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3

A quick hack, not really customizable so far... Redefine \@seccntformat for \section, this displays the section number in the section header and add some change for \addcontentsline. \documentclass{book} \usepackage{xpatch} \usepackage{tikz} \usetikzlibrary{shadings} \DeclareRobustCommand{\shapecircle}[1][0.2]{% \begin{tikzpicture}[scale=#1] ...


2

- won't be the problem (unless you are using a language that declares it to be a babel shortcut) but spaces in filenames are evil:-) If you must have spaces, it probably works to quote them as \graphicspath{% {"C:/Users/Username/Documents/Project 1 - Project Title/Project Writeup/Project/Graphics/"}% } but not having spaces is good. Also the grffile ...


1

It is unlikely to be related to the disk type. I note that the typeset file path in your top image has dropped the accented u and shows Sade so most likely tex isn't understanding the character encoding used in filenames.


3

The ICO format is an extension of the BMP graphics format in Windows. For the latter, it was already asked here if they can be included in LaTeX documents. Since the answer back then was negative (without conversion), the same applies here as well. Note that ICO files can include multiple versions of an icon, so take care to convert the right one. XeLaTeX ...


2

You can use a \makebox if you want the graphics to stick out on both sides: \documentclass{article} \usepackage[T1]{fontenc} \usepackage{graphicx,lipsum} \begin{document} \lipsum[1] \centering \makebox[\linewidth]{\includegraphics[width=1.5\linewidth]{example-image}} \end{document}


2

Seems to work if you add \protect before \includegraphics, i.e. \section{Habilitaciones por (valided by) \protect\includegraphics[height=1cm,valign=c]{example-image-16x10}} To use the valign=c key, which aligns the image vertically centered on the line, you need to add \usepackage[export]{adjustbox} to the preamble. \documentclass[10pt,a4paper]{moderncv} ...


3

You are really trying to make your questions difficult to read. Why are you adding all these unnecessary details? If you want to test if an graphics exists you can try this: (from Check for a valid file before using \includegraphics) \documentclass[]{article} \usepackage{graphicx,todonotes} \makeatletter \newif\ifgraphicexist \catcode`\*=11 ...


2

This will not typeset the file name correctly if the file is missing, but it will find and use the image if present and will typeset something similar to the file name otherwise. \documentclass{article} \usepackage{todonotes} \usepackage{graphicx} \usepackage{xparse} \usepackage{caption} ...


2

You can pass the float option to \lstinputlisting to make it float: \documentclass{article} \usepackage{listings} \lstset{basicstyle=\footnotesize\ttfamily} \usepackage{lipsum} \begin{document} \lipsum[1] \lstinputlisting[caption={Hello}, float]{main.c} \end{document} There's also this question and its answers which have solutions for avoiding page ...


1

Here, I use a \raisebox wrapped inside a macro named \Includegraphics (capital "I"). The key is knowing the proper downward vertical shift of the image, which is otherwise aligned to the baseline. That shift, in this case, is -.5\dimexpr\height-\ht\strutbox+\dp\strutbox, which will work regardless of image height and font size. \documentclass{beamer} ...


2

As you discovered, # is a special character for TeX. If you don't plan to need things like \includegraphics[...]{./subdir/#1-1.png} but you just type the file name, you should be able to do with a new command: \makeatletter \edef\harry@hash{\string#} \newcommand{\hashincludegraphics}[2][]{% \includegraphics[#1]{\harry@hash#2}% } \makeatother and use ...


2

Just try this: \fbox{\includegraphics[width=\textwidth,center,cfbox=blue 1pt 1pt,fbox,frame]{name.png}} Put "width" as first option in your includegraphics. Another idea is to change margins just for the image using package changepage, like this: In preamble put: \usepackage{changepage} An then use it adjusting relative to previous margin: ...


