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6

Just scale it. \documentclass{article} % large ops, copied from shuffle font package \DeclareFontFamily{U}{bigshuffle}{} \DeclareFontShape{U}{bigshuffle}{m}{n}{ <5-8> s*[1.7] shuffle7 <8-> s*[1.7] shuffle10 }{} \DeclareSymbolFont{BigShuffle}{U}{bigshuffle}{m}{n} \DeclareMathSymbol\bigshuffle{\mathop}{BigShuffle}{"001} ...


7

For such a simple geometric symbol, scaling it seems the easiest road. You might want a larger factor than 1.2 for text style, adjust at will. However, 2 is the right scaling factor for display style. \documentclass{article} \usepackage{amssymb,graphicx} \newcommand{\bDiamond}{\mathbin{\Diamond}} \makeatletter ...


0

A bit more about "c or not to c"... The inverse hyperbolic sine sinh^(-1)z (Beyer 1987, p. 181; Zwillinger 1995, p. 481), sometimes called the area hyperbolic sine (Harris and Stocker 1998, p. 264) and sometimes denoted arcsinhz (Jeffrey 2000, p. 124), is the multivalued function that is the inverse function of the hyperbolic sine. The variants Arcsinhz or ...


8

The align environment expects a relation symbol after &, as the point of alignment, so there is an implicit {} at the beginning of the second column (and all other even numbered columns). This has the unfortunate consequence that, if a math operator follows &, a thin space is added, because of TeX's spacing rules: when a math operator follows an ...


8

Since the question already answers the cause of the space. The macro, defined by \DeclareMathOperator is defined as \mathop with additional spacing in some situations. Here align adds an empty math ordinary atom to get correct spacing for binary or relation symbols. Also a space is added between \mathord and \mathop. In this case the space can be avoided ...



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