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1

I'm not sure you want to switch to Computer Modern particularly if the main document font is Times. The problem is, as has already been said, that \usefont... tells TeX to use the chosen font from that point on (respecting grouping). My suggestion is \DeclareRobustCommand\accuroam{% \textnormal{Accu\color{myred}\sffamily ROAM}% } With \textnormal you ...


0

I see no reason to switch back to the OT1 encoding since you are using T1 anyway: \documentclass{article} \usepackage[T1]{fontenc} \usepackage{mathptmx}% `times' is obsolete \usepackage[scaled=.90]{helvet} \usepackage{courier} \usepackage{color} \definecolor{myred}{RGB}{165,0,33} \DeclareRobustCommand\accuroam{% {% \fontencoding{T1}% ...


3

Herbet's answer is correct if you want to change the default font for the whole document. However, if it is just the labels produced by chemnum that you want to change then load fontspec and define a font for use and place its name in the format for the compound labels as follows: \usepackage{fontspec} ...


4

You have to load package fontspec and to define the main font: \documentclass[12pt]{report} \usepackage{achemso} \usepackage{chemnum} \usepackage{fontspec} \setmainfont{Calibri} \begin{document} Add any text here and use to refer to the compound. This way if you add a new figure in front of this one the numbering will automatically be changed. Not ...


0

I tried this on another installation that runs on a fresh centos 7, here it works. So this is a problem of an old xelatex version.


8

The font-changing commands are switch commands. That is, they apply to all following content until another switch is encountered or the group ends. Correct the issue by placing each special font inside a group with the text it's meant to style. I also added a trailing % to the line containing the red text to prevent spurious spaces in the output: ...


1

Use xelatex instead of pdflatex then you can easily define all font faces: \documentclass[a4paper,12pt]{article} \usepackage{fontspec} \setmainfont[% BoldFont =Open Sans Bold, ItalicFont =Open Sans Italic, BoldItalicFont=Open Sans Bold Italic]{Open Sans Regular} \newfontfamily\light[% BoldFont =Open Sans Semibold, ItalicFont ...


3

You can use it with the generic font switching commands (\usefont{T1}{fos}{l}{n}, &c.) but it's simpler to define shortcuts. I give them for the non standard weights (light, light-condensed, semibold and extrabold): \documentclass[a4paper,12pt]{article} \usepackage[utf8]{inputenc} \usepackage[T1]{fontenc} \usepackage[defaultsans]{opensans} ...


2

First, make sure you have selected "Use non-TeX fonts (via XeTeX/LuaTeX) in the Fonts settings panel. In your preamble, you specify the fonts you want to use for specific languages using XeTeX syntax: \newfontfamily\hebrewfont{FreeSans} \newfontfamily{\devanagarifont}{Sanskrit 2003} etc. Then, in the lyx document, highlight the text in the foreign ...


1

Well, sorry, but I think you're wanting to do this bigger than it is. You can use a font that you want to LaTeX. There is a good catalog of native fonts and you can always use ttf and otf fonts using XeLaTeX as you know. On the other hand, Computer Modern is a very good source, ideal for working with math, but not the only one. You say you're using Latin ...


2

In no way do I recommend doing this as I think it is aesthetically extremely dubious, at best. However, this site is not concerned with whether things are typographically judicious but only with the most technically elegant implementations of them in TeX. iwona sets the font up as the default roman family. cmbright sets up the font as the default sans ...


2

I finally found a solution using Metafont to create those dashed parenthesis. Here's my code (wich could certainly be improved) to use with 12pt fonts: u#:=23.5/36pt#; define_pixels(u); beginchar(40,7u#,16u#,5u#);"left dashed parenthesis"; x1=x9=6.5u; x2=x8;x3=x7; x4=x6; bot y1=-5u; top y9=h; z10=(17u,5.5u); (x2,y2)=(x1,y1) rotatedaround (z10,-8.5); ...


