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1

In the technical sense of the word, this is an answer, but it's not acceptable because there is bound to be a more elegant solution. It is at best an example of the desired effect. \documentclass[12pt]{report} \usepackage[sort]{natbib} \usepackage{polyglossia} \usepackage{bidi} \setdefaultlanguage{hebrew} \setotherlanguage{english} \addto\captionsenglish{ ...


2

Put this in the magyar.lbx file: \DeclareBibliographyStrings{% % ... url = {{Elérhető}{Elérhető}}, urlfrom = {{elérhető}{elérhető}}, urlseen = {{elérés dátuma}{elérés dátuma}}, } \DeclareBibliographyExtras{ % ... \protected\def\mkbibordinal#1{\stripzeros{#1}\adddot}% \protected\def\mkbibdatelong#1#2#3{% ...


1

Unfortunately, bibaltex-ieee uses a slightly un-biblatex-y way to format the output of the number and volume field. While normally this formatting is done via \DeclareFieldFormat[article,periodical]{number}{#1} in biblatex-ieee this is all done in a macro \renewbibmacro*{volume+number+eid}{% \iffieldundef{volume} {} {% ...


1

Here's something you can play with: \documentclass[12pt]{article} \usepackage[T1]{fontenc} \usepackage[utf8]{inputenc} \usepackage[paperwidth=9cm, paperheight=10cm, showframe]{geometry} \parindent 0pt% %\usepackage[american, british]{babel} %\usepackage{datetime} \def\germtoday{% Example format: Date Month Year \number\day\space \ifcase\month\or Januar% ...


3

For dictionaries, I use dici.sty. Is is a very small package... It creates the usual dictionary headers, and tries to define as less as possible commands. example: \documentclass[twoside,twocolumn]{book} \usepackage[utf8]{inputenc} \usepackage{dici} \begin{document} \title{The dictionary of ... \author{Jose Joao Almeida \and ... \maketitle ...


5

You can use the testhyphens package. \documentclass{article} \usepackage[british,welsh]{babel} \usepackage{testhyphens} \begin{document} \begin{checkhyphens}{} un casgliad credadwy traddodiadau athroniaeth mathemateg canolfan hapusrwydd blwyddyn deuddeg llongyfarchiadau cyfeiriadau \end{checkhyphens} \selectlanguage{british} \begin{checkhyphens}{} un ...


4

here's an adaptation of your file that will generate the hyphenations you seek: \documentclass[welsh]{article} \usepackage{babel} \begin{document} \showhyphens{un casgliad credadwy traddodiadau athroniaeth} \showhyphens{mathemateg canolfan hapusrwydd blwyddyn} \showhyphens{deuddeg llongyfarchiadau cyfeiriadau} \end{document} just process this with ...


3

Assuming you are using a plain-like format with the babel hyphenation patterns available (so say pdftex or xetex) you can switch to the correct hyphenation using the fact that \lang@<name> is the language number. Thus \language\csname lang@welsh\endcsname \showhyphens{un casgliad credadwy traddodiadau athroniaeth mathemateg canolfan hapusrwydd ...


3

It looks like surrounding the English text in the xepersian package's latin environment is the solution. Disclaimer: I don't know this language, but I copied the text below from the first page of the xepersian documentation. I used the Nazli font because it is freely available through my Debian distribution. \documentclass{article} \usepackage{xepersian} ...


4

Judging from the output, I guess you use xelatex file.tex, then makeindex file.idx, and finally xelatex file.tex again. This won’t work, as makeindex isn’t so language-aware. You can use xindy (xindy) for the middle step instead, with the support for Persian being provided by xindy-persian. The easiest way would be downloading xindy-persian to the ...


1

One solution is to use XeTeX (or similar), which allows direct use of unicode and system fonts. The example below uses Times New Roman for the main font, and specifies two others for the Chinese and Hebrew (WenQuanYi Micro Hei and Cardo, respectively). You can change the fonts to the appropriate type faces on your system. Unfortunately, I have stopped using ...


3

Localize the change to within the floating environment while also specifying the change to \tablename: \documentclass{article} \usepackage[english,frenchb]{babel} \addto\captionsfrench{\def\tablename{Tableau}} \usepackage{fontspec} \begin{document} \begin{table}[!h] \selectlanguage{french} \caption{First} \end{table} \begin{table}[!h] ...


3

It's not working because you're using the wrong syntax: \citep[Prefix][Postfix]{key} \citet[Prefix][Postfix]{key} (don't use \cite, although it's the same as \citep). If you just want a prefix, use an empty second optional argument: \citep[Prefix][]{key} \citet[Prefix][]{key} Just one optional argument will use it as postfix: \citep[Postfix]{key} ...


6

Gəʿəz can be beautifully typeset using XeLaTeX (xelatex) and fontspec (fontspec), which support all kinds of complex scripts and advanced font abilities. As far as I know, this should be possible in a very similar way with LuaLaTeX (lualatex) and fontspec, but I’m not familiar with Lua(La)TeX. Here is an example; it uses free (OFL) fonts — Abyssinica SIL ...


2

Make the following two changes to your code: Use the instruction \usepackage[natbibapa]{apacite} to load the natbib package in a way that maintains compatibility with apacite. (For more on this, see p. 7 of the user guide of the apacite package.) Using this loading method has the added benefit that natbib is loaded automatically with the option ...



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