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3

You can use tocloft and its \cftXfont family of commands: \documentclass[a4paper,12pt]{book} % Packages \usepackage[english]{babel} \usepackage{blindtext} \usepackage{titlesec} \usepackage[titles]{tocloft} \titlespacing*{\chapter}{0pt}{-50pt}{20pt} \titleformat{\chapter}[display]{\normalfont\scshape\huge\bfseries}{\chaptertitlename\ ...


2

The standard package pifont provides three Christian-style crosses and the Star of David. I could do with a crescent for Islam, as well, and some other things but am not sure where to find them right now: \documentclass{standalone} \usepackage{pifont} \begin{document} \ding{61} \ding{62} \ding{63} \ding{65} \end{document} wasysym offers an alternative ...


4

You should install all packages in the texlive family that bear the name recommended; in general I recommend a full install, so these problems are solved at the beginning. However, the package that contains the source for the European Modern fonts are installed by sudo apt-get install texlive-fonts-recommended This should get you in synch. However, this ...


3

use \documentclass[12pt]{article} \usepackage[T1]{fontenc} \usepackage{lmodern} \usepackage[utf8]{inputenc} \usepackage{amsfonts} ...


1

TeX Gyre Pagella does not support Greek. This is true of the opentype fonts as well as the type1 variants. It is true that the fonts include Greek glyphs but these do not constitute support for typesetting Greek text. Many fonts, especially those designed to support mathematics, include some Greek characters even though they are not designed to typeset Greek ...


1

Using \usepackage[bitstream-charter]{mathdesign} makes your entire document conform to the mdbch font family. To adjust the boldness of your ToC/LoT/LoF titles, you can add \renewcommand\cfttoctitlefont{\normalfont\Huge\mdseries} \let\cftlottitlefont\cfttoctitlefont \let\cftloftitlefont\cfttoctitlefont to your preamble. The first command adjusts the ...


3

If you have no objections to use xelatex, you can try the FakeBold option of fontspec. See the following example: % !TEX program=xelatex \documentclass{article} \usepackage{fontspec} \newfontfamily\darktt[AutoFakeBold=2.5]{Latin Modern Mono} \newfontfamily\blacktt[AutoFakeBold=5]{Latin Modern Mono} \def\test{abcde ABCDE} \begin{document} ...


5

Just to ease you to choose the better font conveniently. Apparently, I have made it several decades ago, here (click). \documentclass[preview,border=12pt,multi]{standalone} \usepackage{filecontents} \begin{filecontents*}{template.tex} \documentclass[preview,border=12pt,12pt]{standalone} \usepackage[T1]{fontenc} \usepackage{\fonttouse} ...


2

Use \usepackage[T1]{fontenc} \usepackage{kpfonts} \usepackage[utf8]{inputenc}


0

Ok, I managed to get somewhere, but not sure how correct it is. Basically, it's all about setting basewidth=, but to a correct value, which I've obtained by using \widthof from package calc. Now, the problem is that we must have an expandable macro for basewidth= - and also, I think when basewidth= is processed, the {lstlisting} environment still doesn't ...


0

With xelatex, the definition of fonts is done this way (at least I do it this way): \usepackage{xltxtra} \setmainfont{Palatino} \setsansfont{Tahoma} Concerning the titles, you're right by using the sectsty package. But there is a more efficient way to define the font to use for all title or just for chapter. \usepackage{sectsty} % Allows your to ...


1

Run with pdflatex or xelatex. It works with both. \documentclass{scrartcl} \usepackage{ifxetex} \ifxetex \usepackage{unicode-math} \newfontfamily\fTitle{Arial} \setmainfont{TeXGyreBonum-Regular} \setsansfont[Scale=0.95]{TeXGyreHeros-Regular} \setmathfont{TeXGyreBonumMath-Regular} \else \usepackage[T1]{fontenc} \usepackage[scale=0.95]{tgheros} ...


