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0

I have found a possible solution from Cropping/Trimming an image with includegraphics by specifying percentages Trying the following TeX code: \adjustbox{trim=5cm 5cm 5cm 5cm, clip}{\includegraphics[page=2]{source.pdf}}


-1

I have found a possible solution from Cropping/Trimming an image with includegraphics by specifying percentages Trying the following TeX code: \adjustbox{trim=5cm 5cm 5cm 5cm, clip}{\includegraphics[page=2]{source.pdf}}


3

For pdftex users the \pdfximage approach might seem appealing. The \pdfximage command creates an image object. The dimensions can be controlled in a similar way to a rule, i.e. \pdfximage width ... height ... depth ... <general text> where <general text> is the file name. (\pdfximage has many more parameters which can be looked up in the ...


1

If you use pdftex inserting images is as easy as \pdfximage width 3cm {example-image-a.pdf} \pdfrefximage\pdflastximage \bye


1

The template uses the macro \titleGP to define the title. You can use \includegraphics inside the definition of the macro (\titleGP) where it suits best. But as always, i do not recommend using templates from this site.


4

If I were you, I would do the following: In order to make your common settings accessible for all figures, diagrams, documents, etc, put the settings into a single package, namely, mycommon.sty. Register this package globally so you can use it throughout your projects. If you don't know how to do this, see my answer here (click). If you want your diagram ...


9

Just set draft=false for the picture you want to be shown anyway: \documentclass[draft]{article} \usepackage{graphicx} \begin{document} \includegraphics[width=50pt]{example-image-a} \includegraphics[draft=false,width=50pt]{example-image-b} \includegraphics[width=50pt]{example-image-c} \end{document}


6

Create a macro \includegraphicsfinal (say) which will always be set in final mode, regardless of whether your document is set in final or draft mode: \documentclass[draft]{article} \usepackage{graphicx} \makeatletter \newcommand{\includegraphicsfinal}[2][]{{% \Gin@draftfalse% Turn draft mode off \includegraphics[#1]{#2}}% Include graphic ...


1

Picking up on David Carlisle's suggestion, but using a second minipage to centre the image while not having it bump against the margin. (Obviously, possible without this, too.) \documentclass[a4paper]{article} \usepackage[left=0.75cm,right=0.75cm, top=0.75cm, bottom=1cm]{geometry} \usepackage{multicol,lipsum,graphicx} \begin{document} ...


1

Why not wrapfig inside multicol? \documentclass{article} \usepackage{multicol,wrapfig,graphicx,lipsum} \begin{document} \begin{multicols*}{2} \lipsum*[1] \begin{wrapfigure}[10]{l}[0pt]{3.5cm} \rule{3cm}{9\baselineskip} % Or: your figure: %\includegraphics[width=3cm]{<filename goes here>} \end{wrapfigure} \lipsum[2-4] ...


5

You can use any latex drawing package to draw over an image, tikz, pstricks or here I just use the standard latex picture commands, enhanced via the pict2e package. \documentclass{article} \usepackage{graphicx} \usepackage{pict2e} \begin{document} Original: \includegraphics{man} enhanced \includegraphics{man}% \begin{picture}(0,0) ...


2

I have created a hack that works. I'm using biblatex. In a .bib file there is this entry: @Misc{crete, addendum = {Bull-leaping in Crete.}, annotation = {Bull-leaping in Crete. Photo by Wolfgang Sauber, Wikimedia Commons.} } The image file is named crete.jpg. I created a \Figura command with this definition: ...


0

As suggested in a comment, the hobete shows one way to do this: alter the frametitle template. As this is 'standard' beamer it's easiest done without the extras of the package: \documentclass{beamer} \setbeamertemplate{frametitle} {% \nointerlineskip \begin{beamercolorbox} [wd=\paperwidth,dp=1ex, ht=4.5ex, sep=0.5ex, colsep*=0pt]% ...