-4

This code is working !!!!!! \documentclass{memoir} \begin{document}% \font\myfont = "Wingdings" {\myfont \XeTeXglyph214} \end{document} I hope it will help people :) . http://distrib-coffee.ipsl.jussieu.fr/pub/mirrors/ctan/info/xetexref/xetex-reference.pdf


10

Fonts designed for TeX typically encode seven values which are available to TeX via the \fontdimen command: font_slant, font_normal_space, font_normal_stretch, font_normal_shrink, font_ex_height, font_quad, and font_extra_space. These are in order; you get at them with \fontdimen1, \fontdimen2, and so on. Extra space after punctuation is governed by ...


5

The macro you're looking to edit is \titlefont. From the class code: ... \renewcommand*{\titlefont}{\Huge\mdseries\upshape} ... \renewcommand*{\titlestyle}[1]{{\titlefont\textcolor{color2!85}{#1}}} ... So you can just give \renewcommand*{\titlefont}{\Huge\rmfamily\mdseries\upshape} in your preamble (supplying whichever switches you want) and you ...


0

No, zhmCJK does not restrict the font you use. sim*.ttf are only examples in the document. You can certainly use other fonts you have. % !TeX program = pdflatex % !TeX encoding = UTF-8 \documentclass{article} \usepackage{zhmCJK} \setCJKmainfont{ipaexm.ttf} \setCJKsansfont{ipaexg.ttf} \begin{document} 現在、\TeX{} システムの日本語化を進めているが、現時点で一応の動作が可能となった。 ...


0

U just need to press Enter key and it goes on, that won't effect your PDF file, and you don't bother to figure it out where's the error. The easiest way for fixing it once for all, is, you download an installer and re-install for a complete installation, then it will be alright.


4

You can use the CBfonts by Claudio Beccari, that are based on the Computer Modern design. \documentclass{article} \usepackage[LGR,T1]{fontenc} % or OT1, if you prefer \DeclareSymbolFont{upgreek}{LGR}{cmr}{m}{n} \DeclareMathSymbol{\deltaup}{\mathord}{upgreek}{`d} \DeclareMathSymbol{\piup}{\mathord}{upgreek}{`p} ...


2

Silencing the warning is not the answer: the output is incorrect because a sans serif font is used instead of a sans serif one. The problem is that the Latin Modern Sans fonts don't have a small caps variant. Here's the output you get which clearly shows the wrong font. Redefine \mkbibacro, instead: \documentclass{beamer} \usepackage{silence} ...


6

That's just the way it is. Here's a look at the font table for that encoding/series/shape (OT1/m/it): \documentclass{article} \usepackage{libertine,fonttable} \begin{document} \xfonttable{OT1}{LinuxLibertineT-TLF}{m}{it} \end{document}


1

This is based on dgoodmaniii's answer but uses XeLaTeX to select system fonts. I don't have Century Gothic so I've substituted fontconfig's choice. I've also used \newcommand* rather than \def since this is a LaTeX document. The example shows that the weight of the name remains constant. The fontspec facility to scale a font to the surrounding text size is ...


0

TeX is a macro language, so yes, this is absolutely possible, even easy. I don't happen to have those particular fonts available to me at the moment, but here's a rough-and-ready example using Computer Modern Sans and Computer Modern Serif, just to show how simple using two separate fonts is. I've selected those fonts in a generic way to show how you'd ...


4

The package iwona sets the math fonts in a way that's incompatible with fontaxes, which is required by libertine. The warning does not depend on the class, as it shows also with the article class as soon as one issues \boldmath which llncs.cls does when section titles are typeset. You get the same result, with no warning or error, by defining directly ...


2

It really seems that the unicode mapping is wrong in this place. The Maltese cross is indexed as U+2720. But the only font I could find to be mapping it right is the font Code2000. It brings the following symbol: The following MWE shows, how you can load just this symbol and proofs the scalability. It can be used in text and math: % arara: lualatex ...


6

It is not a clash! Package libertine defines all three font families roman (Libertine), sans serif (Biolinum), and mono (Libertine Mono). Do not load the Libertine mono font if you do not want that: \documentclass[12pt]{article} \usepackage[mono=false]{libertine} \usepackage{verbatim} \begin{document} \verb|looks good| \end{document} However, using ...


