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1

With a possibly handy syntax: the avs environment takes as optional argument the column specifier for the second column (default l); it should contain one or more \avsline commands; the optional argument is meant to specify a color. Some auxiliary macros are defined for easing specification of symbols. \documentclass{article} ...


0

\documentclass{article} \usepackage{array} \newcolumntype{I}{!{:}} \begin{document} \begin{equation} \left[\begin{tabular}{lIl} PLACE & dental \\ PLACE & dental \\ MANNER & fricative \\ VOICE & + \\ \end{tabular}\right] \quad \left[\begin{tabular}{lIl} PLACE & dental \\ PLACE & uvular \\ VOICE & + \\ \end{tabular}\right] ...


0

Use the package amsmath and try this: \begin{equation} \left[ \begin{array}{lcl} \mathrm{PLACE} &:& \mathrm{dental}\\ \mathrm{PLACE} &:& \mathrm{dental}\\ \mathrm{MANNER} &:& \mathrm{fricative}\\ \mathrm{VOICE} &:& + \end{array}\right] \qquad \left[\begin{array}{lcl} \mathrm{PLACE} &:&\mathrm{dental}\\ ...


3

Unicode's advantages As I see it, there are many advantages to using a Unicode font with XeLaTeX/LuaLaTeX, some of which are mentioned in answers to the above questions and in other places, notably Alan Munn's answers to How to use phonetic IPA characters in LaTeX and Preparing a text for conversion to LaTeX: How to convert "ejective stops" in ...


1

The following code correctly sets the proportions of the top, right, and bottom of the quadrilateral to be 4:3:2 and gives two examples of how to place vowels using xy coordinates. \documentclass{article} \usepackage{tikz} \usetikzlibrary{calc} \begin{document} \begin{tikzpicture}[vowel/.style={fill, circle, inner sep=0pt, text height=1.25ex}] ...


5

Actually, you were definitely on the right track: some minor additions to your code work nicely. This builds on the fact that tikz-qtree.sty can use \nodes, which can be named and the names used as coordinates for \drawing. The second example is a little more complex in that a line is drawn between two trees, requiring \begin{scope}...\end{scope} for the two ...


3

You can achieve what you want in pst-asr, and if you use XeTeX you go fine (which is anyway recommended for linguistics). I'm not In front of my computer now, so code and output later! EDIT Here is the code. \documentclass{article} \usepackage{pst-asr} \psset{everyasr=\tiershortcuts} \newpsstyle{dashed}{linestyle=dashed,dash=3pt 2pt} ...


6

This is a lot easier to do with forest. You can use the phantom option to put trees side by side, and since each syllable is a daughter of the phantom node, you can name nodes for the multi-domainance branches. Since these lines are drawn with regular TikZ commands, you need to make the relevant daughter phantom too. You can add any decorations to the line ...


6

Here's an alternative method which looks better to me when I also add the sn edges style to the tree. Rather than use the nice empty nodes trick of setting shape to coordinate, this creates phantom content for the empty nodes (just an X) and uses a standard text height for all nodes in the tree to keep things aligned. ...


4

You can define an nice empty nodes style as in page 52 of the forest manual. \documentclass{article} \usepackage{forest} \forestset{ nice empty nodes/.style={ for tree={calign=fixed edge angles}, delay={where content={}{for parent={for children={anchor=north}}}{}} }} \begin{document} \begin{forest} for tree={fit=band} [ForceP, nice empty nodes [] ...


1

I wanted to post a solution that amounts to the same thing, but which may be a bit simpler. It uses the index package. You can instruct index to use a specific macro (below, \PageExample) to generate a reference in the index. Below I have it printing entries in the format "Page-Example" (e.g., 2-7). A different format is discussed below. ...


4

An up-to-date TeX distribution has the XCharter OpenType font, so you can use it instead of \renewcommand{\rmdefault}{bch} which will not give you anything except for ASCII characters. Moreover \la as you defined it is just a switch that tells XeLaTeX to use Brill from that point on. A correct document would be \documentclass{article} ...