1

Slightly adopted @egreg answer in given link (that now you have two figures and not sub-figures): \documentclass{article} \usepackage{graphicx} \usepackage{subcaption}% added for test in parallel with @egreg solution \usepackage{showframe}% only for show page layout. in real use it had to be omitted! % new lengths and save boxes \newlength{\twosubht} ...


1

Perhaps something like this: \documentclass[12pt]{article} % the showframe option is used to visualize the output \usepackage[showframe]{geometry} % packages mwe and lipsum are simply for this example \usepackage{mwe, lipsum, graphicx, float} \usepackage[justification=centering]{caption} \usepackage{subfig} \newlength\halfwd \newlength\halfwdsep ...


3

Here's a version with tikz nodes overlaying an image and placing \hyperlinks with \nameref{...} to the sections: The node positions are up to the user! \documentclass[oneside]{article} \usepackage{blindtext} \usepackage{tikz} \usepackage{graphicx} \newcommand{\namereflink}[1]{% \nameref{#1}% % Or use % ...


2

Consider the following 4-page document: \documentclass{article} \usepackage{graphicx,lipsum} \begin{document} \lipsum[1-5] \begin{figure}[ht] \centering \includegraphics[width=.5\linewidth]{example-image-a} \caption{This is figure A} \end{figure} \lipsum[6-10] \begin{figure}[ht] \centering ...


2

You can use demo as an option to article class. Since mdframed loads graphicx you don't need to load graphicx (and that's the cause of the clash initially) In any case, the demo option must be known to mdframed before it loads graphicx with other (conflicting) options. This is a general rule, not restricted to graphicx etc. Another example could be the ...


2

Move the call to graphicx before mdframed: \documentclass{article} \usepackage[demo]{graphicx} \usepackage[framemethod=tikz]{mdframed} % \begin{document} \includegraphics{blub} \end{document} Or pass the option: \documentclass{article} \PassOptionsToPackage{demo}{graphicx} \usepackage[framemethod=tikz]{mdframed} % \begin{document} ...


2

So this is just a starting point but almost all necessary ingredients are nicely explained in the pgfplots manual. \documentclass[border=3mm]{standalone} \usepackage{pgfplots} \usetikzlibrary{intersections} \usepgfplotslibrary{fillbetween} \pgfplotsset{compat=1.13} \begin{document} \begin{tikzpicture} \begin{axis}[ axis lines=left, xtick={0.5}, ...


0

One solution would be using pdfLatex with the combination of following packages: \usepackage{graphicx} \usepackage{epstopdf} Here, your eps figures will be converted to pdf formats.


1

If you read IEEEtran documentation will see that it recommends not using subfigure package but subfig. And an example with subfig is explained in it. What I understand you want is something like this: which can be obtained with following code: \documentclass{IEEEtran} \usepackage{lipsum} \usepackage{graphicx} \ifCLASSOPTIONcompsoc ...


0

A better version to hide the entire picture but keep the space is to use the phantom command \phantom{\includegraphics[...]{picture}} This avoids white text, could for example be selected in the pdf. PS: not enough repo to comment on Dennis' answer.


1

I'd suggest setting all the pseudo-subfigures inside a tabular: \documentclass{article} \usepackage{graphicx} \begin{document} \begin{center} \begin{tabular}{ *{5}{c} } \small A & \small B & \small C & \small D & \small E \\ \includegraphics[height=1cm]{example-image} & \includegraphics[height=1cm]{example-image} & ...


3

You can either add the image within the node or add the image in its own node after the tree is drawn either directly or using tikz. Either way, you can do this either for specific nodes within the tree or for all nodes assigned a certain style. The image can be specified as part of the style or it can be determined when the style is used. The following ...


2

Like this? \documentclass{article} \usepackage{tikz} \usetikzlibrary{patterns} \begin{document} \begin{tikzpicture} \draw (0,0) --++(90:3cm); \fill[pattern=north west lines] (0,0) rectangle ++(-1,3); \draw (2,0) --++(90:3cm); \fill[pattern=north west lines] (2,0) rectangle ++(1,3); \draw (0,2) sin ++(1,1) cos ++(1,-1); ...


