Tag Info

New answers tagged

0

Finally I find the answer from this post: \documentclass[a4paper]{article} \usepackage{fontspec} \usepackage[Greek]{ucharclasses} \newcommand{\mylatin}{\renewcommand\rmdefault{lmr}\renewcommand\sfdefault{lmss}\renewcommand\ttdefault{lmtt}} \newfontfamily\mygreek{CMU Serif} % \setDefaultTransitions{\fontfamily{lmodern}\selectfont}{} ...


1

Try the following code: \documentclass[12pt,a4paper]{article} \usepackage[Latin,Greek]{ucharclasses} \usepackage{fontspec} \newfontfamily\mynormal{Palatino Linotype} \setDefaultTransitions{\mynormal}{} \newfontfamily\mygreek{Junicode} \setTransitionsForGreek{\mygreek}{} \usepackage{lipsum} \begin{document} \lipsum[1] Πέτρος ἀπόστολος Ἰησοῦ Χριστοῦ ...


3

The \pdfstrcmp primitive performs expansion: the linked answer does mention that the argument needs to be a 'string'. For comparing arbitrary input, prevent expansion using \unexpanded: \documentclass{article} \usepackage[utf8]{inputenc} \setlength\parindent{0pt} \usepackage{siunitx,microtype,textcomp,textgreek} \newcommand{\evaltest}[2]{% ...


1

Does it have to be pdfstrcmp? If not, you should look into etoolbox. E.g.: \documentclass{article} \usepackage[T1]{fontenc} \usepackage[utf8]{inputenc} \setlength\parindent{0pt} \usepackage{etoolbox} \usepackage{siunitx,microtype,textcomp,textgreek} \newcommand{\evaltest}[2]{% \ifnum\pdfstrcmp{#1}{#2}=0 #1 equals #2% \else #1 does ...


2

You have to add support for Greek to begin with. The simplest way is to use babel: \documentclass[a4paper,10pt]{report} \usepackage[T1]{fontenc} \usepackage[utf8]{inputenc} \usepackage[greek,english]{babel} % Definitions \usepackage{pdflscape} \usepackage[height=25cm]{geometry} \usepackage{timetable} \begin{document} \thispagestyle{empty} \begin{landscape} ...


5

Here, I take Bruno's answer at Shear transform a "box", and use it to unslant the computer-modern greek letters. I introduce \unslant[slant]{math-symbol}, where the default value of unslant correction is set to -0.25. As you can see, the unslanted font is very visually very compatible with the original, both of which are shown. No packages ...


3

Latin Modern math doesn't blend with Times New Roman. You're better using NewTX: \documentclass{article} \usepackage{newtxtext,newtxmath} \begin{document} The text is in Times; $\lambda\lambdaup$. \end{document} If you insist in using Latin Modern math symbols, here's how you can do: \documentclass{article} \usepackage{amsmath} \usepackage{lmodern} ...


1

If you are able to use Lua- or XeLaTeX, I would recommend the package unicode-math: % arara: lualatex \documentclass{article} \usepackage{unicode-math} \usepackage{fontspec} \setmainfont{Times New Roman} \usepackage{blindtext} \begin{document} \blindtext $\mathup{\lambda}\lambda$ \end{document}


2

You can make the utf8 handling more robust: \documentclass[ngerman]{scrbook} \usepackage{savesym} \usepackage[LGR,T1]{fontenc} \usepackage[utf8]{inputenc} \input{ix-utf8enc.dfu} \usepackage[math=normal,main=ngerman,greek,]{babel} \usepackage{teubner} \savesymbol{breve} \savesymbol{aa} \usepackage[osf,sc]{mathpazo} \restoresymbol{pplj}{breve} ...


2

The main problem is bad interaction with tabularx: stating \selectlanguage{polutonikogreek} in the prefix to an X column causes errors that are amplified by teubner; but without it the problem is still present causing \textpi to be considered undefined. A temporary workaround might be delaying the language setting when the paragraph is started: ...


6

If using either XeLaTeX or LuaLaTeX is an option for you, you may want to use the Cambria Math font. The following table contrasts the looks of w and \omega, as well as looks of the notoriously-similar triple v, \upsilon, and \nu. Clearly, w and \omega are very different if Cambria Math is loaded. Pagella, a Palatino clone, arguably does a credible job as ...



Top 50 recent answers are included