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4

Rather than use built up symbols you can use a font with ⫫ (U+2aeb) such as stix You can just use \not for the negation. \documentclass{article} \usepackage{stix} \begin{document} $a \Vbar b \mid c $ $a \not\Vbar b \mid c $ \end{document}


2

Say: \documentclass{article} \usepackage{mathtools,cancel} \begin{document} % function for conditional independence - from link above \newcommand{\bigCI}{\mathrel{\text{\scalebox{1.07}{$\perp\mkern-10mu\perp$}}}} \newcommand{\nbigCI}{\cancel{\mathrel{\text{\scalebox{1.07}{$\perp\mkern-10mu\perp$}}}}} a $\bigCI$ c $\mid$ b a $\nbigCI$ c $\cancel{\mid}$ b ...


4

I'm not sure about the advantage of scaling the symbol by 7%. I propose the definitions for both the scaled and unscaled symbol. \documentclass{article} \usepackage{amsmath,graphicx,centernot} % function for conditional independence - from link above \newcommand{\bigCI}{\mathrel{\text{\scalebox{1.07}{$\perp\mkern-10mu\perp$}}}} ...


2

And here is more simple definition than @egregs ooalign: \def\gdw{\mathrel{{>}\mkern-13mu{<}}} $A \gdw B$ And it is optical better:


5

This is the unicode U+2AA4 named "GREATER-THAN OVERLAPPING LESS-THAN". Here, you may see, which fonts support this symbol and here, which fonts on your system do provide it. The MWE requires Lua- or XeLaTeX. It just shows two fonts I found on my PC. Of course, you should define your preferred version in a \mathrel-command. % arara: lualatex ...


6

A simple application of \ooalign: \documentclass{article} % Simple version if you don't need it in sub/superscripts %\newcommand\gdw{\mathrel{\ooalign{$<$\cr$>$\cr}}} % Fuller version \makeatletter \newcommand{\gdw}{\mathrel{\mathpalette\@gdw@\relax}} \newcommand{\@gdw@}[2]{\ooalign{$\m@th#1<$\cr$\m@th#1>$\cr}} \makeatother \begin{document} ...


0

egreg's answer is fine but works poorly for existing mathematical symbols. I recommend the following: \newcommand{\operator}[1]{\mathop{\vphantom{\sum}\mathchoice {\vcenter{\hbox{\huge $#1$}}} {\vcenter{\hbox{\Large $#1$}}}{#1}{#1}}\displaylimits} To define an operator 'A', you can now type \newcommand{\opA}{\operator{\mathrm{A}}} But you can also ...


3

If you need rounded corner then you can use \pdfliteral primitive, for example: \let\sqrtori=\sqrt \def\sqrt#1{\setbox0=\hbox{$\sqrtori{#1}$}\sqrtori{#1}% \raise\ht0\hbox{\kern-.2pt\sqrtZ\kern.5pt}} \def\sqrtZ{\pdfliteral{q 1 j .3985 w 0 -.5977 m .5 -.5977 l .5 -2 l S Q}} $\sqrt2$ \end The result: The constants used in the path ...


2

Because the suffix to R is textual (and not mathematical) you should use the package amsmath and the command \text in R_{\text{eş}} This will take care of two things: the letters "e" and "ş" are both roman (upright) and the encoding will work, too.


2

You have to lower by 0.4pt which is the width of the line \box0\lower0.4pt\box2 With this \documentclass[a4paper,11pt]{article} \usepackage{letltxmacro} %MACRO \LetLtxMacro{\oldsqrt}{\sqrt} % makes all sqrts closed \renewcommand{\sqrt}[1][\ ]{% \def\DHLindex{#1}\mathpalette\DHLhksqrt} \def\DHLhksqrt#1#2{% ...


5

Never pile up font package loading. The fourier package uses math fonts with a different encoding from the standard, so it changes several slot positions. On the other hand, the lxfonts use the standard encodings for math symbols, so loading fourier will have strange effects like the one you're describing. By the way, your package loading order is a bit ...



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