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0

Try the package setspace. \documentclass{article} \usepackage{setspace} \begin{document} text\\at\\normal\\spacing \begin{spacing}{.8} apple\\orange\\cat\\imperial green tea\\left-handed president \end{spacing} text\\at\\normal\\spacing \end{document} Changing the .8 to 1 gives single-spaced lines, 2 gives double-spaced lines, etc.


4

If this is for a journal paper submission, don't worry about it. The editors will sort out the placement of the contents to fit within their templates. However, if you want to do this for your own usage, there are a number of options. Easiest is to include the float package and use the [H] float placement specifier \documentclass{article} ...


3

This may not be exactly what you want, but try putting a blank line before the \doublespacing command. \documentclass[a4paper,12pt]{report} \usepackage[ngerman]{babel} \usepackage[T1]{fontenc} \usepackage[ansinew,latin1]{inputenc} \usepackage{setspace} \onehalfspacing \begin{document} Lorem ipsum dolor sit amet, consectetur adipiscing elit. ...


2

tabularx affects the setting of multiline cells, and the only column for which you had more than one line you were not using X. Also I removed some packages to make your example more minimal (they generate missing font errors as posted for me) This just used X and removes pbox: %%%%%%%%%%%%%%%%%%%%%%%%%%%%%%%%%%%%%%%%%%%%%%%%%%% %% (UTF-8/XeLaTex) ...


3

Don't use \pbox. \documentclass[12pt,a4paper,oneside,openany]{book} \usepackage{fontspec,tabularx,amsmath} % For multiletter symbols \DeclareMathOperator\Real{Re} % cf plain TeX's \Re and Reynolds number \DeclareMathOperator\imag{Im} % cf plain TeX's \Im \newcommand{\constant}[1]{\mathit{#1}} \newcommand\Rey{\constant{Re}} % Reynolds number ...


1

REVISED SOLUTION to eliminate use of \pbox. Here, I replaced your use of the \pbox with a \stackanchor, with extra vertical separation provided by way of \addstackgap. I wrapped it all up in a newly defined macro \mystack{}{}. In that definition, the [3pt] and [6pt] vertical gap specifiers may be changed to suit. \documentclass[12pt,a4paper]{book} ...


2

Just wanted to add to the answer of @Tahtisilma that you can also use \hyphenation{wo-rd, w-ord} to manually set hyphenation patterns for specific words in you document. Also, \phantom{word} will act as if "word" was printed, except that it isn't. Great little trick for last-ditch fine-tuning of spacing where \hspace{} doesn't work (note: not in this ...


9

It is better to use an enumerate list to do what you're doing. If you want to reproduce exactly the same output, load enumitem and use the following settings leftmargin=0pt,align=left,labelsep=10pt,itemindent=*,label={\bfseries\alph*.} MWE: \documentclass[a4 paper,11pt]{article} \usepackage{amsmath, amsfonts, amssymb, parskip, dsfont, amsthm, wasysym, ...


5

LaTeX is hyphenating. The problem is that you provide LaTeX with space at the start of enumerate, that can stretch (the default space). Delete the spaces at the beginning and the problem goes away. By the way if LaTeX does not know the word or you want different breaks you can use \- e.g., ans\-wer. \documentclass[a4 paper,11pt]{article} ...


5

Just using the enumitem package seems to solve the issues: Without using an enumerate type of environment, you can use an \mbox to ensure that you get consistent spacing -- although I would not recommend this: Code: \enumitem \documentclass[a4 paper,11pt]{article} \usepackage{amsmath, amsfonts, amssymb, parskip, dsfont, amsthm, wasysym, mathrsfs} ...


5

The left frame is drawn by pieces of rules as high as a strut, but with \baselinestretch set to 0.8 some characters are higher than a strut. You could solve by changing the way the rules are computed, for instance with \documentclass{article} \usepackage{listings} \usepackage{setspace} \lstset{basicstyle=\footnotesize\ttfamily\selectfont, ...


3

sectsty only updates only the sectional unit font-related setting but still use the traditional \@startsection construction: \renewcommand\section{\@startsection {section}{1}{\z@}% {-3.5ex \@plus -1ex \@minus -.2ex}% {2.3ex \@plus.2ex}% % {\normalfont\Large\bfseries}} {\normalfont\Large\bfseries\SS@sectfont}} ...


0

I finally solved this using the package setspace, and wrapping my TOC in a spacing environment as follows: \usepackage{setspace} \begin{spacing}{1.8} \tableofcontents \end{spacing} For line spacing of, for example, 1.8.



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