1

I suppose that you load the marvosym and awesome packe not before fontspec. This works without a problem with lualatex (up-to-date TL2014): \documentclass{article} \usepackage{fontawesome} \usepackage{marvosym} \usepackage{fontspec} \usepackage{libertine} \usepackage[english]{babel} \begin{document} \sffamily foo \Telefon\ from MArvoSym, \faInfoSign\ and ...


0

When facing such a problem some time ago (in my case, the main font was not recognized at all by the printer), I decided to convert all fonts to curves. Of course, this blows up file-size (can be more than ten times the original size), and the resulting pdf is no longer a good choice for on-screen reading, but printing on paper is absolutely safe. Although I ...


3

Monospaced fonts usually set up two features: no hyphenation, and no stretching or shrinking of the interword spaces. Courier, selected by \usepackage{courier} is no exception. The reason is that enabling hyphenation or flexible interword space would have undesired effects on listings, which are the main use for monospaced fonts. Moreover, long texts in ...


0

I would like to point out the following site: http://math.stanford.edu/~jyzhao/latexfonts.php Also, you can make your own true-type font in font forge. Using svg files with font forge and the above link, you should be able to easily create and use your own font. Make sure to follow the instructions on the above site precisely: actually make a copy of your ...


3

With utf8 the Unicode character € is mapped to \texteuro, which requires textcomp. The definition of \texteuro is \DeclareTextCommandDefault{\texteuro} {\CheckEncodingSubset\UseTextSymbol{TS1}\tc@fake@euro5\texteuro} If the TS1 font for the current family is known not to have the Euro symbol (that is, it belongs to class 5), the glyph is faked by means ...


7

LaTeX does not need to check anything, the T1 encoding doesn't include euro by definition. It is in the TS1 encoding (as used by textcomp) and of course in the EU1 and EU2 encodings used by lua and xe latex.


3

You can make your life easier if you could switch to xelatex or lualatex: \documentclass[a4paper]{article} \usepackage{fontspec} \usepackage{libertine} \usepackage[polutonikogreek,english]{babel} \begin{document} The starting verse of the Iliad is \begin{quotation} Μῆνιν ἄειδε, θεά, Πηληιάδεω Ἀχιλῆος \end{quotation} and it's really great. \end{document} ...


5

It's a good question, because the issue can happen to other users. For several years, the only practical way for inputting Greek was through a transliteration table (a for alpha, b for beta, 'a for alpha with tonos and so on). TeX Live 2012 included the lgrx package that allowed direct UTF-8 input of Greek, so that a UTF-8 document like ...


4

You can use these icons (that are part ot the font since version 4) with this code : \documentclass[a4paper, 12pt]{article} \usepackage[x11names]{xcolor} \usepackage{array} \usepackage{fontspec} \setmainfont{Minion Pro} \usepackage{fontawesome} \def\faSkype{\FA\symbol{"F17E}} \def\faLinux{\FA\symbol{"F17C}} \def\faTh{\FA\symbol{"F00A}} ...


3

As Paul Gessler suggested, you can use \text{} instead of \mathrm{} when you want upright rather than specifically roman text. Since you are using beamer, you don't even need to load any additional packages: \documentclass{beamer} \begin{document} $abc\text{abc}$ \end{document} If you are producing an article version as well, you obviously want TeX to ...


0

Uninstalled all previous installed texlive packages and installed texlive-full. Now everything works fine. Thanks.


1

\documentclass{beamer} \usefonttheme{professionalfonts} \begin{document} $abc\mathrm{abc}$ \end{document} Then beamer doesn't change the math fonts.


2

You get what you ask for: Roman text. For advice on this, see Equivalent of \mathup for upright text in math mode?


1

A redefinition of the internal \@makechapterhead: \documentclass[a4paper,12pt,twoside,openright]{report} \usepackage[T1]{fontenc} \usepackage{mathptmx}%% Instead of times which is obsolete \makeatletter \def\@makechapterhead#1{% \vspace*{50\p@}% {\parindent \z@ \raggedright \normalfont \ifnum \c@secnumdepth >\m@ne ...


