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1

I'm not sure what's the meaning of this, but you can try with relsize: \documentclass{article} \usepackage{amssymb,relsize} \newcommand{\fancybrackets}[1]{% \mathopen{\mathlarger{\mathlarger{\sqsubset}}}% #1% \mathclose{\mathlarger{\mathlarger{\sqsupset}}}% } \begin{document} $\fancybrackets{G_{n}}$ \end{document}


2

Something like The symbols are obtained through these definitions (need graphicx package): \newcommand{\bigsqsubset}{\mathrel{\text{\scalebox{1.5}{$\sqsubset$}}}} \newcommand{\bigsqsupset}{\mathrel{\text{\scalebox{1.5}{$\sqsupset$}}}} MWE: \documentclass{article} \usepackage{amsmath,amssymb} \usepackage{graphicx} ...


2

\documentclass{article} \usepackage{mathtools} \begin{document} There are many ways to enter maths mode. \begin{equation} \text{equation} = \text{one way} \end{equation} but \[ \text{equation} \not\equiv \text{maths mode} \] If $\{x_1,...,x_n\} = \{\text{ways}\}$ then $n \equiv \text{many}$. \end{document}


6

A picture is worth a thousand words: I have attached a picture alongside its generating code for comparison. You can click on the image for a bigger view (nice feature new to TeX.SX). Paying a close look, you observe a perfect alignment between first and fourth expressions where both come from mathmode. The second nearest is the third, then comes the ...


9

If you insist on not changing the body of your source, you could make * math-active \documentclass{article} \mathcode`\*="8000 % {\catcode`\*=\active\gdef*{\cdot}} \begin{document} Here we have some asterisks: * * * * * Now we some some mathematics: $a*b*c$. \end{document}


26

\cdot is defined by \DeclareMathSymbol{\cdot}{\mathbin}{symbols}{"01} So you just need to put this in your preamble \DeclareMathSymbol{*}{\mathbin}{symbols}{"01}


14

A math atom has three fields: the base, the subscript and the superscript. When you attach a subscript or superscript to a symbol, it doesn't lose its type. So the whole \otimes_{K} (the braces could be omitted here, because the subscript has just one token) is considered as a Bin atom. Thus with U \otimes_{K} V you get the sequence [U]Ord [medium ...


13

Let's see what Ellen Swanson in page 20 of her classic Mathematics into Type has to say about this:


5

You can just look in stix.sty and extract the definition for any character: \documentclass{article} \DeclareFontEncoding{LS1}{}{} \DeclareFontSubstitution{LS1}{stix}{m}{n} \DeclareSymbolFont{arrows1} {LS1}{stixsf} {m} {n} \DeclareMathDelimiter{\DDownarrow} {\mathrel}{arrows1}{"FF}{arrows1}{"FF} \begin{document}\showoutput \[\alpha + \sum x_i ...


1

In the next version of unicode-math there'll be an interface for this: \setmathfontface\mathfoo{texgyrechorus-mediumitalic.otf} \setoperatorfont\mathfoo Please speak up if you think there might be a better way to do this :)


3

Seems to be \mathfrak{X} from the amssymb package. You can find this out yourself using http://detexify.kirelabs.org/classify.html.



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