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4

Stripping down your document to the bare minimum required for this question (see minimal working example (MWE) for more detail), the following shows how to change the main font of your document with \setmainfont: \documentclass{article} \usepackage{lipsum} % add nonsense text \usepackage{fontspec} \setmainfont{Arial} \begin{document} \lipsum[1] ...


1

This works for me: \documentclass[a4paper,10pt]{article} % Default font size and paper size \usepackage{fontspec} % For loading fonts \setmainfont[SmallCapsFont=Fontin SmallCaps]{Fontin-Regular} \usepackage{url,parskip} % Formatting packages \usepackage{graphicx} \usepackage{caption} \usepackage{subcaption} \usepackage{textpos} ...


0

When you don't like the look of cm sans/lm sans, you can try the ecbright fonts. \documentclass{article} \usepackage[T1]{fontenc} \usepackage{cmbright} \usepackage{textcomp} \usepackage[utf8]{inputenc} \begin{document} Zwei Boxkämpfer jagten Quirin über den großen Sylter Deich. \$ \pounds \texteuro \end{document}


4

Latin Modern is a complete family of fonts, including serif, sans, typewriter and some other families. The following is actually a relatively small sample of what is available from Latin Modern: \documentclass{article} \usepackage{cfr-lm,microtype} \begin{document} \newcommand\dog{The quick brown fox jumped over the lazy dog.} \dog \textbf{\dog} ...


4

Something too close? The main difficulty is with the "not \mathcal{D}" character. But, we can go too close using the Zapf Chancery characters. For these, we declare the math font: \DeclareMathAlphabet{\mathpzc}{OT1}{pzc}{m}{it} The rest of the equation can be typeset with mathptmx. \documentclass{article} \usepackage{mathptmx} ...


3

TeX Gyre Termes. There is a difference for the∀` symbol : \documentclass{article} \usepackage{newtxmath, newtxtext} \begin{document} \begin{align*} \max_{\mathbf{x}} & \sum_{i\in \mathcal{D}}w_i \sum_{k = 1}^{K} R_{ik}^{(D)}(\mathbf{x}) \\ \text{s. t.}\quad & \sum_{i\in \mathcal{D}}x_{ik}P_{D_i}g_{ii}(k)\le Q_k, \quad\forall k, \\ ...


0

If you create some symbolic links you can avoid the need to update the configuration file when you install a new edition of TeX Live. As the user who manages your TeX installation (probably this means root or sudo): cd /usr/local/texlive ln -s 2015 current.2015 ln -s current.2015 current The configuration file 09-texlive-fonts.conf should be created in ...


4

Here is how I solved it. Basics: Ubuntu Linux. Manually installed TeX Live 2015 (from http://tug.org/texlive). TeX Live already come with the needed configuration file. It is found in <path to TL15>/texmf-var/fonts/conf/texlive-fontconfig.conf Copy this to /etc/fonts/conf.d/09-texlive-fonts.conf: sudo cp <path to ...


0

In general, you can use kpsewhich to locate the specific file TeX is going to load. For your specific question, kpsewhich FontAwesome.otf will tell you which copy of the font you need to modify.


0

I'm also trying to compile ggplot2-book, and the following code replacement solves this particular error for me: \setmonofont[Mapping=tex-ansi]{Inconsolatazi4} Now it's back to the other one thousand errors involved in compiling this package...


5

There are also blocks of different thicknesses in the Zapf Dingbats supported by pifont. Unlike bbding, these will be scalable even with a default TeX Live installation (which does not include the type1 versions of bbding for licensing reasons). \documentclass{article} \usepackage{amsthm,pifont} \begin{document} \ding{120} \ding{121} \ding{122} ...


7

Perhaps \RectangleBold or \Rectangle from the bbding package? Or make your own symbol using a \rule (no packages required): \documentclass{article} \usepackage{amsthm} \usepackage{bbding} \newcommand\MyRectangle{\rule{.36em}{2ex}} \renewcommand\qedsymbol{\RectangleBold} \begin{document} \begin{proof} A test text. \end{proof} ...