3

REVISED ANSWER Upon comment from the OP, it became more clear that the OP desired to have a transparent signature image overlay the page text. The problem with my original solution was that the image was laid down prior to the name, and thus underlaid the name. Attempting to make the signature a \stackon overlay to the name also did not work, because the ...


2

there is a \dotplus symbol in the amsfonts collection. insert \usepackage{amssymb} in your preamble. then you can use \dotplus (in math) in the body of your document. amssymb loads amsfonts automatically, so you get access to a lot of other math symbols as well. actually, this question should be considered a duplicate of How to look up a symbol or ...


0

If you're compiling your LaTeX in the directory where your *.tex file is, and your graphics are in the same folder, you don't need to set your graphics path


3

In order to use \includegraphics you need to add \usepackage{graphicx} in your preamble (at the beginning of your document). And fix the \newcommand{} statement like this: \documentclass{article} \usepackage{graphicx} \newcommand{\dotplus}{\includegraphics[width=0.2in]{/dotplus.jpg}} \title{} \author{} \date{} \begin{document} \dotplus \end{document}


3

Two changes were needed. First, to remove the matrix from the equation* environment, and instead place it between $ delimiters, with \displaystyle added, if needed. This will keep the matrix symmetric about the math axis, without any line feeds and spaces interjected. Second, the image, which is otherwise sits on the baseline, had to be surrounded with ...


3

The vertical distance between \caption and the image (or whatever) can be controlled with \captionsetup{skip=...} where ... stands for some appropiate value. The standard value for article, report and book is 10pt. Please note that the caption manual clearly states that still the class or another package might take control of the skip between figure or ...


1

Here is a simpler solution. I used \tempheight to equalize the heights and \raisebox to align the bottoms. The only adjustment needed is to fit the page. \documentclass{article} \usepackage{graphicx} \usepackage{siunitx} \usepackage{showframe}% check centering \newlength{\tempheight} \begin{document} \begin{figure} ...


4

Here is my suggested (even if bulky) answer. centering: It uses \minipages (since you already know it will be 3 rows and 2 colums) + \hfill, and \adjustboxes with valign=t,center option for centering the last one. adequate size We use the trick given in Scale included graphics to the higher ratio instead of the lower for given width, height : using the ...


2

Replace "some text" with a \parbox. The \parbox will wrap automatically, or linebreaks \\ can be manually added. \documentclass{memoir} \usepackage{graphicx} \begin{document} \begin{figure}[h] \centering \includegraphics[width=0.4\columnwidth]{example-image} \put(-80,20){\parbox{.5in}{some text}} \end{figure} \end{document} Alternately, ...


7

Why not using \phantom, in a wrapper command named, say \phantomgraphics? I've added a \ifphantomgraphics conditional to enable or disable the phantom feature. Just say \phantomgraphicsfalse to disable all up-coming phantoms and really use \includegraphics.... The draft key feature is really nice, but unfortunately it draws a frame and prints the file name ...


0

You should use the good old \includegraphics AND notice LaTeX to recognize the .png format (\DeclareGraphicsExtensions). \documentclass{article} %% ... \usepackage{epsfig} %=>\includegrapics \DeclareGraphicsExtensions{.pdf,.eps,.png,.jpg} %% ... \begin{document} %% ... \thispagestyle{empty} % to avoid page numbering on cover page %% ... ...


1

\documentclass{book} \begin{document} \tableofcontents \listoffigures \chapter{First} \begin{figure} \caption{First figure from chapter \thechapter} \caption{Second figure from chapter \thechapter} \end{figure} \chapter{Second Chapter} \begin{figure} \caption{First figure from chapter \thechapter} \caption{Second figure from chapter \thechapter} ...


