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13

One option using TikZ; the fit library was used just to draw the outer frame; depending on the actual requirements, this can be done without the library (see second example code below): \documentclass{article} \usepackage{tikz} \usetikzlibrary{fit} \begin{document} \begin{tikzpicture}[ mytext/.style={ draw, text width=#1, align=center, minimum ...


9

Basically, this is using the example of the stackengine documentation, adapted for use in math mode with the addition of \stackMath in the preamble. The routine you want is \stackinset which has 6 arguments, \stackinset{H-anchor}{H-offset}{V-anchor}{V-offset}{inset}{underlying anchor image}. As shown here, it can be nested and the insets themselves can be ...


8

I followed the procedure described in Creating Logo with Fancy Font to create the S-logo as a vector graphic: Now you can add a \skype command to the moderncv interface, specifically the casual theme: \makeatletter % defines one's skype (optional) % usage: \skype{<email adress>} \newcommand*{\skype}[1]{\def\@skype{#1}} ...


6

Indeed, compiling the example file with latex and dvipdfm gives the wrong result; I don't know why, but the support of EPS files within dvipdfm is not really good and also in other cases I had problems. For instance, when I was developing gmp, in order to get compatibility with XeLaTeX, that uses xdvipdfmx internally (which in turn is based on dvipdfm(x)), I ...


6

Quoting from the beamer package documentation In beamer, a presentation consists of a series of frames. So, you need \begin{frame}{<frametitle>} and \end{frame}. \documentclass{beamer} \begin{document} \begin{frame}{A nice slide} \begin{exampleblock}{This is an example} Some text \end{exampleblock} \begin{block}{Solution:} \begin{itemize} ...


5

The variable containing the paths is \Ginput@path, so you can define \makeatletter \newcommand\appendtographicspath[1]{% \g@addto@macro\Ginput@path{#1}% } \makeatother and \appendtographicspath{{../images/}} should do. Remember the braces around the path; you can add several paths. This addition is global. You might want to extend the macro for ...


5

Package graphics provides \graphicspath that allows to specify further directories for the search path of image files: \documentclass{article} \usepackage[utf8]{inputenc} \usepackage[T1]{fontenc} \usepackage{graphicx} \usepackage{subfiles} \begin{document} Main file \graphicspath{{sub/}} \subfile{sub/sub.tex} \end{document} Or \graphcispath can be ...


4

\documentclass{article} \usepackage{pst-node,pst-blur} \begin{document} \newpsstyle{Dashed}{linestyle=dashed,shadow=false,blur=false,fillstyle=solid} \begin{pspicture}[showgrid=false,arrowscale=2,shadow,blur,framearc=0.05](-1,-1)(14,11) \psframe[blur=0,framearc=0,fillcolor=black!10,fillstyle=solid](-0.5,-0.5)(13.5,10.5) ...


4

Just the symbol: \documentclass[tikz]{standalone} \begin{document} \begin{tikzpicture}[y=0.08em,x=0.08em,xscale=-0.25,yscale=--0.25, inner sep=0pt, outer sep=0pt] \path[fill=black,even odd rule] (487.6550,288.9690) .. controls (489.0610,278.5690) and (489.8700,267.9960) .. (489.8700,257.2330) .. controls (489.8700,128.0770) and (384.5990,23.3610) ...


4

Here is some dirty way: \documentclass{beamer} \usetheme{Warsaw} \usepackage{tikz} \usetikzlibrary{fadings} \setbeamertemplate{background}{% \begin{tikzpicture} \path (0,0) rectangle (\paperwidth,\paperheight); \begin{scope} \clip (0,0.5\paperheight) rectangle (\paperwidth,\paperheight); \path[scope fading=north,] (0,0.5\paperheight) rectangle ...


3

I'll show you how to stack external files on top of one another in the manner you want, assuming you've got the ticks, axes labels and titles of the main square images in the external files. I used the file you linked in your comment for the bottom layer, and since there were no other ones (and the higher ones are different - no axes labels), I used some ...


3

Method A: Dealing directly with PostScript Since you're dealing with PostScript images, one option might be to use GhostView; I've done so successfully in the past. As an example, consider tiger.eps. Open tiger.eps using GhostView. Show the bounding box if you wish to see the extent of the existing whitespace: Position the cursor on to identify the ...


2

You can use epspdftk, the gui interface to Siep Kroonenberg's epspdf .texlua script. It exists both for Windows and Linux and does everything (converting and cropping the resulting .pdf) in one step. I'll take the example of one of my old graphic files, produced with pstricks and pst-eps, that had a (very) badly computed bounding box. The procedure is very ...


2

The picture environment exported from jPicEdt is really peculiar, as it builds a line by placing multiple short segments next to each other; the result is a jagged line. You can resize your picture by changing \unitlength: \documentclass[12pt]{article} \begin{document} \begin{figure}[htbp] \centering \setlength{\unitlength}{2pt} % double the size ...


1

use subfigure ! How about this code : \usepackage{graphicx} \usepackage{caption} \usepackage{subcaption} \begin{figure} \centering \begin{subfigure}[b]{0.5\textwidth} \includegraphics[width=\textwidth]{pic1} \end{subfigure} \begin{subfigure}[b]{0.5\textwidth} ...


1

Firstly, the GIMP does appear to be an adequate and convenient tool for the job. EPS files seem to include a default resolution, which is what the GIMP displays when you open an EPS file, so don't change it: Next, you can easily use your cursor to find one of two defining coordinates. In this example we do the top-left coordinate. You can see the ...



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