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4

A quick hack, not really customizable so far... Redefine \@seccntformat for \section, this displays the section number in the section header and add some change for \addcontentsline. \documentclass{book} \usepackage{xpatch} \usepackage{tikz} \usetikzlibrary{shadings} \DeclareRobustCommand{\shapecircle}[1][0.2]{% \begin{tikzpicture}[scale=#1] ...


4

The main part of the code you quote is \setbox\z@\hbox{\csname Ginclude@#1\endcsname{#3}}% which calls \Ginclude@xxx where xxx is the file type (determined from the extension or passed as an key to \includegraphics) so if xxx is eps this will call \Ginclude@eps and if the driver specified (in an option or set in graphics.cfg) is dvips then dvips.def will ...


4

Here's an implementation with a patched and redefined \includegraphics. Currently, the width of the filename is not accounted for, but one can do that by changing the T argument to F in the \stackengine argument list. The underset gap of the filename is currently 3pt. Note that the filename is generated properly, regardless of whether the extension was ...


3

You are really trying to make your questions difficult to read. Why are you adding all these unnecessary details? If you want to test if an graphics exists you can try this: (from Check for a valid file before using \includegraphics) \documentclass[]{article} \usepackage{graphicx,todonotes} \makeatletter \newif\ifgraphicexist \catcode`\*=11 ...


3

The ICO format is an extension of the BMP graphics format in Windows. For the latter, it was already asked here if they can be included in LaTeX documents. Since the answer back then was negative (without conversion), the same applies here as well. Note that ICO files can include multiple versions of an icon, so take care to convert the right one. XeLaTeX ...


2

Seems to work if you add \protect before \includegraphics, i.e. \section{Habilitaciones por (valided by) \protect\includegraphics[height=1cm,valign=c]{example-image-16x10}} To use the valign=c key, which aligns the image vertically centered on the line, you need to add \usepackage[export]{adjustbox} to the preamble. \documentclass[10pt,a4paper]{moderncv} ...


2

You can use a \makebox if you want the graphics to stick out on both sides: \documentclass{article} \usepackage[T1]{fontenc} \usepackage{graphicx,lipsum} \begin{document} \lipsum[1] \centering \makebox[\linewidth]{\includegraphics[width=1.5\linewidth]{example-image}} \end{document}


2

- won't be the problem (unless you are using a language that declares it to be a babel shortcut) but spaces in filenames are evil:-) If you must have spaces, it probably works to quote them as \graphicspath{% {"C:/Users/Username/Documents/Project 1 - Project Title/Project Writeup/Project/Graphics/"}% } but not having spaces is good. Also the grffile ...


1

It is unlikely to be related to the disk type. I note that the typeset file path in your top image has dropped the accented u and shows Sade so most likely tex isn't understanding the character encoding used in filenames.


1

Ok, here we go... I figured you could figure how to plop the graphic element up top. %------------------------------------------------------------------------ ---------------- % PACKAGES AND OTHER DOCUMENT CONFIGURATIONS %------------------------------------------------------------------------ ---------------- \documentclass{scrartcl} ...



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