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13

I offer three variants, all of them are fine IMHO, and which one you choose depends only on your preferences somehow: \documentclass{article} \usepackage{mathtools} \begin{document} \[ \begin{pmatrix} \varphi\begin{pmatrix} 1 & 0 \\ 0 & 0 \end{pmatrix} & \varphi\begin{pmatrix} 0 & 1 \\ 0 & 0 \end{pmatrix} \\ ...


6

Here are two options: \documentclass{article} \usepackage{amsmath} \newcommand{\subplus}{\mathbin{\genfrac{}{}{0pt}{}{}{+}}} \newcommand{\subminus}{\mathbin{\genfrac{}{}{0pt}{}{}{-}}} \newcommand{\subcdots}{\genfrac{}{}{0pt}{}{}{\cdots}} \begin{document} Option 1: \[ 1 - \begin{array}{@{}*{8}{c@{}}} 1 & & 1 & & 1 & ...


5

If you are referring to the alignment of the D the reason that is slightly off is that space that a 0 occupies is different than a i occupies. The aligned environment provides a right alignment for the text before the &, which is what you were seeing. One way to solve that would be to ensure that the letters i and j are typeset as the same width as the ...


5

TeX distinguishes text accents (usually with single symbol names like \^) from math accents (usually with multi-letter names like \hat) so: In math: $\hat{G}$ or perhaps $\widehat{G}$ In text: \^{G} Or if you specify a suitable input encoding such as utf8 then you could just type the letter directly in text as Ĝ


4

You need to use an inner math environment along with cases In this case you don't really need to use align and simply equation would yield identical results as above Notes: As what you have clearly is not a matrix you should not use the matrix environment. Code: align \documentclass{article} \usepackage{amsmath} \begin{document} \begin{align} ...


4

Your example works only as expected if the bold font ends at the end of some group. It doesn't work if the code does something like \bfseries some text \normalfont some text or \bfseries some text \mdseries some text You will have to issue a \mathversion{normal} in such cases. E.g. in your example with \g@addto@macro\normalfont{\mathversion{normal}} ...


3

There is no space so you will have to modify the font you are using or switch to some font that suits you better. Each font has some kerning definitions and sometimes even special kernings for certain character pairs. This is a lot of work to create such a font or to modify. So I think, you are better with searching for some wider spaced font for maths. If ...


3

Use empheq (but first think again if you really need separate numbers): \documentclass{article} \usepackage{amsmath} \usepackage{empheq} \begin{document} \setcounter{equation}{9} % just for the example \begin{subequations} \begin{empheq}[left=\empheqlbrace]{align} k \cdot E &= 0 \\ k \cdot B &= 0 \end{empheq} \end{subequations} \end{document}


3

Avoid putting display math environments one after the other (use a multiline environment such as align if that's needed. \vbox shouldn't be used within a latex document. \documentclass[12pt]{article} \usepackage{amsmath} \usepackage{ytableau} \begin{document} \ytableausetup{boxsize=1em} \begin{equation} \ydiagram{2,1} ...


3

Seems like a strange way to write TeX to me:) Nonetheless, I think that you can do what you want if you just use \ensuremath instead of explicitly entering math-mode with $...$ inside your acronyms: \documentclass{article} \usepackage[printonlyused,withpage]{acronym} \begin{document} \begin{acronym} \acro{a}[\ensuremath{a}]{scalar quantity a} ...


2

Making only the most minor of changes to the 1st of my former approaches cited in the related question, perhaps this is what you are asking for. The change amounts to placing the \scaleto inside a recursive stack. I used the \quietstack option of the stackengine package, to not print out intermediate results, saving it for the end with ...


2

Surely a bad idea, but very easy to implement. \documentclass{article} \begin{document} $\pi=3.14159^{2^{6^{5358979323846264338327950288419716939937510}}}$ \end{document}


2

If you like matrix-like tools, maybe array will be suitable for you. \documentclass{article} \usepackage{amsmath} \begin{document} \[ \left\{ \begin{array}{@{}r@{\;=\;}l} \Delta l & \Delta l_1 + \Delta l_2\\ N & N_1(\Delta l_1)=N_2(\Delta_2)\\ \end{array} \right. \] \end{document} @ kills \arraycolsep, adding its ...


2

I have another idea, maybe split will be suitable for you. \documentclass{article} \usepackage{amsmath} \begin{document} \begin{equation} \left\{ \begin{split} \Delta l &= \Delta l_1 + \Delta l_2\\ N &= N_1(\Delta l_1)=N_2(\Delta_2)\\ \end{split}\right. \end{equation} \end{document}


1

One can have a slightly simpler syntax with the empheq package (which loads mmathtools, hence amsmath): \documentclass{article} \usepackage[overload]{empheq} \begin{document} \begin{equation}[left=\empheqlbrace] \!\begin{aligned} Δ l &= Δ l_1 + Δ l_2\\ N &= N_1(Δ l_1)=N_2(Δ_2) \end{aligned} \end{equation} \end{document} ...


1

I suggest using \makebox and \raisebox. The top diagram can be set in a box as wide as the requested displacement, the bottom one moved down by 1em (the size of a square) plus the displacement. \documentclass[12pt]{article} \usepackage{amsmath} \usepackage{ytableau} \usepackag-e{calc} \begin{document} \begin{equation} \ytableausetup{boxsize=1em} ...


1

Here are the options you have rewording the sentence adding \allowbreak at appropriate points in the formula, e.g. P(x,\allowbreak y,\allowbreak z) = q displaying the equation without a number using the package microtype to give more flexibility to spacing in the paragraph increasing \emergencystretch for the paraagraph: {\emergencystretch=1.5em .... \par} ...


1

The matrix environments of the amsmath package have to be set in math mode. You didn't do that, thus TeX is searching for some $ which enables this math mode. If you put it in $...$, \(...\), \[...\], \begin{displaymath}...\end{displaymath}, \begin{equation}...\end{equation} or \begin{equation*}...\end{equation*}, (and most certainly others...,) it will ...



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