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1

As indicated by my comment, one can start with my answer at Upright Greek font fitting to Computer Modern. However, here, I extend that to take into account the current math style, and also to show how the process can be automated by redefining the greek letters. \documentclass[a4paper]{article} \usepackage{mathptmx,pslatex,scalerel} \newsavebox{\foobox} ...


1

If one did not prefer T1 encoding, and was using pdflatex, the other option is to use Bruno's \slantbox (Shear transform a "box"). \documentclass{article} \newsavebox\foobox \newcommand{\slantbox}[2][.2]{\mbox{% \sbox{\foobox}{#2}% \hskip\wd\foobox \pdfsave \pdfsetmatrix{1 0 #1 1}% \llap{\usebox{\foobox}}% ...


7

Use the T1 rather than OT1 font encoding: \documentclass{article} \usepackage[T1]{fontenc} \begin{document} \S 1 \textit{\S 1} \end{document} In this case, the symbol is taken from the same font as is used for regular text (whatever the current font is - upright, italic, whatever) rather than from a distinct symbol font. This is because T1, unlike OT1, ...


16

The commands \rm, \bf etc are called "deprecated" because they have been removed from the latex kernel. The way the commands work don't fit in the (much better) "new font selection scheme" (nfss) used by latex2e. A number of classes nevertheless provide the definitions for these commands, but the definitions differ. E.g. memoir: \@memoldfonterr {\rm ...


19

Is there any reason(s) not to use \let to redefine \bf to \bfseries and \it to \itshape? Yes, there are good reasons. :-) With the above \let-based setup, {\bf\it ...} produces bold-italic. In contrast, in a plain-TeX document {\bf\it ...} produces italic text. If the goal is to make \bf and \it behave the same way in LaTeX and plain-TeX, the \let-based ...


1

You could just stop the command, then restart it. \documentclass[11pt]{article} \begin{document} \textit{Here is some itallic text,} some regular text, \textit{and more itallic text.} \end{document} Would produce



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