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4

Apart from the wrong dots, it seems an align*: \documentclass{article} \usepackage[margin=1in]{geometry} \usepackage{amsmath,amssymb} \usepackage{lipsum} \begin{document} \lipsum*[2] \begin{align*} \{B_1,\dots,B\cup\{\lnot\lnot\phi\},\dots,B_i\}\quad & \rightsquigarrow \quad \{B_1,\dots,B\cup\{\phi\},\dots,B_i\} \\ ...


3

Here is one possibility. \documentclass{article} \usepackage{mathtools} \usepackage{empheq} \begin{document} \begin{empheq}[left={\phi(x) =\empheqlbrace}]{align} &-\frac{e^{-\frac{x}{k}}T_0(A)}{2\Big(1+e^{\frac{L}{2k}}\Big)GJ_t}\text{,} & x \in \biggl[0,\frac{L}{2}\biggr], \\ ...


3

Rather than fixing the problem with \pbox and similar hacks, here's how I would typeset this table. First of all, a numeric table should always use siunitx facilities. Second, repeating data is evil. \documentclass[11pt]{article} \usepackage{multicol, booktabs, siunitx} \newcommand\onepc{$^{\ast\ast}$} \newcommand\fivepc{$^{\ast}$} ...


3

A solution with makecell, threeparttable and siunitx: \documentclass[11pt]{article} \usepackage{multicol, booktabs, pbox} \newcommand{\ra}[1]{\renewcommand{\arraystretch}{#1}} \usepackage{makecell, threeparttable} \usepackage{siunitx} \sisetup{table-format = -1.4, table-space-text-post = **} \begin{document} % %\def\sep{0.5em} %\def\fns{\footnotesize} ...


3

Here is one way; using a tabular-like structure: \documentclass{beamer} \usetheme{CambridgeUS} \newcommand{\tabitem}{% \usebeamertemplate{itemize item}\hspace*{\labelsep}} \begin{document} \begin{frame}{Centering the itemize} My first try: Centering the itemize \begin{itemize} \item item1 \item item2 \end{itemize} \begin{center} ...


2

There's no hope of having those long formulas in one line. The denominator is the same, so you can move it in front of \phi(x) The denominators can be split across two or three lines numcases should not be used Example \documentclass{article} \usepackage{amsmath,empheq} \begin{document} \begin{empheq}[ ...


2

That's because you're setting the heading in a \parbox of pre-specified width. Since you're using a manual line-breaking inside these \parboxes, you might just as well set them in a tabular which will expand to the natural width of the content. makecell simplifies this input: \documentclass{article} \usepackage{booktabs,makecell} ...


2

You can use a regular array: \documentclass{article} \usepackage[margin=1in]{geometry}% Just for this example \usepackage[nopar]{lipsum}% Just for this example \usepackage{amsmath,amssymb} \begin{document} \lipsum[1] \[ \begin{array}{r@{\quad\rightsquigarrow\quad}l} \{ B_1, \dots, B \cup \{ \neg\neg\phi \}, \dots, B_i \} & \{ B_1, \dots, ...


1

As David Carlisle wrote above, package varwidth is the way to go. It provides environment varwidth which does what I was asking for. Here is a minimal example to draw text on a gradient shaded background using beamer. \documentclass{beamer} \usepackage{calc,varwidth} \colorlet{titleshadeA}{white!30!orange} \colorlet{titleshadeB}{red!30!black} ...



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