Tag Info

Hot answers tagged

12

Markdown with pandoc extensions Advantages: Markdown is commonly used in many places, including all stackexchange sites and README files on github. Once you get the hang of it, Markdown is easy to use. Markdown has very little (almost none) configuration options. This means that when you are writing notes, you will not be distracted with presentation ...


12

You are on the right track with catcode changes. The key is to save the old definition of . with another name before applying the change. The standard approach would look something like \documentclass{article} \begingroup \catcode`\.=\active \gdef.{\normalperiod\formattingcommand}% \endgroup \newcommand{\formattingcommand}{DEMO} ...


7

Here's a solution that doesn't use any extra package and doesn't abuse \marginpar: \documentclass{article} \newcommand{\impmark}{\strut\vadjust{\domark}} \newcommand{\domark}{% \vbox to 0pt{ \kern-\dp\strutbox \smash{\llap{*\kern1em}} \vss }% } \begin{document} This is a paragraph with something \impmark important bla bla bla bla bla bla ...


4

A simple answer to this would be: \documentclass{article} \usepackage{lipsum} \newcommand{\markme}{\marginpar[*]{}} \begin{document} \reversemarginpar \lipsum[1-3]\markme \lipsum[1-3]\markme \end{document} Which gives the desired result. By default \marginpar is creating a margin note on the right side, hence the need for \reversemarginpar. If you ...


3

There are a few problems to be aware of when dealing with category codes and active characters in particular. When character tokens have already entered TeX, their category code is fixed (unless \scantokens is used, but this would open a can of worms). If an active character somehow sneaks into a list for \write, there must be a definition for it. babel ...


2

Did you try sed? cat test <b>Bold text</b>. Regular text, <i>italics</i>, <tt>teletype</tt>, regular. Nested: <b>Bold <i>bold italics</i> again bold</b> sed -e 's|<b>\(.*\)</b>|\\textbf{\1}|g' -e 's|<i>\(.*\)</i>|\\textit{\1}|g' -e ...


2

I feel that as the point of all this is to have as human-friendly input as possible, it would make sense to use markdown or its derivatives (sidenote: I’ve pursued this idea previously). Out of that format I would like to raise tables as an example of kramdowns markdown extensions: | city | age_range | gender | marketing_target | ...


2

The answer to question 3 is yes. You can see this e.g. for @: its catcode in a document is other but \section has no problem to call the internal \@startsection. You can also easily test it: \documentclass{article} %normal catcodes: \newcommand\test{$a_b$} \begin{document} \catcode`\$=11 \catcode`_=11 %changed catcodes: $a_b$ \test \end{document}


2

As I pointed out in my comment, if there is worry about breaking things by making characters active, you can set them up with toggles to turn them on and off. Here, I demonstrate with the left bracket and the macros \newphoneON and \newphoneOFF. Use the latter when you need to employ the left bracket in its normal configuration (e.g., as an optional macro ...


1

A bit of a description of my attempts so far to provide some answers and to expand a bit on the topic. Consider the structure of a table irrespective of how and where it is displayed or printed. A simple table would normally contain some form of a dataset. For example, DATA_LABELS = ['city', 'age_range', 'gender', 'marketing_target']; DATA_SET = [ ...



Only top voted, non community-wiki answers of a minimum length are eligible