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0

memoir accommodates the use of the caption package. Then you can split out your regular \caption and some referencing scheme (say) \figuresource using \caption*: \documentclass{memoir} \usepackage{graphicx,caption} \newcommand{\figuresource}[1]{% \par\vspace*{-\abovecaptionskip} \caption*{\footnotesize\itshape #1}} \captionsetup{ ...


4

I'd avoid unbalanced conditions, readers knows that they should look for the variable and the mixed right-left alignment is awkward. There is an easy possibility for aligning the variables, that is, using interval notation: \documentclass{article} \usepackage{mathtools} \begin{document} \begin{equation}\label{piecewise} \frac{M_{xB} (z)}{M_s} \sim ...


1

Here's a solution that uses a single dcases environment (provided by the mathtools package) along with a couple of \phantom statements. If you prefer having the fractional terms to the right of the large curly brace typeset using smaller symbols, switch from dcases to cases. \documentclass{article} \usepackage{mathtools} \newlength\mylen ...


3

A variant, with the cases and alignedat environments: \documentclass{article} \usepackag{mathtools} \begin{document} \begin{equation} \dfrac{M_{xB} (z)}{M_s} \sim\begin{cases} \begin{alignedat}{2} & 0, & z & {}< -b_{xB} \\ & 1+\frac{z}{b_{xB}}, &\quad -b_{xB} & <z<0 \\[0.5ex] & 1-\frac{z}{b_{xB}}, ...


2

You can even have wider margins fiddling with the font size and the value of tabcolsep. I took the opportunity to simplify your code and improve the appearance of the table with siunitx and makecell: \documentclass[landscape, 12pt]{report} \usepackage[showframe, nomarginpar, top=0.8in, bottom=1.25in, left=1in, right=1in]{geometry} \usepackage{siunitx} ...


3

A slightly alternate suggestion, based on the conditions of z: \documentclass{article} \usepackage{amsmath} \begin{document} \begin{equation} \frac{M_{xB} (z)}{M_s} \sim \left\{ \begin{array}{ll} 0, & z<-b_{xB} \\ 1+\frac{z}{b_{xB}}, & -b_{xB}<z<0 \\ 1-\frac{z}{b_{xB}}, & 0<z<b_{xB} \\ ...


2

You can dispense with the minipages; it's enough to use a tabular with b (botoom) alignment in which the central column is of paragraph type p{<length>} (thus allowing text wrapping) and not to leave blank lines between the tabular and the legend: The code: \documentclass{beamer} \usepackage[english]{babel} \usepackage[utf8x]{inputenc} ...


1

\multicolumnn can also be used for a single column to overwrite the column specification. The first argument of \cmidrule specifies some trimming. The example uses (lr). Then you will see, the line is also shorter at the right side. Example: \documentclass{article} \usepackage{booktabs} \usepackage{multirow} \begin{document} \begin{table} ...


2

With help of `makecell˙package is really simple: Code: \documentclass{article} \usepackage[T1]{fontenc} \usepackage[utf8]{inputenc} \usepackage{multirow,booktabs,makecell} \renewcommand\theadfont{\normalfont} \begin{document} \begin{table} \begin{tabular}{lrrrr} \toprule \multirow{2}[3]{*}{Method} & \multicolumn{2}{c}{group} ...


0

The package scrlayer-notecolumn can break "note columns" over pages: \documentclass{scrartcl} \usepackage[ngerman]{babel} \usepackage[T1]{fontenc} \usepackage[utf8]{inputenc} \usepackage{scrlayer-scrpage} \usepackage{scrlayer-notecolumn} \usepackage[marginparwidth=5cm,textwidth=10cm,left=2cm]{geometry} \usepackage{lipsum,enumitem,blindtext} ...


0

This may be a visual artefact from a regular list's way of indenting itself. Perhaps creating your own tabularitemize that doesn't use much list formatting suits your needs better: \documentclass{article} \usepackage[margin=1in]{geometry}% Just for this example \usepackage{array,varwidth,booktabs} \newcolumntype{C}{>{\centering\arraybackslash} ...


1

If I simplify your code (remove minipage, instead tabular* use just tabular) and left aesthetic point of view aside, then I obtain: The code is now: \documentclass[12pt]{article} \usepackage{lmodern,caption} \usepackage{array} \usepackage{siunitx} \newcolumntype{C}[1]{>{\centering\arraybackslash} m{#1}} \begin{document} \begin{table} ...


