Tag Info

Hot answers tagged

43

use xelatex or lualatex. Then it is really simple: \documentclass[12pt]{article} \usepackage{fontspec} \setmainfont{DejaVu Serif} \begin{document} foo φύσις bar \end{document}


28

If you just need a few words, then a simple approach can solve your problem: \documentclass{article} \usepackage[LGR,T1]{fontenc} \newcommand{\textgreek}[1]{\begingroup\fontencoding{LGR}\selectfont#1\endgroup} \begin{document} physics (from ancient greek \textgreek{f'usis}) \end{document} For longer passages, perhaps loading the polutoniko option with ...


26

You can pass the options [greek,english] to the babel package. Then you can switch between them using \greektext and \latintext. \documentclass{minimal} \usepackage[greek,english]{babel} \begin{document} \greektext A whole paragraph in greek letters \latintext % If we only want a single letter, it might make sense to define commands: ...


18

You can create a Greek equivalent by taking the code of e.g. \alph from the file latex.ltx and modify it to get what you want. It also requires a slight modification to the subequations environment from amsmath. \documentclass[11pt,a4paper]{article} \usepackage[T1]{fontenc} \usepackage[latin1]{inputenc} \usepackage{amsmath} \makeatletter ...


17

For the case of units, you should use the siunitx package. \documentclass{article} \usepackage{siunitx} \begin{document} The average time of this event is \SI{50}{\micro\second}. \end{document} I guess I should mention the upgreek package. The average time of this event is 50~$\upmu$s. but this doesn't look as good.


17

Does \widetilde{\phi} work for you? If you enter this in http://www.codecogs.com/latex/eqneditor.php, it produces a nice Phi with Tilde.


16

Uppercase epsilon is E. \begin{equation} \delta % ok \Delta % ok \epsilon % ok E % ok \end{equation}


15

To quote from The LaTeX Companion (p. 527), Those capital Greek letters not present in this table are the letters that have the same appearance as some Latin letter. Similarly, the list of lowercase Greek letters contains no omicron because it would be identical in appearance to the Latin o. Thus, in practice, the Greek letters that have Latin ...


15

since many of the greek uppercase letters have the same shape as latin letters, they were not separately provided for tex, for two reasons: to save space (which was a real consideration in 1980); because it wouldn't be possible to tell the difference between the two shapes. the first reason is no longer relevant, of course, but the second is. go ahead ...


14

Computer Modern's greek (bottom) font is (loosely) based on Monotype's 155M Greek font (top): The Monotype 155M font itself is related to the Porson greek font, which was one of the most used typeface for greek in english speaking countries. One of the characteristic of this font is that it has upright capitals but slanted lowercase. This might seem ...


14

I think the amount of work needed wouldn't warrant the advantages of using greektex at all. May I ask what exactly you're using it for? If I'm reading this correctly, it's a package which breaks exactly everything LaTeX is doing nowadays in the inputenc/fontenc area. The goal of greektex is to support a set of fonts called ywclr which are, AFAICS, only ...


14

The lipsum package uses \roman{lips@count} to build a control sequence name; but the Greek module for babel changes the meaning of \roman making it not fully expandable. Solution: patch the relevant command: \documentclass[a4paper,11pt]{article} \usepackage[english,greek]{babel} \usepackage{kerkis} \usepackage{lipsum} \usepackage{etoolbox} \makeatletter ...


14

The command \[\mu\] is a short version of \begin{equation*} \mu \end{equation*} which is normally used for longer formulas. If you want to typeset (short) formulas like μ, you should use the inline-math mode, i.e. This is an example text containing the greek letter $\mu$.


13

I’ll throw this in here, as my search for a solution led me here, but my problem was another one. Using XeTeX and Latin Modern, I found that the greek letter μ does not work. However, the Unicode micro sign μ does work. Knowing that, I added \sisetup{math-micro=\text{µ},text-micro=µ}, and now all seems well. To clarify, use µ MICRO SIGN Unicode: U+00B5, ...


13

The mbboard package provides blackboard bold Greek letters, and the letter you want is \bbmu. However, I don't know if you like how the symbol looks. (I don't like it, actually.) The mathbbol package with the bbgreekl option also provides (a possibly nicer version of) \bbmu: Use \usepackage[bbgreekl]{mathbbol} in the preamble. The disadvantage is that the ...


13

You have to assign a meaning to the Unicode characters you're using and that aren't set by default. Here's a way. \begin{filecontents*}{\jobname.bib} @article{concellon_synthesis_2006, title = {Synthesis of Enantiopure ({αS,βS)-} or ({αR,βS)-β-Amino} Alcohols by Complete Regioselective Opening of Aminoepoxides by Organolithium Reagents {LiAlH4} or ...