1

Full Computer Modern Math collection is available here as .otf files for use in any non-LaTeX programs suporting OpenType fonts. Same web page have also Computer Modern available.


4

Summarizing and combining the comments that have been posted so far, the following setup may work for you. It assumes that you're using pdfLaTeX and that you have a reasonably current TeX distribution. (If you use XeLaTeX or LuaLaTeX, different instructions would apply for the font-loading portion of the preamble.) There's one crucial piece of information ...


1

I only see the condensed light (cl) series in the opensans sample pdf. You can set your title font to this using \setbeamerfont{frametitle}{series={\fontseries{cl}}}


4

Ok, so I found the answer to my own question. It turns out I was pretty close: \setmainfont[SizeFeatures = {{Size = -8, Font = <Font_A>}, {Size = 8-12, Font = <Font_B>}, {Size = 12- , Font = <Font_C>}}]{<Typeface>} produces exactly what I wanted.


2

An example for HelveticaNeue-Light \documentclass{article} \usepackage{fontspec} \setmainfont[ ItalicFont = HelveticaNeue-Italic, BoldFont = HelveticaNeue-Bold, BoldItalicFont = HelveticaNeue-BoldItalic]{HelveticaNeue} \newfontfamily\NHLight[ ItalicFont = HelveticaNeue-LightItalic, BoldFont = HelveticaNeue-UltraLight, ...


3

in a texlive 2014, updated this morning I get the following from grep (with my annotation in comment at the end of each line): $ grep "[^a-z]textlf[^a-z]" */* allrunes/allrunes.sty:\DeclareTextFontCommand{\textlf}{\lfseries} baskervaldx/Baskervaldx.sty:\DeclareRobustCommand{\textlf}[1]{% lining figures fbb/fbb.sty:\DeclareRobustCommand{\textlf}[1]{% ...


1

An alternative to Paul Gessler's methods. Method 4: embed the single character as an eps file \begin{filecontents*}{fich-l.eps} gsave newpath 696 139 moveto 674 62 627 -16 539 -16 curveto 487 -16 430 13 369 49 curveto 336 4 256 -16 209 -16 curveto 121 -16 64 34 64 87 curveto 64 146 114 193 196 193 curveto 236 193 284 171 ...


4

The glyph in question appears to be very similar to the uppercase L provided in the "curly" math font of the MathTime Professional 2 complete font set (commercial fonts). It can be used in three ways: Method 1: change all math fonts to MTPro2 \documentclass{article} \usepackage[mtpccal]{mtpro2} \begin{document} A set of strings is in the class ...


2

You can use the OpenType version of Kerkis (http://iris.math.aegean.gr/kerkis/) and then run xelatex or lualatex: \documentclass{book} \usepackage{pifont} \usepackage{fontspec} \setmainfont[BoldFont=Kerkisbold, ItalicFont=Kerkisitalics]{Kerkis} \setsansfont{KerkisSans} \usepackage[english,greek]{babel} ...


5

You have conflicting font packages. In the first code you have \usepackage{lmodern} after \usepackage{kerkis}, so LaTeX is instructed first to use Kerkis and then to change the font to Latin Modern. Similarly, in the second code you have \usepackage{fourier}, that instructs LaTeX to use Utopia for text and Fourier form math. Remove the call.


1

A partial answer only: the slantsc package allows to add the \scshape information to other shapes. You can take a look at the fbb package documentation. It is an extension of Cardo (a Bembo clone) that has small caps in italic shape and bold weight.


3

To emulate what I think may be the effect of lmodern's lighttt option, you could try the following: \documentclass{article} \usepackage[tt={tabular, lining, monowidth}]{cfr-lm} \newcommand{\myalph}{Aa Bb Cc Dd Ee Ff Gg Hh Ii Jj Kk Ll Mm Nn Oo Pp Qq Rr Ss Tt Uu Vv Ww Xx Yy Zz 0123456789} \usepackage{filecontents} \begin{filecontents}{t1clmt.fd} %Filename: ...


