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8

There are in fact very few standards for such things. There is ISO 80000-2 which is an ISO standard "Quantities and units — Part 2: Mathematical signs and symbols to be used in the natural sciences and technology" this is the standard referenced by the rather unfortunately named isomath package and mathstyle=iso option to unicode-math. (I say unfortunate as ...


1

You should use a different command for “improperly placed differential”: \newcommand\ipdif[1]{\mathrm{d}#1\,} and use it only if followed by other symbols (choose another name, if you want). With \mathop{}\!\mathrm{d} you'd get an unwanted thin space between the integral symbol and the “d”. If you add a trailing \mathop{} you get two thin spaces between ...


1

I believe that the right way to use a sans serif font for operators with the unicode-math package is the following: \documentclass{article} \usepackage{unicode-math} \ExplSyntaxOn \makeatletter \renewcommand{\operator@font}{\um_switchto_mathsf:} \makeatother \ExplSyntaxOff \begin{document} $\sin{x}$ \end{document} This will not work unless you use ...


1

\documentclass{article} \begin{document} \[ \in \mbox{and} \ni \] \end{document} The symbol can be found in "Table 139: Letter-like Symbols" of The Comprehensive LaTeX Symbol List.


1

The amsmath package already provides the needed tools: Bmatrix for the multiline matrix with curly braces and bmatrix for the matrix with square brackets. \documentclass[a4paper,12pt,numbers=noenddot]{scrartcl} \usepackage{amsmath} \begin{document} Here is an equation \begin{equation} \nabla_Q N_I = \begin{Bmatrix} N_{I,1} \\ N_{I,2} \\ N_{I,3} ...


1

Here is a way. I define an lrcases and a dlrcases environment, analogous to the (d)cases and (d)rcases environments from mathtools. The code is borrowed from @Gonzalo Medina: \documentclass{article} \usepackage[utf8]{inputenc} \usepackage{mathtools, bm} \makeatletter \newcases{dlrcases}{\quad}{% ...


2

the equation number was a syntax error extra { (don't ignore error messages!) You can get bold math italic using \bm from the package of the same name. Also: don't use \emph in math mode, and you do not need \limits here. \documentclass[a4paper,12pt,numbers=noenddot]{scrartcl} \usepackage{mathtools} \usepackage{bm} \begin{document} \begin{equation} ...


2

Here you are: it is enough to use \min. I also replaced the pair of || with a \norm command, defined with the help of the mathtools package. The star version adds a pair of implicit \left … \right on both sides of the \Vert delimiters. If you want to fine-tune the size of the delimiters, use an optional argument instead, such as \norm[\big]{…} instead. ...


6

I would write \min instead of \textnormal {min} \limits, and I would use \lVert and \rVert instead of ||. \begin{equation} \lVert \mathbf{x}^{1} - \overline{\mathbf{x}}^{2} \rVert = % \min_{ \mathbf{x}^{2} \subseteq \Gamma^{2} } % \lVert \mathbf{x}^{1} - \mathbf{x}^{2} ({\pmb \xi}) \rVert \end{equation}


1

In the preamble, you load a Times-based text font, but no corresponding math font. Interestingly, loading either the mathptmx or the txfonts package -- which provide both text and math fonts -- doesn't help. However, loading either the newtxmath or the mtpro2 package, along with a Times text font package such as newtxtext, does the job. First, the outcome ...


5

the two symbols aren't in the same class, so they'll invariably get some space in between. to turn an operator or a relation into an "ordinary" character, wrap it in braces. then, combine them and wrap the whole thing in braces, applying \mathbin or \mathrel as appropriate: \documentclass{article} \begin{document} \[ a \mathbin{{+}{=}} b \mathrel{{=}{+}} ...


3

You shouldn't use @ in command names, when using ConTeXt; but you should be aware of the fact that ConTeXt uses Unicode math, so the standard math code of the hyphen cannot be accessed to with \mathcode. \begingroup \catcode`\"=12 \catcode`\`=12 % added a safe setting for the backquote \gdef\newmcodes{\mathcode`\'39\mathcode`\*42\mathcode`\."613A ...


3

First, you need at most \displaystyle per line but you are probably better off using \[...\] or an equation environment. Secondly, to get the spacing right around operators rather than using \text it is better to use \DeclareMathOperator{\tr}{tr} from the amsmath package. Next, I suspect that what you really want here is to put everything into an ...


2

This solution: \documentclass{article} \begin{document} \[ \int^b_a f(x)dx=\left. F(x) \right]^b_a=F(b)-F(a) \] \[ \int^b_a f(x)dx=\left. \frac{F(x)}{1} \right]^b_a=F(b)-F(a) \] \[ \int^b_a f(x)dx=\left. \frac{\frac{F(x)}{1}}{270-269} \right]^b_a=F(b)-F(a) \] \end{document} adjusts properly, as the height and width of the content between \left. and ...


3

Assuming that what you are looking for is: You can do this quite nicely with \Biggr|: \[ 2x + \frac{2}{3}x^{\frac{3}{2}} + \frac{1}{x}\Biggr|_{1}^{9} \] Personally, I prefer this approach. As you can see the line extends slightly above and below the the expression to its left. It also saves you having to have a preceding \left. Use \Biggr| where you ...


1

You may want to reserve the use of \mathsf for the names of variables; I wouldn't extend its use to the indexing variables 0, i, j, n-1, etc. To write the expression more compactly, you may also want to load the mathtools package (a superset of the amsmath package) and that package's \smashoperator directive. Finally, as the other answers have suggested as ...


3

You can use one of the \big,\Big,\bigg, \Bigg commands to adjust the size of the delimiters to your needs. This can be automatised with the DeclarePairedDelimiter from mathtools. An example is the \set command which be used in the \set* version, which corresponds to a pair of \left … \right; alternatively, it accepts an optional argument \big, \Big, &c. ...


3

\left and \right always produce fences which are symmetric with respect to the formula axis, that is, the imaginary line where fraction lines would lie on. With big operators having limits there is no need the fences cover them; in this case \bigg is sufficient and avoids too large delimiters. There's only one small manual fix: adding \, between the bracket ...



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