3

This should be the right definition for your command \qweq: \newcommand{\qweq}[4][!htbp]{% \begin{figure}[#1]% \centering% \includegraphics[width=9cm]{/images/task#2/#3}% \caption{\emph{\small{#4}}}% \end{figure}% } Note, first of all, that each line is ended by % to avoid spurious spaces (especially in the caption...). Moreover a fourth optional argument ...


2

Didn't know whether the red box was part of the notation or the footer itself (I assumed the latter). I put the text in a \parbox, added some vertical buffer around the \fbox, and I spaced out the items in the footer. If you need actual boxes around the text and page number, let me know. \documentclass[onecolumn]{article} \usepackage{stackengine,xcolor} ...


6

Some thing like this? \documentclass[onecolumn]{article} \usepackage{fancyhdr} \usepackage[export]{adjustbox} \usepackage{lipsum} \pagestyle{fancy} \fancyhf{} \lfoot{\includegraphics[scale=0.3,valign=c]{example-image} \includegraphics[scale=0.15,valign=c]{example-image} Some text to go in the footer} \rfoot{\thepage} \begin{document} ...


4

If I understand well your problem, you should use the cuted package (from the sttools bundle) and its strip environment. Here is an example: \documentclass[twocolumn]{article} \usepackage[utf8]{inputenc} \usepackage[T1]{fontenc} \usepackage{ebgaramond} \usepackage[frenchb]{babel} \usepackage{cuted, xcolor} \usepackage{graphicx, caption, threeparttable} ...


1

The answer by @Werner works great. Just to show some code that corresponds more exactly with the question: \documentclass{article} \usepackage{eso-pic,graphicx} \usepackage[paperwidth=38.205cm, paperheight=19.367cm, margin=0cm]{geometry} \setlength{\parindent}{0cm} \pagestyle{empty} \begin{document} \AddToShipoutPictureBG*{% \AtPageLowerLeft{% ...


3

This is easily achieved using eso-pic as an alternative: \documentclass{article} \usepackage{eso-pic,graphicx} \usepackage[ paperwidth=38.205cm, paperheight=19.367cm, margin=0cm]{geometry} \setlength{\parindent}{0cm} \pagestyle{empty} \begin{document} \AddToShipoutPictureBG*{% \AtPageLowerLeft{% ...


3

You can also use \flushright. Instead of scale you can also just measure the width of the original signature and use that. \documentclass{article} \usepackage{graphicx} \begin{document} \title{\LARGE Thesis Title} \author{Author McAuthorson} \date{\today} \maketitle \begin{flushright} \includegraphics[width=2in]{signature} % adjust width as necessary ...


7

Use a tabular \documentclass[english]{scrartcl} %\usepackage{graphics} %% not needed \usepackage[T1]{fontenc} \usepackage[utf8]{inputenc} \usepackage{babel} \setkomafont{disposition}{\normalfont\bfseries} \usepackage{graphicx} \usepackage[printwatermark]{xwatermark} \usepackage{xcolor} \begin{document} \title{\LARGE Thesis Title} \date{\today} ...


2

A simple solution without additional packages is split your card in four minipages. By default the minipages are centered vertically, so this work to center images and/or anything else. \documentclass{article} \usepackage{graphicx} \def\Img#1{\includegraphics[width=\linewidth]{example-image-#1}} \def\Family{\centering\Large\textsc{Family Name ...


1

You could use TiKZ to create an overlay image that does not disturb the rest of the layout. I don't know what packages you used to create the screenshot above, so I could not reproduce exactly your layout. That is one of the reasons why we insist on providing a minimum working example, (MWE) -- see my comment above. The following should get you started ...


6

Here is a tikz solution \documentclass{article} \usepackage{tikz} \begin{document} \begin{tikzpicture} \node[inner sep=0pt,outer sep=0pt,text width=0.5\textwidth] (a) {\includegraphics[width=\linewidth]{example-image-a}}; \node[outer sep=0pt,text width=0.5\textwidth,align=center,anchor=west] at (a.east) {Family Name Here \\ ...


