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2

The problem is that \unslant put the unslanted character on the right edge of the space originally needed for the slanted version. The following variation centers the unspanted character in the same space. \documentclass{article} \usepackage{mathtools} \newsavebox{\foobox} \newlength{\foodim} \newcommand{\slantbox}[2][0]{\mbox{% \sbox{\foobox}{#2}% ...


6

As can be seen in the answers to your other post, you have to define your symbols after the start of your document. % arara: lualatex \documentclass[a4paper]{article} \usepackage{unicode-math} \AtBeginDocument{% \let\phi\varphi \let\epsilon\varepsilon } \begin{document} \noindent varphi: $\varphi$ works!\\ phi: $\phi$ should look the ...


3

Is this close enough? \documentclass{article} \usepackage{amsmath} \begin{document} \[\mathcal{E} \varepsilon \] \end{document}


1

I made two adjustments to your MWE I did a small \mkern and minus \mkern around each character to better align them with the slanted counterparts; and More importantly, I used the \ThisStyle{...\SavedStyle...} syntax of the scalerel package to preserve the math style of the argument. Here is the MWE. \documentclass[a4paper]{article} ...


3

Since the qoppa is a stylized symbol, there's probably no need to try and find a version suitable for any font. Since you want it in math, the simplest thing is to define a stripped down version of the LGR encoding. \documentclass{article} \usepackage{amsmath,pdftexcmds} \DeclareFontFamily{U}{cbgreek}{} \DeclareFontShape{U}{cbgreek}{m}{n}{ ...


7

Just make \anw@true the same as \anw@false; I'll show a second level enumerate, with subcaptios it will be the same, as they use the Greek version of \alph as well. \documentclass{article} \usepackage{ifxetex} \ifxetex \usepackage{fontspec} \usepackage{polyglossia} \setmainfont{Old Standard} \setmainlanguage{greek} \else \usepackage[T1]{fontenc} ...


2

Do you know which math font, or which font family, is used by the journal from which you excerpted the formula? Lacking this information, it's not likely that speculation as to which math font might be most appropriate will be all that fruitful. At any rate, the \varrho glyph you show looks very much like what's produced by the Computer Modern and Latin ...



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