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3

I can't help but feel that there should be a better package somewhere if this is a standard notation. This is most inelegant - not to say hackish. Note that I've switched to LaTeX font commands. \bf, \rm etc. should not be used in LaTeX as they were made obsolete by 2e a couple of decades ago. (I think the documentation uses them because it is intended to ...


3

The problem you are having is due to the fact that tipa redefines basic letters within its IPA environment, which is triggered by \textipa{...}, {\tipaencoding...}, or \begin{IPA}...\end{IPA} (see section 3.2.1 of the tipa manual). As you can see on p. 44 of the manual, a capital V within the IPA environment is typeset as ʋ: This capital letter problem is ...


1

\={\*V} \u{\*V} If you would like to continue using tipa, you can use the command \* to get tipa to print a literal capital letter, instead of reading it as a short cut. For example, as you know, V in the IPA environment is a shorthand for \textscriptv To get an actual V, we have \*V: \begin{IPA} \*V \textbf{\*V} \textsl{\*V} \={\*V} \end{IPA}


4

Your file needs to be encoded as UTF-8, not Latin1, (or if you're using a Mac Mac Roman) With either of these encodings you will get this output. Most editors will allow you to resave the file with that encoding. You should also probably set that to be the default for future files. Output from your file saved as either Latin1 or Mac Roman: Output of ...


6

The stmaryrd package has these symbols ready to go. If one also needs the double brace, which is not in the stmaryrd package, an alternate solution is offered at Defining scalable "white curly brackets" {| and |} (⦃ and ⦄) Here is the MWE for the double brackets and parens. \documentclass{article} \usepackage{stmaryrd} \usepackage{amssymb} ...


4

You can "concatenate" two square brackets using a negative \mkern: \documentclass{article} \usepackage{mathpazo} \begin{document} \[ [\mkern-3.5mu[ \cdot ]\mkern-3.5mu] ^ {\mathcal{M}_i,g} \] \end{document}


3

gb4e The solution to this problem is the same as the solution provided by alexis to a question about how to put judgment marks in front of the translation line: you can use \llap. See that answer for more explanation of how this works. In the example below I defined \context instead of \pream, which adds "Context:" and doesn't have final colon. ...



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