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Instead of \textbf use \boldsymbol (load the amsmath package to get it) to get it bold, put everything in math mode, and to get it upright use the upgreek package and \uptheta instead of theta: \documentclass{article} \usepackage{amsmath} \usepackage{upgreek} \begin{document} $\boldsymbol{\uptheta}$ \end{document} If you do not need it just for one theta, ...


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\usefonttheme{professionalfonts} prevents beamer from overwriting your fonts and is therefore needed to use specified font packages - cfr % arara: pdflatex \documentclass{beamer} \usepackage[T1]{fontenc} \usefonttheme{professionalfonts} \begin{document} \begin{frame} $\operatorname{\delta}d=1$ $\operatorname{\Delta}d=1$ \end{frame} ...


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TeX was designed at a time when using 8bit fonts with 256 characters was considered rather exotic, so while it could do that all the standard fonts only use 128 characters per font. That combined with the limit on 16 math families per expression meant that some "interesting" design decisions had to be made to fit all the required symbols into the space. As ...


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By default, plain TeX and LaTeX typeset the Greek capital letters in roman upright (following the established anglo-american tradition in mathematical typesetting). So, just typing $\Delta$ gives you an upright capital Greek Delta. You have to add some packages to change this behaviour. Comment out your packages until you have found the culprit. P.S. ...


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Your Problem is that you declare ϑ to mean $\vartheta$. Thus as long as you only use text-mode TeX shows no error. Unfortunately your example $ϑ$ will lead to $$\vartheta$$. So you will end up with two (empty) parts of inline math and a \vartheta in text-mode what is not allowed as \vartheta is math-only. As a quick fix one could suggest using ...



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