2

You can use picture mode for fixing it: \documentclass{article} \usepackage{eulervm,pict2e} \DeclareRobustCommand{\eulerosym}[1]{% \mathbin{\mathpalette\eulerosymaux{#1}}% } \makeatletter \newcommand{\eulerosymaux}[2]{% \vcenter{\hbox{% \sbox\z@{$\m@th#1#2$}% \dimen@=\ht\z@ \advance\dimen@ \dp\z@ \unitlength=.5\dimen@ ...


2

Define your colour shade of black first and then add that to the font specification using the Color (or Colour) key-value: \documentclass{article} \usepackage{fontspec,lipsum,xcolor} \begin{document} \fontspec[Scale=0.9]{Trebuchet MS} \lipsum[1] \definecolor{myblack}{rgb}{.7,.7,.7}% 30% black \addfontfeature{Color=myblack}% \lipsum[1] \end{document} ...


1

Do you like the \times - symbol from that font? (based upon: How do I put a circle around an operator? ) \documentclass{article} \usepackage{eulervm} \makeatletter \newcommand\incircbin {% \mathpalette\@incircbin } \newcommand\@incircbin[2] {% \mathbin% {% \ooalign{\hidewidth$#1#2$\hidewidth\crcr$#1\bigcirc$}% }% } ...


0

My current understanding is that it's ok to provide the tools for converting the Minion Pro font files as long as you have the license to do so. As an example, there's the Adobe Font Folio 11 software, which includes the Minion Pro fonts (see the full list of included fonts). In the license agreements for this software, this is stated in section 14.7: ...


0

Okay so here's my own answer, which I think is good enough for all those people like me who just want a rough guide as to what the numbers mean. \textfont2 = normal math font \scriptfont2 = script math font \scriptscriptfont2 = script-script math font \fontdimen13 = display-style superscript height \fontdimen14 = text-style non-fraction superscript ...


1

The Basic scheme is pretty minimal and lacks a lot of packages which you are likely to need, especially if you often compile 'templates' of one sort or another. Even if you don't, you are likely to want to use many of those packages. Unless disk space is a real problem, it is much easier to just install the full version of TeX Live and then you know that ...


0

If you are using TeXStudio in Windows, Go to Options-> Configure TeXstudio->Commands->Ps2Pdf. In that field, just paste "ps2pdf.exe -dPDFSETTINGS#/prepress -dEmbedAllFonts#true -dMaxSubsetPct#100 -dCompatibilityLevel#1.3 %.ps". This will directly embed all fonts while compiling itself. You can manually do this from windows command prompt. In windows command ...


1

Maybe an illustration would help... \documentclass{article} \newdimen\savedimen \begin{document} Control \[ x^{x^{x^{x^x}}} \frac{1}{x^{x^{x^x}}} \] \hrule \verb|\fontdimen13| $\sigma_{13}$ \savedimen=\fontdimen13\textfont2 \fontdimen13\textfont2=25pt \[ x^{x^{x^{x^x}}} \frac{1}{x^{x^{x^x}}} \] \fontdimen13\textfont2=\savedimen ...


1

You should: 1) Write Map ulg.map in your personal updmap.cfg, to be found in C:\Users\YourName\AppData\Roaming\MiKTeX\2.9\miktex\config. If it doesn't exist, create it. 2) Run updmap (as administrator if you have a multiuser installation, and you want all users to have access to the font). Then it should work. At least, the following worked on my system ...


8

Yes, using \font in LaTeX is deprecated. The reason is very simple: try the following sample file. \documentclass[12pt]{article} \font\ttfstandard="Ubuntu" at 12pt \font\ttfbold="Ubuntu Bold" at 12pt \begin{document} \section{A title with an {\ttfstandard Ubuntu} word} Some text and an {\ttfstandard Ubuntu} word. \end{document} As you clearly see, ...


2

(Too long for a comment, hence posted as an answer.) I experience no problem getting both the bib entry and the associated number to show up in blue if either the color or the xcolor package is loaded. \documentclass{article} \usepackage{xcolor} % or "color" \begin{document} \begin{thebibliography}{99} \bibitem{ref1} faljadls;fjasl;fj {\color{blue} ...


2

You could use the package polyglossia which allows you to define a main language and additional languages as well as special fonts for each language (you have to make sure the font you want does contain the desired characters at the code points you enter!). It also takes care of selecting the correct hyphenation algorithm for the chosen languages: ...


