{quote} \color{red} \Huge \def\test#1{\fbox{\color{blue}#1}} \test{\`A} ...


1

Fonts in LaTeX are characterized by several attributes: encoding family series shape size baseline skip For each of the attributes there is a low level command \fontencoding \fontfamily \fontseries \fontshape \fontsize The last command has two arguments, because it sets both the size and the baseline skip. It would be quite inefficient if each of ...


0

For anybody who encounters this problem while using tlmgr instead of the distro package managers, you can solve this problem by installing the following packages: greek-fontenc babel-greek cbfonts


4

The outer $ are mostly irrelevant, because \texttt starts text mode, so you get exactly the same with \texttt{\lambda}: a standard math mode lambda in LuaLaTeX (provided math fonts have been initialized, which happens in your example exactly because math mode had started) and an error in legacy TeX engines and XeLaTeX. The \lambda macro is a \mathchardef ...


4

An Overview of the available options can be found at http://www.cpt.univ-mrs.fr/~masson/latex/Beamer-appearance-cheat-sheet.pdf \documentclass[aspectration=43]{beamer} \usepackage{geometry} \geometry{paperwidth=25.4cm, paperheight=19.05cm} \setbeamerfont{itemize/enumerate body}{family=\sffamily, size={\fontsize{18}{18}}} \setbeamerfont{itemize/enumerate ...


1

A \addfontfeature command will overwrite the standard font colours and other features within the specified stretch, e.g. {\addfontfeature{BoldItalicFeatures={Colour=red}}\bfseries\itshape these words are red} But this might not be too practical. A \newcommand might work: \newcommand{\mycolouredtext}[2]{{\addfontfeature{% ItalicFeatures={Colour=#1},% ...


19

The different is that \verb is an inline verbatim environment so that everything inside it is taken literally, even what would otherwise be considered a command. This also happens to use a monospace font because it is usually use to insert some codes (so that special characters don't pose any issue). On the other hand, \tt (and you really should be using ...


0

As Johannes_B was correctly pointing out, \textit can only take an argument (e.g. a few written lines) and cannot handle multiple paragraphs. The simplest solution for me was to use itshape as follows: {\itshape Write here everything that you want in italics. It can handle different paragraphs and equations (although the equations will not be in ...


3

You could load the relsize package and use the \mathlarger macro (once or repeatedly) to enlarge \mathscr{L}. In the third row of the following screenshot, the enlarged \mathscr{L} is generated by two calls to \mathlarger; don't overdo the enlarging stuff. \documentclass{article} \usepackage{mathrsfs,relsize,array} ...


3

You should also load newtxtext, for the text fonts. A small correction should be made as well, for \mathsf{\Omega}. Also load bm, which is better than the standard version for \boldsymbol provided by amsmath. You can also use \bm instead of \boldsymbol. \documentclass{article} \usepackage{amsmath} \usepackage{bm} \usepackage{newtxtext,newtxmath} ...


3

ÔÑã and ÔÇå are Unicode code points, viewed in mac roman encoding: ÔÑã: 0xEF, 0x84, 0x8B -> U+F10B ÔÇå: 0xEF, 0x82, 0x8C -> U+F08C The Unicode block is the private area. Font Awesome uses this area for its symbols: U+F10B: \faMobile or \faicon{mobile} U+F08C: \faLinkedinSquare or \faicon{linkedin-square} \documentclass{article} \usepackage{fontawesome} ...


6

You can access the internal and the external names of the current font respectively with \the\font and \fontname\font. The former must be stringified in order to print it. Further massaging of the external font name can be added. \documentclass{article} \usepackage{fontspec} \setmainfont{Libertinus Serif} \setsansfont{TeX Gyre ...



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