12

You don't need the isomath package: \DeclareMathSymbol{\Gamma}{\mathalpha}{operators}{0} \DeclareMathSymbol{\Delta}{\mathalpha}{operators}{1} \DeclareMathSymbol{\Theta}{\mathalpha}{operators}{2} \DeclareMathSymbol{\Lambda}{\mathalpha}{operators}{3} \DeclareMathSymbol{\Xi}{\mathalpha}{operators}{4} \DeclareMathSymbol{\Pi}{\mathalpha}{operators}{5} ...


12

As @Seamus correctly points out, capital Rho has the same glyph as capital P. You can put \newcommand{\Rho}{\mathrm{P}} into your preamble to make the macro \Rho avialable. The usage of \mathrm is necessary if you use default math alphabets, because all greek capitals are typeset in up-right font. List of those Greek letters whose capital variants coincide ...


11

A problem is that \textbeta gets redefined, so the definition performed by textgreek is lost. Moreover, the Latin Modern fonts don't support Greek. Here is a hack, I guess there are better ways to do it. \documentclass{article} \usepackage[LGR]{fontenc} \usepackage{chemmacros} \protected\def\Chembeta{\text{\fontencoding{LGR}\fontfamily{cmr}\selectfont ...


10

LuaLaTeX is your choice! Greek is possible without any adjustments. Hebrew, as it is a language from right to left, needs adjustments. Of course, you need to use \usepackage{fontspec} in the preamble (as is usual when using LuaLatex). Greek You need a font that supports all the accents. If your mainfont for latin text does not support them, you need to ...


10

See the image below: it is the default w in math mode.


10

hmmmm The Unicode definitions for theta are: U+03b8 GREEK SMALL LETTER THETA U+03d1 GREEK THETA SYMBOL With the first of those being the one in your question, and the second being the more curly open one. However in the encodings set up by the ucs package a U+03b8 character will by default give you \texttheta (which would probably give you the right ...


10

You could use the package upgreek (part of the "was" bundle of LaTeX packages, where "was" is short for Walter A. Schmidt...), which provides the math-mode macros \upalpha, \upbeta, etc. \usepackage[Symbol]{upgreek} \newcommand{\eneutrino}{\ensuremath{\upnu_e}} \newcommand{\belectron}{\ensuremath{\upbeta^{-}}} ...


10

David's point is worth underlining: So basically, nobody would use a capital epsilon in a formula because it'd be visually indistinguishable from E. If you wanted to type something actually in Greek, then you would use one of the packages designed for that (search on CTAN for "greek" to get an idea of what's available). The Greek letters that are ...


10

There is no difference. The character Σ is translated into \u8:Σ which is a single macro whose name is five character long, because Σ is two byte in UTF-8. This macro, in turn, is translated into \IeC{\textSigma} and, in a typesetting context, it becomes \textSigma The definition of this macro is \LGR-cmd \textSigma \LGR\textSigma which is three ...


9

The two forms \epsilon and \varepsilon are just graphical variants of the same letter and using both unnecessarily confuses readers. The pslatex package is obsolete and deprecated. You should have \usepackage{mathptmx} instead. Which doesn't solve your problem, anyway, because the Symbol font used for Greek letters doesn't have different glyphs for the ...


9

Taking inspiration from T.D.'s excellent answer, I wrote a small package to add extra counter output types. As well as greek, it defines binary, hexadecimal, and "First, Second, Third...". morenum.sty on github moreenum on CTAN


9

Here is a MWE which compiles fine, using the command @daleif suggested \documentclass[a4paper,final]{article} \usepackage[T1]{fontenc} \usepackage[]{lmodern} \usepackage[utf8]{inputenc} \usepackage[ngerman]{babel} \usepackage[]{siunitx} \usepackage{textcomp} \begin{document} Greek letter \textmu{} in normal text. Greek letter µ in normal text. The ...


9

The following works: one has to pass the unicode option to hyperref and also a correct Unicode string for the bookmark: \documentclass{scrbook} \usepackage[utf8]{inputenc} \usepackage[greek,english]{babel} \usepackage[unicode]{hyperref} \usepackage{bookmark} \begin{document} \mainmatter \chapter{Introduction} An introduction. \cleardoublepage ...


9

It's not at all difficult, if you have an up-to-date TeX distribution. % !TEX encoding = UTF-8 \documentclass{article} \usepackage[LGRx,T1]{fontenc} \usepackage[utf8]{inputenc} \usepackage[greek]{babel} \begin{document} Η Αθήνα (Ἀθῆναι στα αρχαία ελληνικά και την καθαρεύουσα) είναι η πρωτεύουσα της Ελλάδας. Επίσης είναι η έδρα της Περιφέρειας Αττικής. ...



Only top voted, non community-wiki answers of a minimum length are eligible