3

in \la{N} the {} are not doing anything, \la does not take an argument, it switches font for the remainder of the current group. In this case that is the \end{enumerate} So at that point the font (and any other local declarations) revert to the values they had at \begin{enumerate}. It isn't clear if you intended \la just to change the font of N or if you ...


2

The indentation of examples in ExPex is set by the numoffset key. You can set it globally by using \lingset, for example: \lingset{numoffset=.5cm} To set it to match the indents on paragraphs, use: \lingset{numoffset=\parindent}


3

This is a small supplement to Alan Munn's solution. If all of your trees styled with qtree should be aligned with baseline, you can add this to the qtree style also: \documentclass[tikz,border=10pt]{standalone} \usepackage{forest} \forestset{ qtree/.style={ baseline, for tree={ parent anchor=south, child anchor=north, ...


7

To do this in forest you also need to tell it to align node text as center. I've added a qtree style which does this for every node and also makes the branches join unlike the default forest style, which is IMO somewhat ugly. \documentclass[12pt]{article} \usepackage{forest} \forestset{qtree/.style={for tree={parent anchor=south, child ...


2

For completeness, and in partial response to a query in the comments on my other answer, here is the tree set with prftree. As can be seen, this no more lends itself to typesetting this kind of tree than semantic. If anybody wants to typeset natural deduction proofs of this kind for logic, though, it looks like a really nice package with a lot of convenience ...


5

I've never really been a fan of the remember picture and overlay trick/kludge/workaround to get these kinds of effects. So, I am stubbornly sticking with the text effects along path decoration... \documentclass[tikz,border=5]{standalone} \usetikzlibrary{decorations.text,decorations.pathreplacing} \tikzset{% text as nodes/.style args={#1}{ ...


3

You can do it using Tikz by adding calc to the library list and modifying the brace coordinates (you can use any distancing method: cm, points, etc) for the Y axis. Here is a single coordinate example from below: ($(mainclause.north west) + (0,12pt)$) \documentclass[margin=60pt]{standalone} \usepackage{tikz} ...


2

If you label the node containing the text Subordinate clause something like subclauselabel, then you can use the intersections library to find the intersection of perpendicular lines passing through your selected node anchors (e.g., vertical from mainclause.north west and horizontal from subclauselabel.north.west). \documentclass{article} \usepackage{tikz} ...


1

Why do you want use Tikz? You can obtain the results with a simple equation: \documentclass{article} \usepackage{mathtools} % http://ctan.org/pkg/mathtools \begin{document} $\overbrace{\text{She said}\overbrace{\text{that he knows}}^{\text{Subordinate clause}}}^{\text{Main clause}}$ et coetera... \end{document} And the results is:


1

Here, I use stackengine methods to stack the text. It provides a variety of formats for this, relative to alignments, gaps, over/under stacks, top/bottom lapping, etc. I added \def\useanchorwidth{T} to the definition, which allows a wider overset not to affect the spacing of the primary sentence. This, of course, can be removed, as it could result in ...


2

Based on your follow-up questions, I'm starting to think you'd be better off using a glossing package to build your sentences with annotations, and then you can use tikz to add braces, arrows, etc. Here's an example using expex in combination with tikz. The main idea is that we're placing tikz nodes inside the glosses, and then because we're using remember ...


7

The text effects along path decoration may be useful if you want to go further with braces and arrows or drawing around the text in general. The decoration takes a bit of setting up, but it can be customised in quite useful ways, and ultimately a lot of the work can be tidied up in styles. \documentclass[tikz,border=5]{standalone} ...


6

Here's an option that allows you to place tikz environments inline with your normal text. \documentclass{article} \usepackage{tikz} \newcommand{\inline}[2]{% \begin{tikzpicture}[baseline=(word.base), txt/.style={shape=rectangle, inner sep=0pt}]% the baseline key ensures that nodes won't shift up if there's text with descenders, and the txt style ...


7

Not sure if this solution will serve to your further proposes but in any case here it is: \documentclass{article} \usepackage{tikz} \begin{document} This \tikz[baseline]{\node[anchor=text,label={[font=\footnotesize]above:Verb}]{constitutes};}% a \tikz[baseline]{\node[anchor=text, label={[font=\footnotesize]above:Noun}]{sentence};} \end{document}



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