Hot answers tagged

23

If you look carefully you can see that the angle changes if the part below the root sign gets larger until it is vertical. Imho all math fonts will do it. So if you want a slant: make the content smaller, e.g. by using \nolimits: \documentclass{article} \begin{document} \[ \sqrt{1+ \sqrt{1+ \sqrt{1 + \sqrt{1+ \sqrt{1+ \sqrt{1+x}}}}}} \] \[ ...


18

The only math font package I know that has slanted surds at large sizes is mtpro2: \documentclass{article} \usepackage[lite]{mtpro2} \begin{document} \[ \SQRT{1+ \SQRT{1+ \SQRT{1 + \SQRT{1+ \SQRT{1+ \SQRT{1+x}}}}}} \] \[ \SQRT{\sum_{i = 1}^{n}{x^i}} \] \end{document} Note that \SQRT should be used for this to work. Unfortunately, adapting this to ...


10

With MinionMath-Regular: \documentclass{article} \usepackage{unicode-math} \setmathfont{MinionMath-Regular.otf} \begin{document} \[ \sqrt{{x^i}} \] \[ \sqrt{\sum_{i = 1}{x^i}} \] \[ \sqrt{\sum^{n}{x^i}} \] \[ \sqrt{\sum_{i = 1}^{n}{x^i}} \] \end{document}


8

A similar thing came up the other day with Hàn Thế Thành describing how pdftex avoids the accumulation of errors. http://tug.org/pipermail/tex-live/2016-January/037682.html Basically if there is a small relative space specified the renderer may have to adjust that to the nearest pixel, but should keep track of how far it is from the ideal position so that ...


7

Well, first of all, if your equation is intended to be inline you should be using single $s only - i.e. $ ... $. In fact, in general, $$ ... $$ is deprecated in LaTeX: Why is \[ ... \] preferable to $$ ... $$? Now, onto the main point. I think what you're doing is enclosing the entire mathematical equation in $ ... $ (this is correct) and individual ...


7

Make sure the \abs macro is defined. \documentclass{article} \usepackage{mathtools} % for '\DeclarePairedDelimiter' macro \DeclarePairedDelimiter{\abs}{\lvert}{\rvert} % define '\abs' macro \begin{document} $\frac{\abs{\lambda_f}}{8\pi^2}$\quad $\dfrac{\abs{\lambda_f}}{8\pi^2}$ \end{document}


6

Here you are, I think. You don't have to add \tag, numbering is automatic. Also, don't add \\ at the end: it creates a new line and a new tag. \documentclass[a4paper, 11pt]{book} \usepackage[utf8]{inputenc} \usepackage{fourier, heuristica} % not necessary, just personal preference \usepackage{mathtools} \begin{document} \begin{align} ...


6

I propose this: \documentclass{article} \usepackage{amsmath} \newcommand{\mytextarrow}[1]{\mathrel{\relbar\mkern-10mu\relbar\mkern-3.5mu\raisebox{0.25ex}{\scriptsize#1}\!\rightarrow}} \begin{document} \begin{equation*} 2 + 2 \mytextarrow{goes to} 4 \end{equation*} \end{document}


6

Two suggestions: You could affix \nolimits to \sum, to force LateX to set the limits of summation to the side rather than above and below the summation symbol. That way, the surds will be noticeably less steep and their overall height will be much reduced, reducing their visual dominance. Of course, if you side-set the limits of summation, the formulas ...


5

We could do it, but it would be wrong. \documentclass{article} \usepackage{amsmath} \usepackage{graphicx} \begin{document} \[ \sqrt{\sum_{i = 1}^{n}{x^i}} \] \[ \scalebox{2}{$\displaystyle\sqrt{\scalebox{0.5}{$\displaystyle\sum_{i = 1}^{n}{x^i}$}}$} \] \end{document}


5

I'm not sure what's the purpose of this, but here it is: \documentclass{article} \usepackage{mathtools} \DeclareRobustCommand{\subsup}[3]{{% \mathpalette\makesubsup{{#1}{#2}{#3}}% }} \makeatletter \providecommand{\@firstofthree}[3]{#1} \providecommand{\@secondofthree}[3]{#2} \providecommand{\@thirdofthree}[3]{#3} \newcommand{\makesubsup}[2]{% ...


5

\documentclass{article} \usepackage[T1]{fontenc} \usepackage{amsmath} \usepackage{sansmath} \begin{document} foo \sansmath \begin{align*} a & b & c \end{align*} \end{document}


5

I'm not sure if you really want this; however, here it is. \documentclass{article} \usepackage{amsmath} \usepackage{unicode-math} \ExplSyntaxOn \NewDocumentCommand{\defineoversetchar}{m} { \clist_map_inline:nn { #1 } { \kasper_define_overset_char:n { ##1 } } } \cs_new_protected:Nn \kasper_define_overset_char:n { \cs_new_protected:cn { ...