1

Adjust \verbatim@font to choose cmtt - the Computer Modern Typerwriter font that looks computer-y: \documentclass{article} \usepackage{libertine} \begin{document} looks good \verb|looks odd| looks good \makeatletter \renewcommand{\verbatim@font}{\fontfamily{cmtt}\selectfont} \makeatother looks good \verb|looks odd| looks good \end{document}


1

What about: \documentclass[25pt]{article} \usepackage{libertine, verbatim} \makeatletter \g@addto@macro\verbatim\sffamily{} \makeatother \begin{document} \verb|looks odd| \end{document}


2

A more general way of finding the family name which does not require you to open files and does not depend on the existence of a .sty file, is to use the names of the font definition files (.fd). This will work with any font which is set up for use with LaTeX, regardless of whether a .sty file is supplied or not. Suppose you would like to use Zapf Chancery. ...


3

The Alegreya (serif and Sans) fonts don't use the Berry scheme, where the family name is a three (or four) letter abbreviation. You find the family names in Alegreya.sty and AlegreyaSans.sty. Alegreya 220 \else % type1 221 222 \def\Alegreyafamily{Alegreya-\Alegreya@figurealign \Alegreya@figurestyle} 223 ...


1

This should work: \setbeamercolor{section in head/foot}{parent=palette tertiary,fg=red} \setbeamertemplate{section in head/foot shaded}{\color{blue}\usebeamertemplate{section in head/foot}} Explaination Look at the first line: It says that section in head/foot inherits colors from palette tertiary and redefine fg=red. Therefore palette tertiary remains ...


9

I don't know if you consider this a "math character" for your purpose, but you can draw a symbol with TikZ and scale it to the size of a symbol of your choice (the digit 0 in this case), so that it scales in math environments. Also, I eyeballed the dimensions, so the lengths and angles are probably all wrong. Feel free to improve them. ;) Also works in ...


2

The Type3 font is a so-called soft font which is a vector font, too. It is defined by PSTricks on-the-fly and embedded by default. You have to use the dvips option only for symbols from Times Roman, Zapf Dingbats, or Helvetica. You have nothing to change! However, most printshops do not know that a Type3 font can also be a vector font.


0

Metafont outputs raster fonts (bitmaps, in other words). It never deals with vector shapes. Yes, the curves are defined programmatically, but the moment Metafont encounters the instruction like "draw some curve/path" it discretizes the path. This actually allows some features of Metafont (like erasing, pens) to be implemented in a more or less ...


1

Since Metafont outputs bitmap fonts, you are not restricted to using only lines, arcs, and quadratic and cubic curves to describe the shapes of the glyphs. But the subsequent vectorization (which can give pretty messy results; also I assumed you were interested in generating vector fonts) clearly renders useless all the efforts one may have made polishing ...


1

First lets have a look on all the files. Here is, what I guess they are (but I am no expert here...). Please also have a look on Mrs. Beeton's comment below which discusses some of my misinterpretations and gives more information on certain extensions: afm: Adobe font metrics file enc: Encoding file map: mapping which tells TeX how .tfm fonts relate to ...


2

You don't need to reset everything to do this if all you want is to use your sans serif font as the titling font. You can just set your sans font with fontspec and then pass the [sf] option to titlesec. If you also want to change the title formatting you will need to load the titling package, which provides simple hooks for doing so. If you do want to set ...


2

If you want to know the current font at any given moment, you can use the following trick: \newcommand{\whatsthefont}{% \begingroup\edef\x{\endgroup \noexpand\texttt{\expandafter\string\the\font=\fontname\font}}\x } The \edef ensures that \expandafter\string\the\font and \fontname\font are expanded when the font hasn't yet been changed to the ...


5

It can be drawn with TikZ by combining a dashed line with a brace decoration like this: \documentclass{standalone} \usepackage{tikz} \usetikzlibrary{decorations.pathreplacing} \begin{document} \begin{tikzpicture} \draw [dashed, decorate, decoration={brace, amplitude=10pt}] (0,0) -- (0,2); \draw [dashed, decorate, decoration={brace, amplitude=10pt}] (2,2) -- ...


