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1

The best is not having braces in the file name to begin with; the grffile package allows file names with multiple periods in them. If you can't do with it, you can use the facility already present in LaTeX for getting a file name: \documentclass{article} \usepackage{marginnote} \usepackage[demo]{graphicx} \usepackage{hyperref} \makeatletter ...


2

As I already wrote in a comment: the most probable source for a difference between the pdflatex and the latex+dvips route are not embedded fonts. Your pdf's show exactly this difference. pdflatex embeds fonts for the text (nimbus in this case, "eingebettet" means embedded): But dvips doesn't and so the fonts provided by "the system" are used: On my ...


0

To place all three subfigures side by side in a row, each subfigure's width has to be less than 0.333\textwidth. If you choose 0.3\textwidth as the width for the subfigures, use \hspace{\fill} (or \hfill) the spacing directive between the subfigures, to obtain the maximum possible separation (of 0.05\textwidth) between the subfigures. ...


0

You can divide the space into three equally spaced columns and place each figure in each column and replace height= by scale=XX where XX is a number (if XX < 1 it reduces your figure, if $XX > 1$ it will augment the size of your figure). You will have to play a little bit with this number, but in my experience that allows you to have more flexibility with ...


3

This has been encountered before, see also: \includegraphics and \includepdf both remove all copy (text) from my (R outputted) pdf graphs, using pdfTeX So as I was suspecting it's a font problem. You can compile your document using XeLaTeX (or XeTeX), not pdflatex. \documentclass{standalone} \usepackage{graphics} \begin{document} ...


2

It's easy to do with the floatrow package, which is is dedicated to that, cooperates with the caption package: \documentclass[a4paper, 11pt]{article} \usepackage[utf8]{inputenc} \usepackage{lipsum} \usepackage{graphicx} \usepackage{floatrow} \DeclareFloatVCode{rowsep}{\vskip 5ex} \begin{document} \begin{figure} [H] \centering\floatsetup{floatrowsep ...


2

You can use minipages inside the figure environment with a caption command for each figure: \documentclass{article} \usepackage{lmodern} \usepackage{graphicx} \begin{document} As you can see in figs.~\ref{fig:left} and \ref{fig:right} \dots \begin{figure} \centering \begin{minipage}{0.49\textwidth} \centering \includegraphics[width = ...


1

I used the positioning library: \documentclass{article} \usepackage{tikz} \usetikzlibrary{quotes,angles,positioning} \begin{document} \begin{tikzpicture} \draw (0,0) node[below]{$O$} circle (2); \coordinate (A) at (120:2); \node at (A) [above = 1mm of A] {$A$}; \coordinate (B) at (210:2); \node at (B) [below left = 1mm of B] {$B$}; ...


4

A PSTricks solution using the pst-circ package: \documentclass{article} \usepackage{pst-circ} \newcommand*\Node[1]{\uput[90](#1){#1}} \begin{document} \begin{pspicture}(9.2,1.35) % boundry found manually \psset{arrows = *-*} % definition of node positions \pnodes(0.1,0.5){A}(3.1,0.5){B}(6.1,0.5){D}(9.1,0.5){E} % electrical components ...


2

There are syntax errors, several commas at the end of lines (after the coordinates specification and in the middle of the node statement. \boxplotvalue{<key>} expects the key without additional parentheses. node[above] places the node above the specified coordinate. 0.5 instead of 1 places the node in the middle in the box plot coordinate system. ...


1

May be is not what you wanted (since you have accepted a answer with two subcaptions) but is what your asked ("the second must not be given a caption"): \documentclass{article} \usepackage{graphicx,lipsum} \begin{document} \lipsum[2] \begin{figure}[h] % Do not use only [h] in real documents. \begin{minipage}[t]{.45\linewidth} ...


3

You can use the subcaption package. Try something like this. \documentclass{article} \usepackage[english]{babel} \usepackage{graphicx} \usepackage{subcaption} \begin{document} \begin{figure} \centering \begin{subfigure}{0.49\textwidth} \centering \includegraphics[width = \textwidth]{tikzexample2.png} \caption{Left figure} \label{fig:left} \end{subfigure} ...


