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5

If by “other TeX” you mean LaTeX then use a dedicated chemistry package: \documentclass{article} \usepackage{chemformula} \begin{document} \ch{^{239}Np} \\ \ch{^{239}_{93}Np} % or \ch{^{239}93Np} \end{document} or \documentclass{article} \usepackage[version=4]{mhchem} \begin{document} \ce{^{239}Np} \\ \ce{^{239}_{93}Np} \end{document} or \...


3

Obviously Np should be upright. Hence \documentclass{article} \usepackage{tensor} \begin{document} $^{239}\mathrm{Np}$ With tensor package: $\tensor[^{239}]{\mathrm{Np}}{}$ But with both numbers not $\tensor[^{239}_{93}]{\mathrm{Np}}{}$ but $\tensor*[^{239}_{93}]{\mathrm{Np}}{}$ \end{document}


2

You could throw in a negative kern and that would close up some of the space. \documentclass[10pt,letterpaper]{article} \begin{document} ${}^{239}N\kern -1pt p$ \end{document} You could also use the elements package: \documentclass[10pt,letterpaper]{article} \usepackage{elements} \begin{document} $^{239}$\elementsymbol{Neptunium} The electron ...


2

Figured it out. It is done by a level of indirection: \def\foo#1{\foox#1\\} \def\foox[#1]#2\\{The\ first\ argument\ is\ ''#1'',\ the\ second\ one\ is\ ''#2''} \foo{[hi]there} Basically, I need to specify a termination token. So, \foo will call with a single token (stuff within the {/} characters), which in turn calls \foox with a termination character ...


4

You can put the column labels inside a right overlap, which effectively puts it inside a zero-width box that is left-aligned: $$ \begin{array}{r|lll} & \rlap{\text{number of foo}} \\ \text{number of bar} & 0 & 1 & 2 \\ \hline 0 & 0.125 & 0.250 & 0.168 \\ 1 & 0.125 & 0.250 & 0.168 \\ 2 & 0....



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