2

the subfigure width argument needs curly braces ie \begin{subfigure}{3.0\textwidth} however i think that seeing as you have only one image the subfigure environment is somewhat redundant. You can just as easily control position, size, caption numbering etc. using just figure and \includegraphics. (the above solution uses subcaption package)


1

If correct understand your question, then the package `ragged2e gives results close to what you looking for: \documentclass[11pt,a4paper]{article} \usepackage{microtype} \usepackage[T1]{fontenc} \usepackage{lmodern} \usepackage[utf8]{inputenc} \usepackage[english]{babel}% option "czech" is not relevant ... ...


5

Use xleftmargin: \documentclass[10pt]{article} \usepackage{minted,lipsum} \begin{document} \lipsum[1] \begin{minted}[xleftmargin=\parindent,linenos,breaklines]{text} Donec vehicula augue eu neque. Pellentesque habitant morbi tristique senectus et netus et malesuada fames ac turpis egestas. Mauris ut leo. Cras viverra metus rhoncus sem. Nulla et lectus ...


2

A. Package microtype Especially if pdfTeX is used in PDF mode (pdflatex), the package adds some flexibility (character protrusion, font expansion). Especially the font expansion is quite useful, because it allows that the letters can be stretched or shrunk a little bit to get better line breaks. The following example shows, that the entry in the second ...


0

I was putting parcolumns and verbatim blocks inside my minipage which was causing problems. I found this rather simple solution quite effective: \noindent\hspace{0.15\linewidth}\begin{minipage}{0.7\linewidth} ... \end{minipage} This creates a smaller minipage and centres with a positive hspace. Using the rule hspace = (1\linewidth - minipage_width) / 2 ...


1

The class tufte-handout provides \justify for justified text: \documentclass[english,nohyper]{tufte-handout} \usepackage{enumitem} \usepackage[english]{babel} \usepackage{blindtext} \begin{document} \marginpar{% \noindent \begin{minipage}{53mm} \vspace{7mm} \underline{Here is the list:} \vspace{0.5mm} \footnotesize \justifying ...


1

Don't consider this an answer, but I wanted to give you something to play with in case you need to do this right now. I unfortunately don't have time to look into it this week, but I might be able to get you started, since I have created custom Beamer themes for my alma mater as well as the corporation I currently work for. I spoke to someone else at ...


3

It will centre if you make it small enough to fit on the page (I added scale=.5 ) and add \centering and \end{document} \documentclass[10pt]{article} \usepackage{pgf,tikz,geometry} \geometry{a4paper} \usepackage{mathrsfs} \usetikzlibrary{arrows} \pagestyle{empty} \begin{document} \centering X\dotfill X \bigskip \definecolor{zzttqq}{rgb}{0.6,0.2,0.} ...


4

You can have what you want with the numberless key. I'm not sure whether you want unnumbered chapters to be in the table of contents; the below code does it, but it's easy to undo it if you don't want. Just use: \titleformat{\chapter}[display] {\normalfont\huge\bfseries\filcenter}{\chaptertitlename\ \thechapter}{20pt}{} ...


0

Or: \documentclass[12pt,tikz,border=2mm]{standalone} \usepackage{amsmath} \begin{document} \begin{gather*} \begin{aligned} x &= x_{0} \\ y &= y_{0} + t \\ z &= z_{0} + x_{0}t \end{aligned} \qquad\text{or}\qquad \begin{aligned} x &= x_{0} + t \\ y &= y_{0} \\ z &= z_{0} + ...


2

Never ever use eqnarray, prefer align from amsmath. See eqnarray vs align for some reasons. \documentclass{article} \usepackage{amsmath} \begin{document} \begin{align*} x &= x_{0} && & x &= x_{0}+t \\ y &= y_{0}+t && \text{or} & y &= y_{0} \\ z &= z_{0}+x_{0}t && & z ...


2

Is that what you want? \documentclass{article} \usepackage{enumitem} \begin{document} Main text with paragraph indent. Now the list. Notice that the list labels aligns with the left margin, the text and paragraphs thereafter with the paragraph indent \begin{enumerate}[wide] \item Bewertung: % \begin{tabular}[t]{l l c } ...


3

Don't use newlines or a paragraph after \item and add the optional [t] argument to the tabular environment (t stands for top alignment) \documentclass{article} \begin{document} \begin{itemize} \item Bewertung: \begin{tabular}[t]{l l c } & TestTest: & Test \\ & TestTestTest: & Test \\ & TestTestTest: & Test \\ & ...


