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11

If you use this font, fontspec will tell you in the log-file: Could not resolve font Sanskrit 2003/B (it probably doesn't exist). This means that the font has no bold (/B) version. You can use the AutoFakeBold key to get a faked bold: \documentclass{article} \usepackage{fontspec} \setmainfont[Script=Devanagari,AutoFakeBold=3.5]{Sanskrit 2003} ...


10

Well example 1 makes quite a great effort (with all this mapping directives) to enable a romanized input. If you don't want this ignore all this code and simply start writing e.g. use something like this \documentclass{article} \usepackage{fontspec} \setmainfont[Script=Devanagari]{your font} \begin{document} \section{संस्कृतम्} जीवनस्य लक्ष्यमेव संस्कृतस्य ...


8

There's currently no interface for changing all numerals to Devanagari ones. However you can define your own: \documentclass{article} \usepackage{fontspec} \usepackage{polyglossia} \setdefaultlanguage{hindi} \setotherlanguage{english} \setmainfont[Script=Devanagari]{Nakula} \newcommand{\devanagarinumeral}[1]{% \devanagaridigits{\number\csname ...


8

The ucharclasses package makes this possible. \documentclass{article} \usepackage{fontspec} \usepackage{polyglossia} \usepackage[Latin,Devanagari]{ucharclasses} \setmainfont{Devanagari MT} % Maybe Sanskrit 2003 doesn't need the following line; % in this case change \devanagarifont in the \setTransitions % commands to \normalfont ...


7

As long as you have the appropriate fonts, you should be able to use XeLaTeX and the polyglossia package. Assuming that you have fonts that support Tamil already installed on your system (i.e., available to non-TeX applications like Open Office) XeLaTeX should find them automatically. % !TEX TS-program = XeLaTeX \documentclass{article} ...


6

Use fontspec and polyglossia: \documentclass{article} % The fontspec package provides a nice interface to font loading. \usepackage{fontspec} % standard packages for XeLaTeX \usepackage{xunicode} \usepackage{xltxtra} % The polyglossia package lets us easily use several languages. \usepackage{polyglossia} % Define the used fonts. Replace Nakula and XITS ...


5

This is what I get compiling the following file with XeLaTeX: \documentclass{article} \usepackage{fontspec} \setmainfont{Pothana2000} \usepackage{polyglossia} \setmainlanguage{telugu} \begin{document} చేయి అనగా మానవులు, చింపాంజీలు, కోతులు మరియు లెమూర్లకు గల శరీరభాగమునకు వేళ్లు కలబాహ్యంగము. కోలా చేతికి ఎదురెదురుగా వున్న రెండు బొటనవ్రేళ్లు వుంటాయి కాబట్టి ...


5

Just to update, devanagari now works beautifully in recent betas. There was a bug in how the opentype features were handled, but it has been squashed. To use devanagari, simply define a font with the devanagari-one feature set: \definefont [Deva][file:chandas.ttf*devanagari-one] \starttext \Deva श्रेयो हि ज्ञानमभ्यासाज्ज्ञानाद्ध्यानं विशिष्यते । \crlf ...


4

You have used \Large in \section[\texorpdfstring{\Large प्रथमोऽध्यायः}{Chapter 1}]{प्रथमोऽध्यायः} The optional argument is used for running headings. If you remove \Large, the problem is solved. Similarly in \renewcommand{\thesubsection}{\small{\devanagarinumeral{section}.\devanagarinumeral{subsection}}} \renewcommand{\thepage}{\Large ...


4

Thank you for changing the font and adding the parbox. All the paragraph entries are single line LaTeX does not by default stretch the last line of a paragraph it allows it to be short as is the norm in European languages. If I set \parfillskip to 0 then even the last line is stretched. I am sorry, but as I can not read the script I can't say if the ...


4

you need an OpenType or TrueType font which supprts that language, eg Code2000. Then the following works: \documentclass{article} \usepackage{fontspec} \setmainfont{Code2000} \begin{document} తెలుగు \end{document} You have to run the example with xelatex or alternatively with lualatex; both are installed with every TeX distribution. Code2000 is ...


4

It is easy on Linux :) Download the file http://mirrors.ctan.org/language/devanagari/velthuis/bin/devnag.c Say from the command line gcc -o devnag devnag.c Optionally install the file into /usr/local/bin: sudo install devnag /usr/local/bin


3

Well, it is said that you can choose XeLaTeX in ScribTeX. I think you don't need worry about that. If there is no font installed in ScribTeX's Linux system, you can try devanagari package in pdfLaTeX. I don't know Devanagari at all, but you can try. The package doesn't use Unicode for pdfTeX, and needs a preprocess. Thus you may need to download the ...


3

Save the test file as test.dn and run on it the devnag program: devnag test.dn This will produce a test.tex file \def\DevnagVersion{2.15}\documentclass {article} \usepackage{devanagari} \begin{document} {\dn \7{g}no\381w\qq{r} aEn \3FEwm\qq{n}} \end{document} that you can run pdflatex on getting what I assume is correct output (but I don't read ...


