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Load T1 before OT1, undeclare \l as an OT1 command and declare its default to be T1: \documentclass{article} \usepackage[T1,OT1]{fontenc} \usepackage{libertine} \UndeclareTextCommand{\l}{OT1} \DeclareTextSymbolDefault{\l}{T1} \title{This is Quantifiably finally ligatured text} \begin{document} \maketitle I need the character \l{} too though. ...


3

Another method, by redeclaring \l to be in T1 font encoding: \documentclass{article} \usepackage[OT1]{fontenc} \usepackage{libertine} \let\oldl\l \renewcommand{\l}{\begingroup\fontencoding{T1}\selectfont\oldl\endgroup} \title{This is Quantifiably finally ligatured text} \begin{document} \maketitle I need the character \l{} too though. \end{document} ...


2

You could disable the dreaded Th ligature in OT1 fonts by loading microtype and issuing \DisableLigatures[T]{encoding=OT1} but this has the drawback that also kerning against T is disabled, as the following example shows. \documentclass[paper=a5,pagesize,fontsize=13pt]{scrbook} \usepackage{showframe} \usepackage[T1]{fontenc} \usepackage[osf]{libertine} ...


4

The difference is due to OT1: .\OT1/LinuxLibertineT-TOsF/m/n/13 i .\OT1/LinuxLibertineT-TOsF/m/n/13 n .\OT1/LinuxLibertineT-TOsF/m/n/13 g .\OT1/LinuxLibertineT-TOsF/m/n/13 . .\glue 3.7921 plus 4.875 minus 0.36096 .\OT1/LinuxLibertineT-TOsF/m/n/13 (ligature Th) .\OT1/LinuxLibertineT-TOsF/m/n/13 i .\OT1/LinuxLibertineT-TOsF/m/n/13 s .\glue 3.25 plus 1.625 ...



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