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10

This is interesting problem which can be solved by more compact macros than in accepted answer: \long\def\isnextchar#1#2#3{\begingroup\toks0={\endgroup#2}\toks1={\endgroup#3}% \let\tmp=#1\futurelet\next\isnextcharA } \def\isnextcharA{\the\toks\ifx\tmp\next0\else1\fi\space} \def\skipnext#1#2{#1} \def\trynext#1{\trynextA#1\relax\relax} ...


10

Package amsmath uses \Longrightarrow to get the \Implies symbol. \Longrightarrow and \Longleftarrow are composed symbols with the standard fonts (unless a math font is used, which contain ready glyphs for the symbol). The arrow is taken from \Rightarrow and \Leftarrow, the equals sign = is used as prolongation, see macro \Relbar. At larger font sizes, the ...


9

Here's a LuaLaTeX-based solution. It defines a Lua function, named do_subs, that performs substitutions on all the following two-letter and three-letter character combinations: <== <=> ==> <= >= << >> <-- --> -+ +- ... == <> =. =( =) =[ =] By assigning this function to the "process_input_buffer" callback, the ...


8

ConTeXt has this funny asciimath module, which has unfortunately completely different rules (which are highly inconsistent), but it still fits the general task though. Probably there is something about it in Hans' article “When to stop ...” which are the proceedings of his talk at TUG 2015, where he also mentioned asciimath. (I've only seen the talk, the ...


5

The following example solves the reversed bars with \phantom and \rlap: \documentclass{article} \begin{document} \[ \overline{A\overline{B}} \mbox{ vs.\@ } \rlap{$\phantom{A}\overline{\phantom{\overline{B}}}$} \overline{AB} \] \end{document}


3

Since \overline spans the full character width already, one can treat the A and B seperately, in terms of their overlines. \documentclass{article} \begin{document} \[ \overline{A}\overline{\overline{B}} \] \end{document}


3

Don't use \\ for ending lines, except where specifically needed (tabular, array or similar environments) and never leave a blank line before an equation. Narrow columns and cases don't go along well, so you have only one possibility: splitting the lines, one part with the value, one with the condition. More generous vertical space will help the reader in ...


3

First and most important: never use eqnarray for any reason whatsoever. Second: never leave a blank line before a display. Third: LaTeX doesn't force anybody to use \left and \right in front of each parenthesis or bracket; if your editor does it automatically, disable the feature. Fourth: from the chosen breaks, I guess you're writing in a two column ...


3

It's simpler to do it with pst-node: consider variables you want to link as \rnodes, and connect them with the \ncbar command: \documentclass[12pt]{article} \usepackage{amsmath} \usepackage{mathtools} \usepackage{pst-node, auto-pst-pdf} \begin{document} \begin{postscript} \begin{equation} \begin{gathered} \phi (\rnode{n1}{x_1}) \quad \phi ...


2

The Comprehensive Symbol Guide is your flexible friend concerning lookup of thousands of symbols: \documentclass{article} \begin{document} $\bot\bot\bot$ \end{document}


2

This is a single equation, not a collection of equations that are being aligned, so I would use equation*, the * suppresses the equation number, and do the alignment with split, as below. This way, if I later find I need to refer to this equation and add a number all I need do is change the outer environment to equation and add a \label command. ...


2

Either use \begin{align*}...\end{align*} or use \nonumber for a specific equation to be suppressed in an align environment. This might get tedious if all equations in an align environment should be unnumbered. General rule: An environment or command with * most times means: 'Do not number' The same is true for alignat and alignat* environments and ...


2

The star form \begin{align*}...\end{align*} suppresses the equation number: \documentclass[conference]{IEEEtran} \usepackage{amsmath} \begin{document} \begin{align*} f_{n}(\beta,\lambda)&= \lambda(1-\lambda/n)^{n-1} \int_{0} ^{1} g_{n}(\beta,\lambda)d\alpha \\ & \leq \lambda(1-\lambda/n)^{n-1}\int_{0}^{1} ...


1

The version of parentheses for probability is not obvious. A suggestion (one displaymath in \[...\]): \documentclass{article} \begin{document} \[ \Pr\{\mathrm{NC}|\alpha\}= \left\{ \begin{array}{ll} (1-p)^{n-1}(1-p+p(\alpha + \beta)^{2})^{n-1} & 0\leq x \leq \beta \\ (1-p)^{n-1}(1-p+4p\alpha\beta)^{n-1} & \beta\leq x\leq \beta-1\\ ...


1

TeX will only introduce line-breaks where it deems it necessary, and aaaaaaaaaaaaaaa does not represent a word that can by properly hyphenated. If you wish to comment on lines within your proof, set the comment in a top-aligned box of fixed width. Below I've used a \parbox of width 20em (adjust as needed). You can also use a tabular or some other ...



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