Tag Info

New answers tagged

2

There seems to be a bug in fontspec version 2.4a, when defining the Renderer key. The following works; code is like in fontspec-xetex.sty and 3 has been changed into 4, as Graphite is choice number 4. \documentclass{article} \usepackage{fontspec} \ExplSyntaxOn \keys_define:nn {fontspec-renderer} { Renderer .choice_code:n = { \int_compare:nTF ...


1

I found a solution: instead of defining a new font family, I can change the main font: \newcommand\Smbd[1]{\setmainfont{Source Sans Pro Semibold}#1\setmainfont{Source Sans Pro}} This is a rather ugly trick, but it does the job.


3

You could set Latin Modern as the main font if you like it for the Latin range, and then use CMU Serif as a fallback font for higher Unicode ranges. Depends on how much higher Unicode you need. I still hope someone can devise a mechanism for an automatic font-fallback system like in CSS. (Define fallback font for specific Unicode characters in LuaLaTeX) ...


2

The Latin Modern font family is available in OpenType format as well; see The Latin Modern (LM) Family of Fonts site. Even better, it's distributed with both TeXLive and MikTeX. (Am I maybe missing something about capabilities of CMU that are not available in LM?) Thus, you could write % !TEX TS-program = lualatex \documentclass{scrartcl} ...


1

You have two possibilities. 1 – Use fouriernc with TeX Gyre Schola as text font \documentclass{article} \usepackage{amsmath} \usepackage{fouriernc} \usepackage[no-math]{fontspec} \usepackage{lipsum} \setmainfont[Scale=0.93]{TeX Gyre Schola} \begin{document} \lipsum*[2] \begin{equation*} \widehat{bcd} \ \widetilde{efg} \ \dot A \ \dot R \ {\ddot A ...


2

Standard pdflatex fonts have some glyphs not there where lualatex expects thems. This doesn't show when the text uses only ascii. But try out this document with lualatex to see the problems with fouriernc: \documentclass{article} \usepackage{fouriernc} \begin{document} Euro: € Sharp s: ß \end{document} Compare it with the fontspec output: ...


3

Don't load the fonts with the relative path. Load them by their font names and specify the ExternalLocation key to point to your folder: \documentclass{article} \usepackage{fontspec} \setmainfont[ExternalLocation=Fonts/]{AGaramondPro-Regular.otf}% [Ligatures=TeX, BoldFont=AGaramondPro-Bold.otf, ItalicFont=AGaramondPro-Italic.otf, ...


0

Here is a very simple solution which I use when I'm forced by editors to use the Times New Roman font, which have no Small Caps implemented. Since I want to leave the rest of my document intact, I simple redefine \textsc in the following way: \renewcommand{\textsc}[1]{{\footnotesize \uppercase{#1}}}


2

It seems like a bug in fontspec; you can cure it by specifying FakeSlant=0 for the small caps font. \setmainfont{Latin Modern Roman}[ SmallCapsFont={Linux Libertine O}, SmallCapsFeatures={Scale=0.5,FakeSlant=0}, SlantedFont={Linux Libertine O}, SlantedFeatures={FakeSlant=0.5}, ] Note that I used the most recent version of fontspec, where the ...


2

You should never use \fontspec inside the document; it's a generic command used by the user level commands \setmainfont, \newfontfamily and similar. Also \setmainfont should only be used in the preamble. I removed the \setmainfont declaration just to show how the font is chosen independently of the main font. The key is to use the short key in \newacronym. ...


0

After fiddling around with the same issue, I found the source of the «bug». It was the «Wordspace» feature. I am not quite sure that the «Letterspace» definition takes care of the spaces as well. \documentclass{article} \usepackage{blindtext} \usepackage{fontspec} \setmainfont[SmallCapsFont={Latin Modern Roman Caps}, ...


1

See two marked bits (otherwise the tic labels are set in math mode by default) \documentclass[12pt]{standalone} \usepackage{tikz} \usepackage{pgfplots} \usepackage{fontspec} \usepackage{ebgaramond}%<=== think you needed this - you presumably have the font locally otherwise \begin{document} \pgfplotsset{every axis/.append style={ line width=.5 pt, tick ...


5

Use \setmainfont{Fontin Regular}[SmallCapsFont = Fontin SmallCaps] (newer syntax), or \setmainfont[SmallCapsFont = Fontin SmallCaps]{Fontin Regular} (older syntax).


4

A good starting point is, as already stated, the google font catalog. One nice site to download commercial free fonts is fontsquirrel.com. Font quality is here in general good. The open font library provides a small amount of commercial free and open source fonts. Another site is dafont.com. Fonts are not always commercial free, though. Quality ...


13

There exists a handwritten font which realizes the exactly connecting letters without compromises. This is the font slabikar generated by Metafont, see the article about it. This font is called slabikar because this is handwritten font used for pupils in the first class when they are learning to read and write in Czech republic. The slabikar is typical ...


1

It seems that \sloppy is the only option. as explained in here.


2

I think you're looking for the ifplatform package. Shell escape must be enabled for this to work, but try the following: \documentclass{article} \usepackage{ifplatform} \usepackage{polyglossia} \usepackage{fontspec} \iflinux \setmainfont{Liberation Serif} \else \ifwindows \setmainfont{Times New Roman} \fi \usepackage{lipsum} \begin{document} ...


2

Yes, you can, provided you properly define the font. \documentclass{article} \usepackage[quiet]{fontspec} \newfontfamily\dejavu[% DejaVu Sans Extension = .ttf, BoldFont = *-Bold, ItalicFont = *-Oblique, ]{DejaVuSans} \begin{document} \textbf{\dejavu\addfontfeature{BoldFont = *-BoldOblique}Test} \end{document}



Top 50 recent answers are included