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8

That is the correct variable to play with. It is allow lines to be up to 8% shorter than standard. Try reducing it via e.g. \setlength{\RaggedRightRightskip}{0pt plus 0.02\hsize} for a percentage (here 2%) of the line length or \setlength{\RaggedRightskip}{0pt plus 1em} for an absolute possible shortfall. For the tufte classes this change needs to ...


7

The "raggedness" of \RaggedRight can be configured by length \RaggedRightRightskip, which is inserted at the right end of a line, when TeX breaks the paragraph. The default is 0pt plus 2em, which means the line can be full or short with upto 2em white space at the right side. Increasing the value to 2.8em reduces the number of hyphenations to one at the ...


7

The Computer Modern fonts define no kerning between the hyphen and uppercase letters, so if you want it you have to insert your own: \documentclass{article} \newcommand{\?}[1]{\kern-.#1em } \begin{document} Hasse-Weil Hasse-\?{02}Weil Hasse-\?{04}Weil Hasse-\?{06}Weil Hasse-\?{08}Weil Hasse-\?{10}Weil Hasse-\?{12}Weil Hasse-\?{14}Weil ...


7

\centering does not suppress hyphenation but the penalties and glue are such that it will (almost) always be the case that there is a lower penalty for having a shorter line. The ragged2e package has \Centering which is less flexible at the margins, so more likely to choose hyphenation, \documentclass[12pt, oneside]{article} \usepackage{lipsum,ragged2e} ...


6

Some words about line breaking. TeX assigns a badness to each line, based on the amount of stretching of the glue in it. In a ragged right setting, there's only stretchable glue at the right (\rightskip), which has the consequence that this glue (if finite) will usually stretch more than stated. The default for \RaggedRight has an the “optimal” stretching of ...


5

You could use a command called (say) \dotdash defined by \def\dotdash{\nobreak\hspace{0pt}.--}


3

To prevent hyphenation of words before their respective fourth letter, say, just insert the instruction \lefthyphenmin4 (For English-language documents, one usually works with \lefthyphenmin2 and \righthyphenmin3.)


3

Edit: \flushleft changes the line breaking to ragged right without hyphenation. Remove it if you want a text with justified margins. If your text is supposed to be ragged right you can get hyphenation from the ragged2e-package. \centering has to be used inside brackets to limit its scope. You can avoid the problem altogether if you use \maketitle for you ...


2

Here is some full example which loads hyphenation patterns for requested languages and can detect used language from characters unicode values. Simple Lua library languages.lua is used: kpse.set_program_name "luatex" local M = {} local languages = require "language.dat" M.languages = languages local ranges = {default = "english"} local function ...


2

TeX's hyphenation rules do not work on the basis of words, except for special exceptions specified in \hyphenation. The body of the hyphenation rules are generated by matching substrings of words in the document to a set of letter patterns that encourage or discourage hyphenation at that point. So there is no sense really in which TeX does not "know" a word ...


2

You can hide the width of the hyphen, but i am not sure it looks much better. \documentclass[8pt, marklength=20mm, coverwidth=162mm, coverheight=229mm, bleedwidth=30mm,spinewidth=65mm]{bookcover} \usepackage[icelandic, latin, czech]{babel} \usepackage[utf8]{inputenc} \usepackage[T1]{fontenc} \usepackage{tgpagella} % ...


2

You have two possibilities: declare to be using the fake language hyphenation rules nohyphenation set \hyphenpenalty to 10000, which disallows hyphenation except at explicit hyphens In the code below I changed the font for the Chinese part; adding a definition for \languageshorthands is needed only if you follow method 1. Once you have decided for a ...


2

use the url package and \path|FRQ.DATA.LOG.OUT.PRINT.1| and it will allow breaking at . You could define a command with a different name if needed, see the url package documentation. Adding this to your example from the linked question, and setting up @ as a safer way to input # gives \documentclass[a4paper]{scrartcl} ...


1

As @Johannes_B pointed out, the issue is with the hyphenation. Possible workarounds involve \raggedright (see No hyphens in biblatex) or \sloppy (see Hyphenation in bibliography with Biblatex). With \appto{\bibsetup}{\raggedright}: With \appto{\bibsetup}{\sloppy}:


1

By default, LaTeX doesn't hyphenate typewriter type text. With fontspec you can revert this decision quite easily, but you have to newly define a monospaced font. \documentclass{scrartcl} \usepackage{fontspec} \usepackage{polyglossia} \setdefaultlanguage[spelling=new]{german} \setmonofont{Latin Modern Mono}[HyphenChar={-}] \usepackage{tabu} ...


1

The caption styles are describe on section 10.5, page 183 in Memoir manual. It enable powerful formatting of caption appearance. I use the following (quite nonstandard) caption style: \captiondelim{\null\newline} \captionnamefont{\small\sffamily\bfseries} \captiontitlefont{\small\sffamily\linespread{.84}\selectfont} \captionstyle[\raggedright]{} ...



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