2

In this answer I assume a standard TeX Live is used, not one packaged by Debian, Fedora or similar distributions. Extra material should be installed either in TEXMFLOCAL or TEXMFHOME. The first location is /usr/local/texlive/texmf-local while TEXMFHOME refers to ~/texmf (~/Library/texmf with MacTeX). Fonts should always be installed in TEXMFLOCAL for ...


1

I do not know of such an option within any tex editor. But if you need a quick fix, try saving the document as a .png using GIMP (www.gimp.org). It will rule out any font problems but introduces large file size problems as mentioned by cfr. Providing them with an image for every page rules out any problems other than mismatched rgb/cymk and such.


4

\listfiles \documentclass{article} \usepackage[T1]{fontenc} \usepackage{cmbright} \begin{document} The section character \S\ is not rendering sans-serif. \end{document} gives a sans serif version: If not then have a look into your log file. There must be a warning if a charcter is not available in a specific font. I used an up-to-date TeXLive 2014


2

If you define a short title for your section or chapter, the classicthesis format takes this as your header text as well. With the command \sectionmark{} (and similarly \chaptermark{}) you are able to define a custom header version of your title. In this case, you are forced to use it in order to restore the original title writing. % arara: pdflatex % ...


2

I'm not entirely clear what you want despite the update to your question. Is it something like this? \documentclass{article} \usepackage{listings} % see section 2.2.3 of the mathastext manual 'sans in math' \renewcommand\familydefault\ttdefault \usepackage{mathastext} \renewcommand\familydefault\rmdefault \begin{document} \lstset{escapechar=\⠶} ...


0

I just discovered this similar question, which provides an explanation and correct answer. The mathpazo package works after installing fpl and palatino.


3

The sansmath does \providecommand\sansmathencoding{OT1} at the beginning; this can so be overridden by adding \newcommand\sansmathencoding{\encodingdefault} before loading the package. You also must ensure that fontspec doesn't hijack math codes and fix another setting where sansmath hardwires OT1. For uppercase Greek, EULERGREEK is needed. ...


1

For LaTeX all of your fonts (*.pfb, *.map, ...) are in $TEXMF/fonts or $TEXMFLOCAL/fonts or in $TEXMFHOME/fonts. The style and fd (font definition) files are always under $TEXMF/tex/latex/ For Xe(La)TeX and Lua(La)TeX also in the systems font directories: /usr/share/fonts, /usr/local/share/fonts/ and ~/.fonts/. However, for Xe(La)TeX you have to modify ...


3

I’m not sure that I understand your question; is it the exact form of the vowel mark in the name of God that concerns you? If so, see pp. 21 and 27 of arabdoc.pdf for getting the “dagger alif” in arabtex. I don’t know whether you can get it in arabtex without using the ASCII input notation. In arabxetex, you can get it, at least in some readily available ...


4

Assuming this is just an exercise, the trick is to load define a font specification for the font you intend to use. We can read the file t1txr.fd and use the data slightly modified: \documentclass[11pt,a4paper]{article} \DeclareFontFamily{T1}{txrnumbers}{} \DeclareFontShape{T1}{txrnumbers}{m}{n}{<->s*[1.2]t1xr}{} ...


3

You can have only upright greek letters: \setmathfont[math-style=upright,vargreek-shape=unicode]{Neo Euler}


3

Here, I build my own, by taking the \pounds from the CM font and overlaying the crossbar with white rules. EDITED to handle different text and math sizes. \documentclass[12pt]{article} \usepackage{xcolor,stackengine} \def\cobham{\ifmmode% \mathchoice{\xcobham}{\xcobham}{\scriptsize\xcobham}{\tiny\xcobham}% \else% \xcobham% \fi} ...



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