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2

this does not exist as a "precomposed" symbol. however, amsmath provides a mechanism for creating combinations of this sort -- \overset: \documentclass{article} \usepackage{amsmath} \begin{document} $ x \overset{0}{\equiv} y $ \end{document} when \overset is applied to a single symbol, the proper class of that symbol (e.g., \mathrel, \mathbin) is ...


3

It is not a long answer, and working in LaTeX, not plain TeX, but according to Werner's suggestion... \stackrel{?}{=}


3

\documentclass{article} \setlength\textwidth{4cm} %\newcommand\dup[1]{\;{#1}\discretionary{}{\hbox{$#1$}}{}\;} \relpenalty=10000 \newcommand\dup[1]{#1\discretionary{}{\hbox{$#1$}}{}}% improved version from wipet \begin{document} \noindent X\dotfill X $ A \dup\subset A \dup\subset A \dup\subset A \dup\subset A \dup\subset A \dup\subset A \dup\subset A ...


3

As others already mentioned, the floating point unit (FPU) shipped with PGF currently has no implementation of atan2 (it should get one; this is a bug). A workaround is to configure pgfplots that it should not use the FPU. This works for the image in question (but is, in general, not recommended since it limits both data range + precision). ...


5

You can fake it by falling back to PGF atan2 function pretending to be a fpu implementation. \documentclass[]{standalone} \usepackage{pgfplots} \pgfplotsset{compat=1.11} \makeatletter \pgfmathdeclarefunction{myatan2}{2}{% \begingroup% \pgfmathfloattofixed{#1}\edef\tempa{\pgfmathresult}% \pgfmathfloattofixed{#2}% \pgfkeys{pgf/fpu=false}% ...


2

I think I got the quadrants right. \documentclass[]{article} \usepackage{tikz} \usepackage{pgfplots} \begin{document} \begin{tikzpicture} \begin{axis}[ title={$atan2(-\sin(y),x-cos(y))$}, xlabel=$x$, ylabel=$y$, ] \addplot3[surf,domain=0:1,domain y=0:360,] {x == cos(y) ? ( -sin(y) > 0 ? 90: -90) : (x > cos(y) ? atan(-sin(y)/(x-cos(y))): ...


2

You may want to have an abstract approach to this; we can exploit the fact that amsmath changes all operator names taking limits in a uniform way, by adding @ at the end of the name to mean the symbol. \documentclass{article} \usepackage{amsmath,etoolbox} \makeatletter \newtoggle{reducedop} \newcommand{\reduceoperatorsize}[1]{% \csletcs{#1saved}{#1}% ...


1

Based on comment discussion, I had suggested something similar to the answer at How are big operators defined?, in the form of \DeclareMathOperator*{\barr}{\textstyle\sum}. However, that approach still places displaystyle limits above and below the summation (ex. 1). Nonetheless, we know that the spacing provided by \barr in textstyle (ex. 2) is the proper ...



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