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2

Remove the trick fontspec does for respecting \itshape when \scshape is executed. \documentclass[a4paper, 12pt]{article} \usepackage{amsmath} \usepackage{fontspec} \usepackage[cmbraces]{newtxmath} \usepackage{ebgaramond-maths} \usepackage{polyglossia} \usepackage{mathrsfs} \setmainfont{EB Garamond} \setmonofont{CMU Typewriter Text} \setmainlanguage{french}...


2

Well now, if I wanted something quite as ugly as this (and I accept my taste is probably different from yours), here's how I'd do it. The secret sauce you're looking for is, I think \textup (for "upright"): \documentclass[12pt]{article} \usepackage{ebgaramond} \newcommand{\textscup}[1]{\textsc{\textup{#1}}} \begin{document} \emph{Lorem \textsc{ipsum} dolor}...


0

Well, adding your shown code into the file example.tex of current class moderncv (version 2.0.0) I have no problem seeing the italic words with your mentioned style banking (in an comment) ... Because you gave us no other informations I can only guess you are using an older version of class moderncv or an outdated TeX distribution with an included outdated ...


5

This has to do with the redefinition of \em performed by fontspec, which doesn't take into account the context, but only nesting of \em inside \em. The following workaround should work: \documentclass{article} \usepackage{fontspec} \usepackage{polyglossia} \usepackage{mathtools, amsthm} \usepackage{unicode-math} \setdefaultlanguage{english} \...


3

Opinion based answer: For variables that have human readable names or are acronyms (somehow), I would prefer \text or a \DeclareMathOperator approach (or \mathit and \mathrm, depending on personal taste) If the symbols are used more than once, markup macros are a better way \documentclass{article} \usepackage{mathtools} \DeclareMathOperator{\pdf}{pdf} \...



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