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@Johannes_B, @Sigur, @ArashEsbati, @cfr, thank you all; I installed windows update yesterday I think it is the one called Security update for windows vista x64-based systems KB3059317 ( I am not sure the second update window malicious object removal tool x86 KB890830 is for anything like that ) and now I am like anyone of you with TeXLive on his laptop. ...


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I don't own the fonts, so this might be wild guess. But in general, you should have received a zip(?) file and you have to extract the files into your texmf-local directory. You can locate your texmf-local directory at command prompt with: kpsewhich -var-value=TEXMFLOCAL The general directory layout of files to extract to is shown below: ...


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Since June 2015, xindy is available for installation in miktex package manager. See version 5653 of the package repository. Don't forget to update database.


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Follow ONLY steps 1-4 from the linked instructions. Steps 5-6 and 8 are simply wrong. Step 9 is pointless and step 7 is inefficient. Instead, after completing step 4, do this: ./scripts/install $(kpsewhich -var TEXMFLOCAL) mkdir -p --parents $(kpsewhich -var TEXMFLOCAL)/web2c echo Map MinionPro.map >> $(kpsewhich -var TEXMFLOCAL)/web2c/updmap.cfg ...


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You have to compile the .ins in your favorite LaTeX editor


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Mac OS X El Capitan is not for public consumption This is a beta release, and not public at this point (i.e., you likely signed an NDA to get it) All features are subject to change, and mucking around in nvram is inadvisable unless you really know what you're doing A corollary to my second point: if you know what you're doing, you should ask on Apple's ...


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The new Mac OS comes with a feature named "rootless" that disallows modification of important system files, even by the root user. However, LaTeX installation requires access to the /usr/texbin folder, at least as an alias, and it is protected by Mac OS. There are two solutions: 1) Disable the rootless feature To disable the rootless feature at boot, ...


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Regarding the theoretical question: in miktex it can be done with the package manager (either the user or the admin version depending on how you did install the package), in a current texlive with tlmgr. But normally it should not be necessary so you should really check what's going on. –


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The quickest way to check if a package is installed is to search for it with kpsewhich {package-name}.sty. So, to check for etoolbox, use $ kpsewhich etoolbox.sty /usr/local/texlive/2014/texmf-dist/tex/latex/etoolbox/etoolbox.sty If it finds the package, it will output the path (just like normal which). If it doesn't find the package, it will output ...



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