5

Centred vertical alignment of graphics is easily obtained with the help of adjustbox, which provides the valign key-value option. Below is a minimal example showing its use in your case: \documentclass{article} \usepackage[export]{adjustbox}% adjustbox loads graphicx \begin{document} \noindent ...


4

As it stands, your document does not contain enough text for LaTeX to put the figure at the top of a page. On the first page, floats at the top are banned. There is no second page (of text). So, having the figure left at the end of the document, LaTeX does whatever it must to place it: it puts it on a page of floats and, by default, that means the floats are ...


0

\usepackage{float} \begin{figure}[H] This will force LaTex to put your figure where you want it to be.


2

Just to get you started... \documentclass[tikz,border=5]{standalone} \usepgfmodule{nonlineartransformations} \makeatletter \def\transformA{% \pgfgetlastxy\xx\yy% \pgfmathparse{\xx*(1+\yy/250}\let\x=\pgfmathresult \pgfmathparse{\yy*(1+\xx/250}\let\y=\pgfmathresult \pgfmathparse{\x*cos 15+\y*cos 165}% \pgf@x=\pgfmathresult pt \pgfmathparse{\y*sin ...


2

How about using a tabular environment, the precise order depends on the size of the photograph paper? \documentclass{article} \usepackage[a4paper,lmargin=0.5cm,rmargin=0.5cm,tmargin=0.2cm,bmargin=0.2cm]{geometry} \usepackage[demo]{graphicx} \usepackage{calc} \usepackage{ifthen} \newlength{\oH} \newlength{\oW} \newlength{\rH} \newlength{\cH} ...


11

Presumably (you did not say) you are using lualatex or xelatex. These engines do not work with inputenc methods. The class seems to make assumptions about use of inputenc so it is only written for latex or pdflatex.


1

Just go to "Project" and upload the missing files via the "Add files…" button, since the files have to be on the server, that is running writeLaTeX. In this case the file has to be named picture.<file-ext>, as this part of the code implies: \photo[64pt][0.4pt]{picture} If you don't want a photo, you can also just comment out this line (it's line ...


2

\documentclass{article} \usepackage{graphics} \usepackage{media9} \usepackage{mwe} \begin{document} \mediabutton[ jsaction={app.alert('hello world!');} ]{\includegraphics{example-image}} \end{document}


5

You can include the company logo as part of the title in your style file. Here's an example: \documentclass{scrartcl} \usepackage{filecontents} \begin{filecontents*}{company_style.sty} \ProvidesPackage{company_style} \RequirePackage{graphicx} \let\oldtitle\title \renewcommand{\title}[1]{\oldtitle{% Company XYZ \\[\bigskipamount] ...


2

Just for fun: from the good answer of Mark Wibrow I have made the following code. It is not optimal, but it creates filled triangles when the intersection of the three neighbourhood corresponding to the vertices of the triangle is not empty: \begin{frame}[label=persistence] \animate<1-27> \scalebox{.8}{% \begin{columns} \begin{column}{5cm} ...


1

Thanks to http://tex.stackexchange.com/users/2388/ulrike-fischer, the problem is solved. If converted as I stated in the question, the jpg gets a default resolution of 72 x 72, which would make the image about 27' wide. Changing the conversion to: convert -units PixelsPerInch small_orig.png -density 600 small_test2.jpg And it works fine. Thanks all


0

Problem was that as far as LyX is concerned .sty files are raw LaTeX, hence only the file gets copied to the temporary directory where LyX does the compilation but not the dependencies referenced in that file - these get resolved only for .lyx files. I went with using an absolute path \graphicspath{{/home/username/latex/example/images/}}. That's going to ...


1

You first need to save/calculate the real width of the table \newsavebox\tableBox \sbox\tableBox{\begin{tabular}{rrrr...}...\end{tabular}} % without the \multicolumn line then \resizebox{\textwidth}{!}{% \begin{tabular}{rrrr...} ... \multicolumn{9}{p{\wd\tableBox}}{...} \end{tabular}% } Full example: \documentclass{article}% ...