7

Here is a circuitikz solution. You may like the circuitikz input format but not like the shapes/sizes of the components; in that case, there are many options described in the package manual and in the code if you wish to explore and do some tweaking for your own circuit diagrams. \documentclass{standalone} \usepackage[ europeanresistors, ...


7

I don't know circuitikz, but here is a solution utilizing the TikZ library circuits. \documentclass{article} \usepackage{tikz} \usetikzlibrary{circuits.ee.IEC} \begin{document} \begin{tikzpicture}[circuit ee IEC] \path node [contact] (A) {} ++(right:2) node [contact] (B) {} ++(right:2) node [contact] (D) {} ...


10

Here's a modified version of piano.sty that adds also the function you ask for. Also the syntax is changed, but I believe it's better than adding a bunch of optional arguments. xpiano.sty \ProvidesPackage{xpiano}[2015/05/21 from piano.sty by Émile Daneault] \RequirePackage{xcolor} \usepackage{xparse} \definecolor{pianodefault}{RGB}{255,127,0} ...


6

Converting .jpg photographs to .png isn't a great idea in general. LaTex will be showing the file as it is and I think ignores the orientation tag. When you view the file elsewhere it may be rotated (or might not) depending on how the viewer uses the tag, and it can all get very confusing. I suggest removing the orientation tag altogether. This is best ...


2

You can include the image in the background, setting it in a tikzpicture that takes up no vertical space and where we can move objects as we please. The important thing is to draw the background picture before any other thing is printed. I assume that the three images have the same height. In the third \subfloat, I just place a couple of invisible rules to ...


0

Compiling your code does yield something quite similar to what you've posted here. But we can get it closer. I don't have Minion, so I'm simply using Computer Modern. What you'd probably like to do is define a new column type, to clear up your \begin{tabular} line, and so that you only have to change it in one place if you decide you'd like the columns to ...


0

With MetaPost: input latexmp setupLaTeXMP(textextlabel=enable, mode=rerun, packages="amsmath"); numeric u; u = .75cm; pair beta, re, im; beta = (u, 3u); re = (5u, 0); im = (0, 5u); beginfig(1); z = u*(3, 1.5); for M = re, im, beta, z+beta: drawarrow origin -- M; endfor drawarrow z--z+beta; drawoptions(dashed evenly); draw origin--z; draw beta ...


10

Here is one way to do this. The interesting part is the use of pic to draw your little squares by defining a new "picture" called mysquare. These squares take two arguments: the colour and the label. The arguments MUST be given as {#1, #2} or tikz will complain with cryptic error messages. In particular, note that there needs to be a space after the comma! ...


5

With \pstricks (can be compiled under conditions with pdflatex): \documentclass[pdf]{standalone} \usepackage{pstricks-add} \usepackage{amsmath} \DeclareMathOperator\re{Re} \DeclareMathOperator\im{Im} \begin{document} $ begin{pspicture} \psset{ticks=none, labels=none, arrowinset=0.2,arrows =c->, labelsep=3pt} \psaxes{c->}(0,0)(5,5)[$\re ...


5

Since you deal with vectors I suggest to use polar coordinate system instead Cartesian: \documentclass[tikz,border=3mm]{standalone} \usetikzlibrary{arrows.meta} \usepackage{amsmath} \begin{document} \begin{tikzpicture}[>={Straight Barb[]}] \draw[very thin,<->] (0,4) node[below left] {$\Im(z)$} -- (0,0) -- ...


5

Here's a slightly different approach using TikZ that uses the vector arithmetic of the calc library to place some of the arrows. \documentclass{standalone} \usepackage{tikz} \usetikzlibrary{calc} \usetikzlibrary{arrows.meta} \begin{document} \begin{tikzpicture}[>=Stealth] \coordinate (Q) at (0,0); \coordinate (RE) at (4,0); \coordinate (IM) at ...


6

You can try using pgfplots and tikz. It's quite easy. The figure might look something like this. \documentclass{article} \usepackage[english]{babel} \usepackage{amsmath} \usepackage{pgfplots} \usepackage{tikz} \begin{document} \begin{tikzpicture} \draw [<->] (0,4) node[left]{$ \text{Im} (z) $} -- (0,0) -- (4,0) node[below]{$ \text{Re} (z) $}; \draw ...