6

The size of print in the references section, when using amsart, is defined within the thebibliography environment, not by amsplain. It is, furthermore, defined in a user-modifiable manner, via the command \bibliofont, which (in amsart) does default to \footnotesize. Further investigation shows that \footnotesize is equated to \Small, which (in amsart) ...


2

The good news up front: If you use the amsart document class with class option 12pt, the material in the bibliography section will indeed be set at 10pt. Establishing this result takes a bit of sleuthing. If we delve into the file amsart.cls (which defines the amsart document class), one finds the following definition of the bibliography environment: ...


1

I used the etoolbox and appended to \thebibliography the command the \fontsize{10}{15}\selectfont command. \documentclass[12pt]{amsart} \usepackage[leqno]{amsmath} \usepackage{etoolbox}% \usepackage[margin=1in]{geometry} \usepackage{amsthm} \usepackage{amsfonts} \usepackage{amssymb} \apptocmd{\thebibliography}{\fontsize{10}{15}\selectfont}{}{}% ...


1

Normally, this works: I've defined another series of ‘symbolic’ footnotes, to be used with the \footnoteS command, while standard footnotes are obtained with the \footnote command. This requires only the bigfoot or manyfoot package, and it works with my version of MinionPro. \documentclass [a4paper,12pt]{book} \usepackage[utf8]{inputenc} ...


1

Depending on the particular version you have, the MyriadPro package may not provide the OT1 font encoding. To use the T1 encoding instead (which is recommended in any case), add \usepackage[T1]{fontenc} before loading MyriadPro. To make use of the additional text symbols in the TS1 supplementary encoding, add \usepackage{textcomp} as well.


0

I found out that since the default font of the figures in MATLAB is Helvetica, if I change the font to Arial after making the Latex file the final PDF file includes only type-1 fonts. it is possible to use the following lines of code to change the code while producing the figure: set(0,'defaultAxesFontName', '<fontname>') set(0,'defaultTextFontName', ...


1

The Latin Modern fonts are terribly hinted (or maybe not hinted at all)? This is LMRoman12-regular on Windows 7: That ain't right. I haven't been able to locate lm-super or BlueSky's version in a modern format for a comparison.


0

You can always tell Ghostscript specifically where to look for fonts, using the -sFONTPATH=... switch directly on the command line: gs -sFONTPATH=/usr/share/fonts;/some/other/path [...rest of command...] Alternatively, you can set the GS_FONTPATH environment variable. For multiple font directories, use a semicolon ; as a separator.


7

The warning message you report is irrelevant and innocuous. It would disappear if you had \RequirePackage{fix-cm} before the \documentclass line, but the Greek pi wouldn't appear either. The relevant message is at the end of the .log file: Missing character: There is no π in font [lmroman12-regular]:mapping=tex-text! The Latin Modern fonts support only a ...


4

Edit Here's egreg's (better) solution, for future reference, since this answer was accepted. \RequirePackage{fix-cm} \documentclass[fontsize=13pt,oneside]{scrbook} \usepackage{fontspec} \usepackage[Latin,Greek]{ucharclasses} \newfontfamily\substitutefont{CMU Serif} \setTransitionsForGreek{\begingroup\substitutefont}{\endgroup} \begin{document} \mainmatter ...


3

This is the XeLaTeX version using fontspec package: \documentclass{article} \usepackage[no-math]{fontspec} \setromanfont{Times} \begin{document} Whatever \end{document} In General, the current font depends on some parameters such as 'size', 'family', 'series', and 'shape'. For example, if one says \sffamily, LaTeX will try to change the current font ...


0

I would not use cjhebrew, it is old (2004) and you will not see your Hebrew in your source document. Given you are on a Mac, you have full unicode and opentype support. I suggest you use XeTeX/XeLaTeX and an appropriate unicode font. You can then typeset the Hebrew using any font that has the appropriate glyphs. There are a number available. Some of the free ...



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