1

Better to use threeparttablex, though it is not perfect (a little too wide in the right) \documentclass{article}% \usepackage{graphicx} \usepackage[referable]{threeparttablex} \begin{document} \noindent \rule{\textwidth}{1mm} \noindent \resizebox{\textwidth}{!}{% \begin{threeparttable} \begin{tabular}{rrrrrrrrr} \hline aaaaaaaa & aaaaaaaa & ...


0

This works with pdf files, but not png of jpg. I guess it depends on the viewer. \documentclass{article} \usepackage{graphicx} \usepackage{hyperref} \let\oldincludegraphics=\includegraphics \renewcommand{\includegraphics}[2][]{\href{#2}{\oldincludegraphics[#1]{#2}}} \begin{document} \noindent\centering\includegraphics[width=\textwidth]{test.pdf} ...


1

If you are willing to define your figures (and/or tables) with macros, rather than environments, the boxhandler package has figure/table deferral, using the macros \holdFigures and \clearFigures. In both approaches, commenting a single line of code changes the figures from appearing inline to being collected at the end of the document. APPROACH 1: Using ...


3

It would help more if you made the example a complete document but anyway that D is dcolumn syntax so most likely adding \usepackage{dcolumn} to the preamble will fix the problem, although that is untested as you have not provided a test file.


18

For the first part of the requirements, the TikZ \foreach command can parse a list of coordinates which can be stored in a macro. The following illustrates how it can be done. It should be straightforward to adapt the code for the required use-case: \documentclass[tikz,border=5]{standalone} \begin{document} \def\pointlist{ (1.0,1.0), (2.3,1.1), (4.5,0.8), ...


1

The command to scale an image is \includegraphics[scale=0.5]{burnsideTri.png} (not 0.5cm). If you want to give a certain width, it would be width=0.5cm. You should load graphicx instead of graphics as the prior is much more modern (and I never used the latter, so maybe the scaling will not work, I dunno). Just in order to show you, what an MWE is. ...


3

You can make things tighter by reducing the level and sibling distances, using a smaller font etc. etc. but forest does a good job of packing stuff in. The edge path is adapted from Gonzalo Medina's answer. \documentclass[tikz,border=5pt]{standalone} \usepackage{forest} \begin{document} \begin{forest} for tree={ grow=east, parent ...


2

Starting with my answer at What are the ways to position things absolutely on the page?, I modified it to increment a counter and use it to build successive indexed filenames. I manually add a stop so that if the page number exceeds the maximum filename index, it just stays on the last filename. The macro \animatexy{x}{y}{filename root} is the syntax. I ...


3

You can't (in general) convert it. What you can do is include it into a fig object so that you can use xfig to add lines and text to the image. Use the picture tool to drag a rectangle to hold the EPS then just browse to add the EPS.


1

Looking at the output of bmeps -h on the terminal, we see the following options: bmeps [options] [ <inputfile> [ <outputfile> ] ] Options ------- -p <pslevel> select one of the following 1 (PS level 1) 2 (PS level 2 = default) 3 ...


5

Don't change the textwidth, just hide the width of the image. \begin{center} \makebox[0pt]{\includegraphics{...}} \end{center}


1

The only format you can include while compiling with latex is eps, so if you wish to compile with latex instead of pdflatex you will need to convert your figures into eps format. pdflatex, on the other hand, allows you to use pdf, png, jpg, and eps (via epstopdf).


2

Here is a sample: \documentclass{scrartcl} \usepackage[usenames,x11names,dvipsnames,svgnames]{xcolor} \usepackage{tikz} \usetikzlibrary{decorations, decorations.text} % tight page \usepackage[active,tightpage]{preview} \PreviewEnvironment{tikzpicture} % \begin{document}% \begin{tikzpicture} % outer circle \draw[line width=2 ...



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