22

What causes the problems? The essential problem here is that updmap is executed in some way, shape or form. getnonfreefonts causes problems because it executes updmap. Other font installation scripts cause this problem because they execute updmap. (Of course, not all scripts do this. But our concern here is with those which do.) Finally, of course, ...


2

I have taken one of the examples in the ZIP file, changing just the name to one of a hero of Greek independence. I left the rest unchanged, for lack of knowledge of Greek. You can change font, provided you use one that supports Greek, I used GFS Artemisia. I also changed the nonsensical Zapf Chancery for “Curriculum Vitae”. ...


1

The problem here is most likely because the getnonfreefonts are already available in the shared texmf-local/ folder in /usr/local/texlive/texmf-local. However the corresponding Map files are not enabled and thiws LaTeX does not know where the fonts are. Thus these .map files have to be enabled. Ulrike Fischer mentioned that since these fonts are not related ...


1

%%%%%%%%%%%%%%%%%%%%%%%%%%%%%%%%%%%%%%%%% % Two Column One Page Curriculum Vitae % LaTeX Template % Version 1.1 (24/1/13) % % This template has been downloaded from: % http://www.LaTeXTemplates.com % % Original author: % Alessandro (The CV Inn) % % IMPORTANT: THIS TEMPLATE NEEDS TO BE COMPILED WITH XeLaTeX % % This template uses several fonts not included ...


1

Just to slightly correct Thomas Weise's answer - if you compile a straightforward LaTeX document without loading any extra packages, then the fonts used will be Computer Modern (not AMS fonts). The Computer Modern fonts are not TrueType fonts, and they're distributed through the "Knuth license". TrueType versions exist as part of Bakoma, but they have a ...


4

I might say "you get what you've asked for". All your axis labels are set with \textsc, which means that you get small caps for lower case letters. These are shaped like upper case letters, but have the height of lower case letters. As such, if you want normal lower case letters, use just Auflösung instead of \textsc{Auflösung}, and similar for the other ...


0

I think the font LaTeX uses depends on the documentclass and other settings, but by default, it should be using the Computer Modern family of fonts. These can be downloaded from http://www.ctan.org/tex-archive/fonts/amsfonts/. I think cmsy-name like fonts contain math symbols, cmbsy-name like fonts contain bold math symbols, cmex-name like fonts even more ...


3

Page 6 of fontspec's manual says this: Fonts selected by filename must include bold and italic variants explicitly. \setmainfont{texgyrepagella-regular.otf}[ BoldFont = texgyrepagella-bold.otf , ItalicFont = texgyrepagella-italic.otf , BoldItalicFont = texgyrepagella-bolditalic.otf ] In this case, for example: ...


0

Just choose which elements of a frame you want to be bold. \AtBeginDocument{\bfseries\selectfont} makes the normal text bold. More options can be found at http://tex.stackexchange.com/a/183053/36296 \documentclass{beamer} \usetheme{Warsaw} \AtBeginDocument{\bfseries\selectfont} % normal text \setbeamerfont{alerted text}{series=\bfseries} ...


3

You should use \~ within \textipa{} thus: \textipa{\~{@}} You should use the diacritic commands within "the IPA environment" (which is the generic term for the IPA groups and environment in the TIPA manual). All of your IPA stuff really belongs in the IPA environment. This will allow consistency of font and encoding, but it's also the only way a command ...


11

Just put the \~ inside the scope of the \textipa command: \textipa{\~@}


1

It's a virtual font (.vf) but should work just as a normal font: \font\zz=txmi1 abc [{\zz abc} ] \bye The font should be $ kpsewhich txmi1.vf /usr/local/texlive/2015/texmf-dist/fonts/vf/public/txfonts/txmi1.vf


4

Another way: using the latexmp package and its textext macro. Contrary to the classical btex…etex flags, it allows you to use loops inside your labels. input latexmp; setupLaTeXMP(packages="amssymb"); beginfig(1); label.urt(textext("$\mathfrak{b}$"),(100,0)); for i = 1 upto 5: label(textext("$\mathcal{X}_{" & decimal i & ...