0

Here's my solution ... \documentclass[11pt,a4paper,twocolumn]{article} \usepackage{caption} % controls how captions are typeset \usepackage{lipsum} % for typesetting dummy text \usepackage{booktabs} % for "fancy" tables! \usepackage{multirow} % text that spans across multiple rows ...


0

@egreg's answer works, but is more of a work-around than a solution. What if you don't want to decrease the width of your subfigure, and still prevent captions from overlapping? The simple solution is to call the subfig package with margin options. Like this: \usepackage[margin=20pt]{subfig} This will add a nice padding around the sub-figure captions, ...


3

Forcing a float in-place can be obtained using float's [H] float specification (see How to influence the position of float environments like figure and table?). In order to replicate the style of the given table, I'd suggest using a combination of array (for column definition/alignment), tabularx (for ease of specifying a stretchable column) and booktabs ...


5

Here's a solution in asymptote using recursion. Just change the first five lines of the code to modify the output. Make sure the number of initial values is a power of 2 or it will probably throw an error. unitsize(1inch); real xspacing = 0.5; real yspacing = 0.5; pair[] values = { (1,1), (7,9), (2,8), (8,6) }; string[] labels = { "$y_i$", "$d_2$", ...


4

Starting with Ben's tikzpicture module, and turning it into a macro \blivet[supress top #]{top-left #}{top-right #}{width} has allowed me a start on it. More automation remains to be done. The height of the blivets are defined with \def\blivetheight{3}. \documentclass[a4paper]{article} \usepackage{pgfplots,stackengine} ...


6

I also suggest Tikz, but more specifically the Tikz trees. Probably you could automatise this but I can't think of a way so the solution is manual. I was going to provide a small sample for you to complete, but I had already finished it on my own, so here it is. Basically the level distance is 2cm but the middle child is shifted down of 1cm so it's midway ...


0

To do this in LaTeX, I think you want to take a look at the subfig package. The documentation is clear and well-written, and it seems to provide the facilities you want. That, combined with Ryan's answer about figures spanning columns in multicol, should get you what you want. (Ryan's answer will also get you there by itself; but there is a package for ...


6

My first choice would be pgfplots and tikz. It lets you draw right in Latex. You can try something like this: \documentclass[a4paper]{article} \usepackage{pgfplots} \usepackage{tikz} \tikzset{>=stealth} % arrowheads \begin{document} \begin{tikzpicture} \draw [->] (12,4)node[above]{24} -- (8,0)node[below]{42}; \draw [->] ...


3

Your image makes it look smaller than I expect. and smaller than I get with pdflatex, but you have the arguments the wrong way round, they are read left to right so you need \documentclass{memoir} \usepackage{graphicx} \begin{document} \begin{figure} \centering \includegraphics[width=\textheight,height=\textwidth,keepaspectratio,angle=90]{bhuta1.JPG} ...


1

Here's how to position figures across the columns of multicol: \documentclass{article} \usepackage{multicol} \usepackage{lipsum} \usepackage{mwe} \begin{document} \begin{multicols}{2} \begin{figure*}[ht!] \includegraphics[width=.3\textwidth]{example-image-a}\hfill ...


0

Here is a way to do what you want maybe it is not the best but it does the work, use multicol package and just play with the \columsep and the scale of the image and for the figure name use caption package as the code below \documentclass{article} \usepackage{multicol} \usepackage{graphicx} \usepackage{caption} ...


1

Do you want something like this? \documentclass[12, twoside]{report} \usepackage{graphicx} \usepackage[a4paper,margin=1in]{geometry} \usepackage{lscape} \usepackage{rotating} \usepackage{pdflscape} \begin{document} \begin{landscape} \begin{figure}[htbp] \centering \fbox{\includegraphics[width=\linewidth, height=\textheight,keepaspectratio]{results.png}} ...


1

REVISED ANSWER based on OP reply to "original answer". This produces squiggly x-shaped crossout through individual words. Rather than perform the trigonometry to calculate the squiggle angle, I set up a series of dimensional comparisons. More can be added if needed. \documentclass{article} \usepackage{stackengine,graphicx,xcolor,ulem} \def\crossout#1{% ...


