Tag Info

Hot answers tagged

57

Method 1: Find and install the package through your package manager. This is for if you are using the version of TeX that came with your distribution and you don't mind particularly which version of the package you install. Linux distributions tend to include TeX as a collection of packages, but it isn't usually on as fine a level as one TeX package ...


47

So pdfpc on git (which is forked and improved version of the pdf-presenter-console) is the closest thing I found. Features Except for reading out notes in Beamer-Presentations It has all the features I looked for. Regular slides on the projector, view of the next slide and the current one on the laptop. It pre-caches the slides for fast switch and can ...


31

The following four steps permit manual installation of packages on Debian/Ubuntu (and presumably other Linux) systems. Download the package from CTAN (e.g., footmisc.zip). Extract the files and place them in an appropriate directory (e.g., /usr/local/share/texmf/tex/latex/footmisc/). This location is preferable to the main installation tree ...


26

(It's not too polite to answer your-own questions, but this is what I ended up with.) LanguageTool is a very nice standalone, Java-based grammar checker. However, it works on plain text. Therefore, I needed to convert my LaTeX document to as plain as possible text document - Not a simple task. I managed to do it using the following trick: I arranged ...


21

You can always put your personal files in a proper subdirectory of ~/texmf; for instance, your personal .sty files could go in ~/texmf/tex/latex/jana/ This "personal tree" is always consulted for input files before the other trees and doesn't need hashing (with texhash aka mktexlsr). This is by far the preferred method for personal input files. If ...


21

You could use apt-cache: apt-cache search outlines returns for me libfont-freetype-perl - Read font files and render glyphs from Perl using FreeType2 ... texlive-latex-extra - TeX Live: ergänzende Pakete für LaTeX You can see texlive-latex-extra here (even though it's not installed on my system, as dpkg -l | grep texlive shows - I installed TeX 2011 ...


21

You should install TeXlive. Note some distributions like Debian derived ones (e.g. ubuntu) have a version of TeXlive in the package manager. This isn't a great option: it is old and it doesn't have all the packages you might need. Installing the one via the TUG website is much better. See this blog discussion for arguments. TeXlive comes with a variety of ...


20

Running some tests and looking at the output of the process monitor I found that on windows with miktex the "feature" of fontspec to load default settings from a file with the ending .fontspec is slowing down the font search considerably as miktex is looking everywhere for the files. Disabling the feature meant for me that this document needed only around ...


19

If either of these two cases (or both) apply:--- [portability problems] examplestyle.sty = a file as described in the original question: namely, a personal .sty file generally available and used by several on-going projects (e.g., in TEXMFHOME or the less convenient place MikTeX likes to put it); [long-term stability problems] use of packages that are ...


18

It depends on how paranoid your settings in texmf.cnf are. Mine (default texlive 2014) says: % Allow TeX \openin, \openout, or \input on filenames starting with `.' % (e.g., .rhosts) or outside the current tree (e.g., /etc/passwd)? % a (any) : any file can be opened. % r (restricted) : disallow opening "dotfiles". % p (paranoid) : as `r' and ...


17

While in MiKTeX an installation process is automatically triggered if you have, say, \usepackage{beamer} in a document preamble without the corresponding package installed, there is no such feature on TeX Live. The last statement is not true actually, as pointed out by wasteofspace in the comments there is the texliveonfly package that implements the on ...


16

Eclipse strikes me as an odd choice of an IDE to use for LaTeX, but I guess it should work, since the steps in producing a LaTeX-generated document are quite similar to those involved in producing a computer program. The first step is obviously to make sure you have Eclipse and LaTeX themselves installed. Then, if you haven't already done so, you should ...


15

In case you're still interested, I have written a small viewing application in C++, called "dspdfviewer" for "Dual-Screen PDF Viewer". Its built specifically for latex-beamer, and it's "show notes on second screen" option. This latex-beamer option will give you a double-width PDF, where the right part are your beamer-notes, and the right part can include a ...


14

You can use the features provided by the listings package. \documentclass{article} \usepackage{listings} \begin{document} \noindent See the following command : \begin{lstlisting}[language=bash] $ wget http://tex.stackexchange.com \end{lstlisting} \end{document}


14

Ok, I try to give as many answers as possible: Decide if you need it and can use it As you already know, ArXiv does not accept pdfs created from latex code. So you are out here if you use commercial fonts. Of course you can decide the following: print your articles with the commercial fonts submit the same article with a public fonts to arxiv distribute ...