2

I don't understand what happens with numprint. As a workaround, I suggest to achieve the same goal with siunitx, and additionally with booktabs. I would not write the %next to the numbers, as there's one in the column heading: \documentclass{article} \usepackage{array, siunitx, booktabs} \sisetup{table-format=3.0} \begin{document} \begin{tabular}{ ...


4

You should increase the line-spacing by \renewcommand{\arraystretch}{<somefactor>}. % arara: pdflatex \documentclass{article} \usepackage{graphicx} \usepackage{array} \begin{document} \begin{table}[h] \renewcommand{\arraystretch}{1.4} \resizebox{\columnwidth}{!}{% \begin{tabular}{>{$}l<{$}|*{8}{>{$}c<{$}|}} ...


1

With the width of the tabular exceeding 17cm, the margins have to be quite narrow if the material is supposed to fit inside the textblock. In the example below, the margins are set to 1cm. (Aside: rather than setting puny margins, I'd reduce the column widths in the tabular.) \documentclass{article} \usepackage[a4paper,margin=1cm]{geometry} ...


0

The behavior is defined in classicthesis.sty. In most recent versions graffito is just an alias for marginpar. But if you're still using exclusively graffito, you should redefine it, after classicthesis-config.tex has been loaded as \renewcommand{\graffito}[1]{\oldmarginpar% [\graffito@setup\raggedright\hspace{0pt}{#1}]% ...


1

This seems to work, in beamerouterthemedefault.sty. I leave it for others to modify the default theme, as I don't know much about pgfplots: \newbox\secheadsize \defbeamertemplate*{mini frame}{default} {% \setbox\secheadsize=\hbox{\usebeamerfont{section in head/foot}\insertsectionhead} \begin{pgfpicture}{-.25\wd\secheadsize}{0pt}{0.1cm}{0.1cm} ...


2

This could be achieved with a tabular environment: \documentclass[10pt]{report} \begin{document} \begin{center} \textbf{CERTIFICATE} \end{center} This is to certify that... \begin{flushright} \textbf{ \begin{tabular}{l} SUPERVISOR\\ \\ Dr./Er. XXX\\ Professor/Assistant Professor,\\ Department of Computer Engineering,\\ ...


3

In this case, I think the trim left and trim right keys enable you get mostly what you want. They can take a coordinate as their values: \documentclass{beamer} \usepackage{tikz} \usetikzlibrary{positioning} \setbeamertemplate{frametitle}[default][center] \begin{document} \begin{frame}{test} \begin{itemize} \item 1 \item 2 This is very very very ...


2

The key center coordinate defined as \tikzset{ center coordinate/.style={ execute at end picture={ \path ([rotate around={180:#1}]perpendicular cs: horizontal line through={#1}, vertical line through={(current bounding box.east)}) ([rotate around={180:#1}]perpendicular cs: horizontal line ...


2

\documentclass[twocolumn]{article} \usepackage{graphicx} \begin{document} \begin{figure*} \centering \includegraphics[height=3cm]{example-image-a}\quad \includegraphics[height=3cm]{example-image-b}\par\medskip \includegraphics[height=3cm]{example-image-c} \caption{a figure with three subfigures} \end{figure*} \end{document}


1

Maybe something like this? \documentclass{beamer} \usepackage{tikz} \usetikzlibrary{positioning,tikzmark} \setbeamertemplate{frametitle}[default][center] \begin{document} \begin{frame} \frametitle{TEST} \begin{itemize} \item 1 \item 2 \item 3 \item 4 \item 5 This is very very very very very long to illustrate the question \item 6 ...


2

You can set the coordinate of a node to the center of the page. I hope, this is what you wanted. % arara: pdflatex % arara: pdflatex \documentclass{beamer} \usepackage{tikz} \usetikzlibrary{positioning} \setbeamertemplate{frametitle}[default][center] \begin{document} \begin{frame} \frametitle{TEST} \begin{tikzpicture}[remember ...


3

Make the oversized box in a zero width box: \newcommand{\qq}{% \marginpar[% {\makebox[0pt][l]{\hspace*{\largeurtexte}\makebox[0pt][c]{$\oplus$}}}% ]{% \hspace*{-0.5\marginparsep}% \makebox[0pt][c]{$\oplus$}% }% } Here is a simpler version of the macros (I assume that \marginparsep is wider than the \oplus symbol). Less computations, as ...