5

You have a spurious extra \\ after the first equation. Remove it, and the extra line will disappear. For the second equation, do consider using a cases environment; for one, the left-hand curly brace will be a bit larger. \documentclass{article} \usepackage{amsmath} % for 'cases' env. and `\text` macro \numberwithin{equation}{section} % just for this ...


4

I'd use smaller type vertically centered with respect to the math axis: \documentclass{article} \usepackage{amsmath} \newcommand{\crightarrow}[1]{% \relbar\joinrel\joinrel\relbar\mathrel{\vcentertext{#1}}\rightarrow } \newcommand{\vcentertext}[1]{% \vcenter{\hbox{\scriptsize\smallstrut#1}}% } \newcommand{\smallstrut}{\vrule height 1.5ex depth 0.5ex ...


4

align and align* use a vertical skip amount of about 10pt above the environment. This can be set to 0pt, but this should be done within a group, i.e. use {% \abovedisplayskip=0pt% \begin{align*} ... \end{align*} }% Please note, that there's \belowdisplayskip as well, having the analogous meaning for the space below the environment. Reducing just one ...


3

The problem is that the inner sep and line width do not change with the font. The solution is to define a length that does change proportionately with the font. I chose the height of \mathstrut, but almost anything will do. Also, by drawing the circle separately, you can adjust its size and the size of the contents ($r$) separately. ...


3

You could use the \overset macro, which is provided by the amsmath package: \documentclass{article} \usepackage{amsmath} % for \overset and \text macros \begin{document} \begin{equation} E[|A\cup B|]=E[|A|+|B|-|A\cap B|] \overset{\text{linearity}}{=} E[|A|]+E[|B|]-E[|A\cap B|] \end{equation}\ \end{document} Addendum: If you also need the vertical ...


3

Here's a start, with \Ss{}{}{}. EDITED to work with displaystyle stuff, too. EDITED to automatically work with subscripting styles, as well. FIXED obvious bug that macro did not behave properly if superscript length exceeded subscript length. \documentclass{article} \usepackage{amsmath,stackengine,scalerel} ...


3

In your linked question Yiannis writes: When using the \DeclareMathSizes the first parameter for the text font must be exactly what is used in the class declaration. For example with Beamer rather declare \documentclass[10pt]{beamer}, otherwise the command will appear as it is not working. That is not a hundred percent correct. You have to use ...


3

\usepackage{tikz} \usetikzlibrary{arrows.meta} \newlength\tmplength \newcommand*\textarrow[2][3em] {\mathrel{\vcenter{\hbox{\settowidth\tmplength{\scriptsize#2}% \tikz[font=\scriptsize] \draw[->](0,0)--node[fill=white,midway]{#2} ++({#1+\the\tmplength},0);}}}} and ...


2

You could draw this with tikz: \documentclass{article} \usepackage{amsmath,tikz} \newcommand{\curvearc}{\tikz[trim left]{\draw[->] (0,0) to[bend left] (1em,0);}} \begin{document} \( \stackrel{\curvearc}{AB} \) \end{document}


2

\documentclass{article} \usepackage{amsmath} \newcommand{\textarrow}[1]{-\text{#1}\to} \begin{document} \begin{equation*} 2 + 2 \textarrow{goes to} 4 \end{equation*} \end{document}


2

\usepackage{fourier} Then $\wideOarc{AB}$ However, as Andrew Swann noted in a comment, loading the fourier package changes all the fonts in the document.


2

The systeme package does this in a very pretty way: \documentclass{article} \usepackage{amsmath} \usepackage{systeme} \begin{document} \[ \systeme{ x_{1} - 3x_{2} + 4x_{3} = -4, 3x_{1} - 7x_{2} + 7x_{3} = -8, -4x_{1} + 6x_{2} - x_{3} = 7 } \] \end{document} If you search on the site for systeme, you'll find several other examples. For ...


2

To remove this question from the list of unanswered questions and inform those interested: The fix is now available on TeX Live. Thanks again to @egreg and @DavidCarlisle for the fast response, that a fix was already on the way.


1

Verdana is a sans font that has serifs on the capital i.


1

You can use \overset and \substack, with a trick for making the annotation to have zero width: \documentclass{article} \usepackage{amsmath} \newcommand{\annoterel}[2]{% \overset{% \substack{\hidewidth\text{#1}\hidewidth\\\downarrow}% }{#2}% } \begin{document} \begin{equation} E[|A\cup B|] = E[|A|+|B|-|A\cap B|] \annoterel{linearity}{=} ...


1

I use the pdfocr program with tesseract when I want to ocr my pdf's on linux I use the ppa:gezakovacs/pdfocr repository for pdfocr and sudo apt-get update sudo apt-get install pdfocr sudo apt-get install tesseract-ocr sudo apt-get install tesseract-ocr-eng The command to convert is pdfocr -i input.pdf -o output.pdf In addition, prior to ...



Only top voted, non community-wiki answers of a minimum length are eligible