New answers tagged

1

You can use tempora. I recommend switching to UTF-8 rather than ISO-8859-7, in any case. \documentclass{article} \usepackage[iso-8859-7]{inputenc} \usepackage[greek,english]{babel} \usepackage{tempora} \begin{document} Some English text \begin{otherlanguage*}{greek} Ελλάδα \end{otherlanguage*} \end{document} If you also need math, add \usepackage{...


0

Imho the best is to switch to xelatex or lualatex: %utf8 encoded! \documentclass[10pt]{article} \usepackage{fontspec} \setmainfont{Times New Roman} \begin{document} Ελλάδα \end{document}


0

Well, whatever will mean circumflex (we could have a historical conversation here), the sign you mentioned is also called, in actual typography, tilde. You can add a tilde on Greek symbols declaring Greek, or for old Greek polutonikogreek in the babel preamble declaration. Don't even know if you have to declare it, I think basic Greek is included in babels ...


7

There's a text command in package tipa called \textscomega which seems to do what you want. You can define \newcommand{\scOmega}{\text{\textscomega}} and use \scOmega in your document as in the following example: \documentclass{article} \usepackage{amsmath} \usepackage{tipa} \newcommand{\scOmega}{\text{\textscomega}} \begin{document} \begin{equation*}...


3

Find a font with the required glyph (not GFS Porson, which hasn't it) and use \newunicodechar for choosing it. \documentclass{scrartcl} \usepackage[no-math]{fontspec} \usepackage{polyglossia} \usepackage{newunicodechar} \setmainlanguage[variant=ancient]{greek} \setmainfont{GFS Porson} \newfontfamily{\greekfont}{GFS Porson} \newfontfamily\digammafont{...



Top 50 recent answers are included