4

Try verbatimtex %&latex \documentclass{article} \usepackage{amsmath} \usepackage{amssymb} \begin{document} etex; prologues:=3; beginfig(1); label.urt(btex $\mathfrak{b}$ etex,(100,0)); label(btex $\mathcal{X}_{\eta}$ etex,(-15,55)); endfig; end.


0

Another fine choice is the Raleway font, which is available in a recent TeXlive via \usepackage{raleway}. It is interoperable with pdftex, but also with the new Unicode engines xetex and luatex. \documentclass{article} \usepackage{raleway} \begin{document} \sffamily W. H. Gates III. | Ill Bill \end{document}


2

You can use the font provided by newtxsf (or another one providing sans serif math): \documentclass{article} \usepackage{lmodern,pdftexcmds,amsmath} \DeclareMathAlphabet{\mathsfbi}{OT1}{\sfdefault}{bx}{sl} \DeclareMathVersion{sfletters} \SetSymbolFont{letters}{sfletters}{OML}{ntxsfmi}{b}{it} \makeatletter \newcommand{\mathbfsbilow}[1]{% ...


6

The \copyright symbol, in the default OT1 encoding, is constructed (and actually uses the OMS encoding). The ‘c’ is shifted by a length tailored on the Computer Modern Roman font, but it's easy to fix this so the character is actually placed in a symmetric fashion inside the circle. \documentclass{article} \usepackage[scaled]{helvet} \makeatletter ...


10

Load the textcomp package to get the "real" copyright symbol (also for the cm-fonts): \documentclass{article} \usepackage{helvet} \usepackage{textcomp} \usepackage[T1]{fontenc} \begin{document} \textcircled{c}~\textcopyright~\textsf{\textcircled{c}~\textcopyright} \end{document}


1

You are probably using package hyperref. I think this is what is creating the bookmarks IEEE pdf express complains about. Thus, try removing the \usepackage{hyperref}, if any. Regarding the fonts: Here the culprit most likely are graphics, either in eps or pdf format. If you have a graphic with text which does not also contain the font, the font will be ...


1

The main issue here is the font you use. In Windows you should have Mangal font installed, but I have downloaded and installed Akshar Unicode and it worked just fine. \documentclass[12pt]{article} \usepackage{fontspec} \setmainfont{Akshar Unicode} \begin{document} मेरा नाम सौरभ है| \end{document} This is the output from xelatex:


4

You can obtain something that looks more or less like the image, if you use a font, among other things, that has historical ligatures. Here is a attempt, using the (commercial) font SabonNext LT Pro, fontspec and XeLaTeX: \documentclass[12pt,b5paper,twoside]{report} \usepackage{microtype} \usepackage{fontspec} \defaultfontfeatures{Numbers = ...


3

The book is Local Fields, by J. W. S. Cassels, Cambridge University Press, 1986 as testified by this preview in Google Books (the yellow bits are due to the search engine) This is a sample from page 3 At the time some publishers didn't want to afford big expenses for typesetting books with a small readers' base such as mathematics: the cost for ...


0

You simply need to redefine hintfont. As you are using fontspec, the following: \newfontfamily\bio[Ligatures=TeX]{Linux Biolinum}% this only works if you are using fontspec under Xe- or LuaLaTex \renewcommand*{\hintfont}{\bio\small\mdseries\itshape} would for example make the dates be printed using Linux Biolinum in small, regular weight and italic.


4

You shouldn't be using the german package that's obsolete and present only for compatibility with older documents. However, the problem is present also with babel. I'll add the code for working around the issue. \documentclass{article} \usepackage[ngerman]{babel} \usepackage{libertine} \usepackage{ifxetex} \ifxetex ...


5

Regarding the normal text font, you can change it by installing the normal text color using something like \setbeamercolor{normal text}{fg=blue} see example code below. Regarding the highlighted text, first recall that beamer already provides the \alert command which gives the functionality that you seem to be looking for. In any case, if you want to ...


6

The modern TeX engines (XeTeX and LuaTeX) together with the fontspec package are able to handle opentype and truetype fonts that are installed on the system. (Hence, you don't have "to get it into LaTeX" by yourself, as the engines will take care about it.) A minimal example looks like: \documentclass{article} \usepackage{fontspec} \setmainfont{Arial} ...



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