1

Here's an approach based on the linked answer above. \documentclass{article} \usepackage[margin=0.5in]{geometry} \usepackage{calc} \usepackage{multicol} \newcommand{\abbrlabel}[1]{\makebox[1in][l]{\textbf{#1}\ }} \newenvironment{abbreviations}{\begin{list}{}{\raggedright\renewcommand{\makelabel}{\abbrlabel}% ...


7

With amsmath there is the aligned environment you can use inside other building blocks; it inserts a tiny space before it which may be undone with \!. If you use the combination of split inside equation instead one align, then only one equation number is attached and you avoid writing \notag many times. By default the number is centered, but the tbtags ...


3

You can use the \phantom command \documentclass{article} \usepackage{multicol,amsmath,amssymb,geometry} \begin{document} \begin{multicols}{2} \begin{align} P(&\mathcal{X},\mathcal{C},\xi|\alpha,\beta,\theta^0) \notag\\ &= \prod_d P(\mathcal{X}_d|\beta)P(\mathcal{C}_d|\alpha,\xi) \prod_c P(\xi^c|\theta^0) \notag\\ &\propto\prod_d \beta^d_c ...


3

Andrew Swann’s answer is clearly superior; but after all, in the end I decided to leave my poor attempt (I had previously deleted it) for the purpose of documenting how the correct spacing could be obtained by combining the \! mentioned by A.S. with the \; called for by a (nonscript) \mathrel: \documentclass[a4paper]{article} \usepackage[T1]{fontenc} ...


1

In ConTeXt it's relatively easy with protrusion=pure: \definefontfeature[default][default][protrusion=pure] \setupalign[hanging] \starttext \input tufte \stoptext


3

I dislike the idea of having the dashes in the margin, but you could do so by increasing the protrusion factor of microtype. This will also push other stuff like periods and the little hook of the "t" into the margin, but this would just be consistent. Have a look, if this is what you want: % arara: pdflatex \documentclass{article} ...


3

Rather than use a minipage and have to guess the width, usually better to use a tabular and allow each box to be its natural width, so you can left align the text in the box but set the box flush right. \documentclass{article} \usepackage[top=1in, bottom=1in, left=1in, right=1in]{geometry} \usepackage{graphicx} \usepackage{url} \begin{document} ...


2

Just use an \hfill to force space between the minipages \documentclass{article} \usepackage[top=1in, bottom=1in, left=1in, right=1in]{geometry} \usepackage{graphicx} \usepackage{url} \begin{document} \begin{titlepage} \begin{center} \textsc{\LARGE University of Blah} \\ \vspace{1cm} \textsc{\Large School of Egg Decoration} \\ ...


2

I don't know about the res.cls and I am unsure whether the tabular way is the best way to do this, but if tabular is used, one has to kill the additional column spacing left and right of a column specifier: \begin{tabular}{@{}ll} will remove the extra space of 6pt (standard value of \tabcolsep) for the tabulars. This must be done in the outer as well in ...


3

If you want to leave alignment to LaTeX rather than spacing manually in verbatim, you can do something like this with tabular (or longtable if the dictionary is long): \documentclass{article} \begin{document} \begin{tabular}{l@{~=~}l} Name & FirstName + (Initial) + LastName\\ FirstName & 1\{Character\}32\\ Initial & Character\\ LastName & ...


3

When you have the dictionaries already lined up as in your example, an easy way is to use a verbatim environment. \documentclass{article} \begin{document} \begin{verbatim} Name = FirstName + (Initial) + LastName FirstName = 1{Character}32 Initial = Character LastName = 1{Character} Character = [ A-Z | a-z | 0-9 | ' | - ] \end{verbatim} ...


1

Building on Gustavo Mezzetti's answer, the image can be placed in a figure environment so it can be captioned and listed in the \listoffigures. A few other modifications are required, shown below. The \paperheight adjustment (-6cm) needs to be manually tuned depending on the aspect ratio of your image. This is best done by eye anyway, as an automatic ...


1

I am not completely sure of what you want to achieve and what limitations you have got, but, to begin with, you might want to have a look at the following code: \documentclass[a4paper]{report} \usepackage[T1]{fontenc} \usepackage{geometry} \usepackage{pdflscape} \usepackage{mwe} % for sample figures -- automatically loads graphicx \begin{document} ...



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