14

In collaborative projects with source files being edited on a variety of platforms, editors, and locales, encoding issues can become a real PITA. In such setting, it is best to define one "right", mandatory encoding (UTF-8), communicate this clearly and stick to it. However, in many cases the collaborators, especially if they stem from the Windows or Mac ...


12

The environment variable OSFONTDIR will override fontconfig information. Specifying directories with a double trailing slash means "please recurse into subdirectories". For example: OSFONTDIR=${HOME}/.fonts:/usr/share/fonts//:/usr/share/texmf/fonts// EDIT: There seems to be an issue with Debian (and thus Ubuntu) texlive packaging, which provides a default ...


12

First, a font does not necessarily support all types of ligatures. Linux Libertine supports only (checked here) Ligatures={Common,Rare,Discretionary}. The OpenType variant of Linux Libertine shipped with media-fonts/libertine-ttf works on an up-to-date Gentoo with TeX Live 2011. Another option is to install the dev-texlive/texlive-fontsextra package, which ...


12

If XeLaTeX is the only format that satisfies your typesetting needs -- in particular, if you can't use LuaLaTeX -- you have two options for suppressing the tt ligature while not also turning off all "common" ligatures entirely: Insert what TeX calls an implicit kern (of zero width) between the two t characters: rot\kern0pt ten % note: no space between ...


12

Modern TeX distributions use kpathsea library to find the files. If your TeX Live cannot find the file, try to run texhash to refresh the file name database. On Linux / Mac, run sudo texhash.


12

It seems that you use a little old version of fontspec. Then try \setmainfont{"[GARA.TTF]"} % with brackets, with or without quotes The brackets means “use font file name.” This should work, like XeTeX primitive \font\1="[GARA.TTF]" \1 In old versions of fontspec, one must use ExternalLocation option to specify a font with it's file name: ...


12

You could use a loop in the shell eg cd myfolder; for i in *.tex; do pdflatex $i;done


11

I had the same requirement when I worked with pgfplots - and I found a way. The resulting steps have made their way into the pgfplots manual, compare the pdf at http://pgfplots.sourceforge.net/ For your convenience, I post a copy of the section about TeX-Live here, it will probably answer your question: 6.2.2 TEXLive or similar installations For Unix ...


11

If you just want to disable the tt ligature without disabling the others and don't want to manually add a kern each time, you can use the xetex charclass mechanism. I don't seem to have the font so I disabled ff in arial instead, also I inserted a 10pt kern rather than 0pt, to make it more obvious. Note in the second line ff is separated but the fi ...


11

I don't believe there are good grammar checkers, but Word's is better than most — provided, that is, you tell it to switch off broken features like checking for passive constructions. You can load your Latex file into Word as a plain text file and look for the highlights that indicates that its grammar checker is concerned about some construction ...


11

Take the editor you are familiar with. Most of the editors have builtin LaTeX support and install the TeX-Packages you need. If you want to have them all, do a sudo apt-get install --install-recommends texlive-full But please be aware that this downloads about 600 MB of software, which expands to about 1.x GB. I am using Eclipse with Texlipse. Some of ...


11

The manual says that you need to add the following to the command line: --add-tex-command citep op --add-tex-command citet op Here op means that each command (\citet or \citep) may have one optional parameter and has one mandatory parameter, and neither should be checked (if you want to check the optional one, use Op instead). See ...


11

Here's my attempt to answer your question and the summary is: don't do it. Here are the datails: Installation I've been attempting the same as you did: Converting OTF fonts to use with pdfLaTeX. As mentioned in the comments, the way to go forward is to use the otfinst script. The website gives details and provides a script specifically for Adobe Garamond ...


11

The TeX Live binaries "know" the location of the TeX Live tree (files, fonts and so on), because they set implicitly some environment variables whose value depends on the location of the binaries themselves. On a Unix system it's so sufficient that the PATH environment variable contains a pointer to the binaries, for example something like ...


11

Is it worth the effort? Yes. The installation is pretty straight forward, especially when you install over the internet; you get the benefit of: having the most up-to-date version of every package (not three-year old ones), tlmgr, which will let you update your packages just as easily as apt-get, and finally, the whole installation process will shed some ...



Only top voted, non community-wiki answers of a minimum length are eligible