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0

Here's an option with mathtools package. I show here the different possible sizes and usage. \documentclass{scrartcl} \usepackage{mathtools} \DeclarePairedDelimiterX\set[1]\lbrace\rbrace{\def\given{\;\delimsize\vert\;}#1} \begin{document} $\set{ x \given x > 0 }$ $\set[\big]{ x \given x > 0 }$ $\set[\Big]{ x \given x > 0 }$ $\set[\bigg]{ x \given ...


0

LaTeX puts at your disposal the package braket that helps you creating beautiful sets, kets and bras for the Dirac notation. In particular \set{x, \mid x<2} \ket{\psi} \bra{\phi} do the job as simple as that.


14

To answer your specific question: To quote from Leslie Lamport's "LaTeX: A Document Preparation System" (Leslie Lamport initially developed LaTeX): The ten special characters # $ % & ~ _ ^ \ { } are used only in LaTeX commands. ... Seven of those symbols can be produced by typing a \ in front of the corresponding character. ...


4

If your aim is to change the typesetting of operator names to use sans serif type, you should define a new symbol font: \documentclass{article} \usepackage{amsmath} % a new symbol font for names of operators \DeclareSymbolFont{sfoperators}{OT1}{cmss}{m}{n} % don't waste a math group \DeclareSymbolFontAlphabet{\mathsf}{sfoperators} % tell LaTeX to use ...


6

The blackness of the symbol is not fully satisfying, but here's a possible solution: \documentclass{article} \usepackage{amsmath} \usepackage{graphicx} \makeatletter \newcommand{\sigmaop}[1]{\mathop{\mathpalette\@sigmaop{#1}}\slimits@} \newcommand{\@sigmaop}[2]{% \vphantom{\sum}% \sbox\z@{$\m@th#1\sum$}% \dimen@=\ht\z@ \advance\dimen@\dp\z@ ...


3

The package does not seem to be on CTAN, thus I found this wick.sty. A protected macro instead of \mathbf and additional braces for starting or ending points helped in the example from wick.sty: \documentclass{article} \usepackage{wick} \newcommand{\wickbold}{}% Check that \wickbold is undefined \protected\def\wickbold#1{\mathbf{#1}} \begin{document} \[ ...


2

The primitive \over as used by \frac automatically switches styles. The \tfrac and \dfrac macros are for special cases to force text or display style. \ifinner does not test for text/display distinction so the solution is simple, replace all \ifinner \tfrac{..}{..} \else \dfrac{..}{..} \fi by \frac{..}{..} For your second question, I wouldn't use the ...


1

This solution uses \genfrac although not exclusively; however it does avoid \atop and works with MathJax. \[ \sum_{m\ge0}\left\langle\!\!\!\genfrac<>{0pt}{}{n}{m}\!\!\!\right\rangle x^{m} \]


2

The following example takes the double brackets from package MnSymbol and uses \genfrac. An alternative would be a simple matrix environment. \documentclass{article} \usepackage{amsmath} \makeatletter \@ifpackageloaded{MnSymbol}{}{% \DeclareFontFamily{OMX}{MnSymbolE}{} \DeclareSymbolFont{largesymbolsMn}{OMX}{MnSymbolE}{m}{n} ...


1

I had the same problem, wanting to use \sim for the (unary) logical negation operator. Building on egreg's answer from above, another option is to simply redefine the \sim command so that it produces the tilde without the space: \let\oldsim\sim \renewcommand{\sim}{{\oldsim}}



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