7

You could at least fake like you're trying.. \documentclass{standalone} \usepackage{bm} \usepackage{tikz} \usetikzlibrary{patterns,calc} \begin{document} \begin{tikzpicture} \pattern[pattern=north east lines,thin] (0,0) rectangle (12,-.5 ); \draw (0,0) -- (12,0); \draw[very thick] (3,0) rectangle +(6,3); \draw[very thick,blue,->] ...


0

Ok, for the first time help is needed. Enjoy \documentclass{standalone} \usepackage{tikz} \begin{document} \begin{tikzpicture}[scale=1] \draw[dashed,black,fill=red!30, opacity=0.5] (-2,0) -- (2,0) -- (2,3) -- (-2,3) -- cycle; \draw[ultra thick,color=black] (-3,0) -- (3,0); \draw[thick,->,color=black] (.2,1.5) -- (2.5,1.5) node[above] {$F$}; ...


4

Another option is to add \usepackage[export]{adjustbox}, and then add valign=t to the options of \includegraphics. \documentclass{book} \usepackage[demo]{graphicx} \usepackage[shortlabels]{enumitem} \usepackage[export]{adjustbox} \begin{document} \begin{enumerate}[(a)] \item $3,6,9,12, \dots$ \item $3,5,7,9,11, \dots$ \item $2,3,5,7,11,13, ...


4

Your problem comes from the fact that graphics are laid on the base line. A solution uses \raisebox: \documentclass{book} \usepackage[demo]{graphicx} \usepackage[shortlabels]{enumitem} \begin{document} \begin{enumerate}[(a)] \item $3,6,9,12, \dots$ \item $3,5,7,9,11, \dots$ \item $2,3,5,7,11,13, \dots$ \item ...


1

I am not sure if this meant, but defining a fading style, say middle, will provide the fading downto the middle. Please note that due to the mirroring top and bottom are reversed. \documentclass{article} \usepackage{tikz} \usepackage{xcolor} \usepackage{graphicx} \usetikzlibrary{shadows,fadings} \begin{document} \pagecolor{black} \tikzfading[name=middle, ...


1

If it is only about the picture and it should not be floatable you can also try this (it will force(!) the picture to the top by definition): \documentclass[twocolumn]{article} \usepackage{lipsum} \usepackage[demo]{graphicx} \newcommand\ImageOnTop[2][]{% \def\toppic{\includegraphics[#1]{#2}\vspace{2em}} \twocolumn[\toppic] } \begin{document} ...


2

figure*-environments will always be placed at earliest on the next page. So you either need to move the code in your document. Or you can try the stfloats which will place the figure on the current page if it is defined in the first column. \documentclass[twocolumn]{article} \usepackage[showframe]{geometry}% http://ctan.org/pkg/geometry \usepackage{lipsum}% ...


0

Similar question is quit common on SE, so it is probably duplicate, but anyway since I didn't check this ... Your MWE is not complete and have some spurious code, so the answer below is based on guessing. In it I use article for document class, but I'm sure that convert basic idea in MWE to your poster class should be straightforward. ...


0

Another option is to use \linewidth instead of \textwdith which has the advantage that it is clear that the image is part of the current item. References: Difference between \textwidth, \linewidth and \hsize Code: \documentclass{article} \usepackage{graphicx} \usepackage{lipsum} \usepackage{showframe} %\usepackage{enumitem} \begin{document} ...


2

You have two possibilities: discontinue itemize for inserting image define new environment, which will do this just for image. In second case try: \documentclass{article} \usepackage{changepage} \makeatletter \newenvironment{restoretext}% {\@parboxrestore% \begin{adjustwidth}{}{\leftmargin}% }{\end{adjustwidth} } \makeatother ...


0

A simpler solution would be... \includegraphics{{"../Current folder/1.This file"}.png} (For Windows users,) note that the slashes all need to be forward slashes.


0

The answer is simple. No need to change your existing file names or use a different package. Do 2 things: Use {} to encircle your file name so that \includegraphics does not see the dots and spaces in your path; Use "" inside the {} so that the filename is not displayed in your pdf printout. Example: \usepackage{graphicx} \begin{document} ...



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