0

A different approach using TikZ: \documentclass[a4paper,11pt]{memoir} \usepackage[utf8]{inputenc} \usepackage[T1]{fontenc} \usepackage{tikz} \usetikzlibrary{decorations.pathmorphing} \newcommand{\crossout}[1]{\raisebox{-0.2mm}{% \tikz{\draw(0,0) node[anchor=west,inner sep=0,text depth=0.2mm](crossedWord){#1}; ...


1

Define this command with the ulem package: \newcommand{\waveout}[1]{\raisebox{4pt}{\uwave{\phantom{#1}}}\llap{#1}} and use it as \waveout{word} \documentclass{article} \usepackage{pict2e} \usepackage[normalem]{ulem} \pagestyle{empty} \makeatletter \newcommand{\crossout}[1]{% \begingroup \settowidth{\dimen@}{#1}% \setlength{\unitlength}{0.05\dimen@}% ...


1

You could try with \usepackage{grffile} \begingroup\catcode`\%=12 \def\x{\def\strangepath{Q:/2014 - 2015/Change (%)}} \expandafter\endgroup\x in your document preamble and \includegraphics{\strangepath/Graphic Name.png} in the document.


3

Filenames with spaces and percent :( You could \@percentchar instead of % if @ is a letter at that point, or locally put \catcode`\%=12 before the \includegraphics, to make % a normal character. You need " .. " around the filename as well because of the spaces.


0

If you prefer, you can do this kind of thing outside of latex easily with imagemagick. The +5+10 part controls the location of figure1 on figure2. composite -geometry +5+10 figure1.png figure2.png new.png


0

This can pretty easily be done with TikZ, as @Ignasi suggested in his comment. Obviously you'll have to tweak the widths of the included graphics... \documentclass{article} \usepackage{graphicx} \usepackage{tikz} \newlength\imagewidth \newlength\imagescale \begin{document} \begin{figure} \centering \includegraphics[width=0.618\linewidth]{img1} ...


2

Best here would be to define group-specific key-value options. This would allow you to set a single option associated with the group, while LaTeX manages the back-end setting for the option. As an example of this, add the following to your Document > Settings... > LaTeX Preamble: \usepackage{xkeyval} \define@boolkey{Gin}{groupAoptions}[true]{% ...


0

Two options that come to my mind: Open picture in InDesign, color with appropriate pantone, save as PDF and include. (I am kind of afraid of such a long chain tiff -> InD -> pdf -> pdf). Will the final result display the pantone correctly? Redraw picture as a vector image in Inkscape, export to Tikz and include. (This will result in some loss, because the ...


7

Here is a suggestion using scrlayer to define a new pagestyle. \documentclass[12pt,a4paper]{article} \usepackage[utf8]{inputenc} \usepackage[T1]{fontenc} \usepackage[english]{babel} \usepackage{tikz}% loads also graphicx, xcolor \usepackage{lmodern} \usepackage[top=1.25in, bottom=1.25in, left=1.25in, right=1.25in]{geometry} ...


8

Package adjustbox Your preamble already contains package adjustbox. It provides the features you need for trimming and clipping I am not sure, which spacing is needed around the image. The following example lets the image behave as it would have the height of the upper case letter H and the depth of g. \documentclass[12pt,a4paper]{article} ...


1

Add x tick label style={font=\footnotesize, text width=3cm, align=center} to the axis options. It will reduce the font, and provide a maximum text width of 3cm, which is enough for (genes) to go to a new line. Output Code \documentclass{standalone} \usepackage{pgfplots} \pgfplotsset{compat=1.8} \usepgfplotslibrary{statistics} \begin{document} ...


0

Thanks for the answer. I would like to ask a couple of more problems. First, I want to place the images in the upper right corner of every page, but no matter how much I change the y in this command, \animatexy{10.5cm}{12.cm}{image_} the images don't go higher. Second, I would like to place the images only in even pages of the book. I have posted the code ...


4

All the file input tests use \input@path as well as the standard TEXINPUTS variable, personally I find it easier to just set TEXINPUTS rather than use \input@path (\graphicspath just sets a version of \input@path used locally during the scope of \includegraphics) However if you want to use the macro directory list for all such operations, replace ...



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