3

You can define \thepage so it is safe to use in contents and headers directly: \documentclass[14pt]{article} \usepackage{fontspec} \usepackage{lipsum} \setmainfont[Script=Devanagari]{Arial Unicode MS} \usepackage{fancyhdr} \usepackage{xstring} \renewcommand\thepage{\Devnag{page}} ...


3

Since fontspec is being loaded, you need to process the example with xelatex; however, the original code won't work as expected (using xelatex) and will produce the error message ) Runaway argument? \q_stop \exp_args:NNo \group_end: \iow_term:n \l__iow_wrap_tl \iow_term:n \ETC. ! File ended while scanning use of \__iow_wrap_loop:w. <inserted text> ...


3

You can use any ttf font in TeX using xetex. First you download and install any gujarathi font (for example -- Saumil_guj2, here you will find instructions on how to type those fonts also, check the bottom of the page). Then write a tex file like this. \documentclass[11pt]{article} \usepackage{ifxetex} \ifxetex \usepackage{fontspec} ...


3

I'm not sure that "Do others get the same output" is a question for StackExchange -- rather it is for the XeTeX mailing list, but anyhow, I just compiled your tex file using XeLaTeX from the TeXLive 2012.20120611-3~ubuntu12.04.1 package from the PPA on Kubuntu Precise and I get the correct rendering as you can see:


2

Like Aditya says, at the moment only MkII supports Indic scripts out of the box. (At least, I assume he is correct — I do not know anything about TeX + Indic scripts myself.) If using LuaTeX instead of XeTeX is important to you, you might want to get in touch with the typesetting company TAT Zetwerk. I happen to know from their presentation at EuroTeX 2012 ...


2

You should try adding \hyphenrules{nohyphenation} after \begin{sloppy}, which should inhibit hyphenation except where explicitly allowed with \-.


2

I was able to typeset Tamil using LaTeX on Ubuntu by installing the itrans and itrans-fonts packages via synaptic (or apt-get). It doesn't let you type in Tamil directly, rather you have to key in the ASCII transcription, then process it with itrans from the command prompt, then run (pdf)latex on the resultant file. Say I have the following file ...


2

You can create your own numbering style as follows: \newcommand*\devanagari[1]{\expandafter\@devanagari\csname c@#1\endcsname} \newcommand*\@devanagari[1]{% \ifcase#1\or १\or २\or ३\or ४\or ५\or ६\or ७\or ८\or ९\fi} Since this code uses the @ character in commands, you need to put \makeatletter before this code if it’s not in a package file. And it’s ...


2

A better and easier solution is to use the package polyglossia: \usepackage{polyglossia} \setdefaultlanguage{hindi} This should be enough to switch on Devanāgarī numerals. (Is Hindi the correct language? I’m guessing here. According to the documentation of polyglossia it has the correct numerals, at least.)


2

You could use Charles Wikner's Sanskrit package, available from CTAN. With this package, you would enter transliterated text and it would be converted into Devanagari (it does ligatures properly if I remember correctly). The documentation is in the file sktdoc.ps. edit: if you use Debian or Ubuntu, the same package is available with the name ...


2

In order to transform input such as {\dn brahma.nyaadaaya karmaa.ni sa.nga.m tyaktvaa karoti ya.h | \\\ lipyate na sa paapena padmapatramivaambhasa} into Devanagari, the document containing that code must be preprocessed with the devnag program and the result can then be fed to LaTeX. There is no similar preprocessor for turning that code into a Latin ...


2

This thread from TUGIndia Mailing list should help you in the right direction. And, here are a couple of references from a Google search: See this this package on CTAN. There's also this initiative by Government of India, funded by CTAN, working on Malayalam fonts; linked is the homepage for the project. Typesetting Indic languages is still undergoing ...


1

For Hindi, you can probably use the devanagari package for LaTeX. I've used it for Sanskrit. Just note that the "internal" codes for the script is a bit obtuse, so it is suggested that you follow the documentation and type in a more readable format, and then pass the source file through a preprocessor. (Included in the distribution.) There are also language ...


1

For my Ubuntu system I did as Lian Tze Lim suggested. Use the package manager to install the itrans and itrans-fonts packages. No muss No fuss. For Windows and MiKTex 2.9 the set up process was more involved. Below is the batch file I created to facilitate the copying. 1) Install MiKTeX 2) Use the MiKTeX package manager to install the indic-type1 ...


1

The \RedLine defined in that answer is just an example. In order to get a red line using the current font it's only a matter of saying \newcommand{\RedLine}[1]{\textcolor{red}{#1}} In order to use different fonts, you can define them via \newfontfamily: \usepackage{fontspec} \setmainfont{Sanskrit 2003} \newfontfamily\Aksharyogini{Aksharyogini} ...



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