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The fundamental part of the matrix construction looks like this: \documentclass{article} \newcommand{\mc}{\multicolumn{1}{c}} \begin{document} \[ \renewcommand{\arraystretch}{1.2} \left( \begin{array}{ c c | c c | c c } \multicolumn{1}{|c}{} & & 0 & \mc{0} & 0 & 0 \\ ...


2

A simple solution using etoolbox. Note you'll have to write the same command for every type of matrix environment. I also use the nccmath package to use \mfrac (medium-sized fractions), a \dfrac in a matrix would be too big, in my opinion: \documentclass{article} \usepackage{mathtools, nccmath, etoolbox} ...


4

Here's a possibility: \documentclass{article} \usepackage{amsmath,array} \makeatletter \def\env@dmatrix{\hskip -\arraycolsep \let\@ifnextchar\new@ifnextchar \extrarowheight=2ex \array{*\c@MaxMatrixCols{>{\displaystyle}c}}} \newenvironment{dmatrix} {\env@dmatrix} {\endarray\hskip-\arraycolsep} \newenvironment{bdmatrix} {\left[\env@dmatrix} ...


0

A solution is to proceed as follow : \documentclass{article} \begin{document} $ \begin{matrix} {\displaystyle \lim_x} \end{matrix} $ \end{document} Hope it'll help you.


1

One option using blkarray: The code: \documentclass{article} \usepackage{blkarray} \usepackage{amsmath} \begin{document} \[ \begin{blockarray}{ccccc} x_{1} & x_{2} & \cdots & x_{n} \\ \begin{block}{[cccc|c]} a_{11} & a_{12} & \cdots & a_{1n} & b_{1} \\ a_{21} & a_{22} & \cdots & a_{2n} & b_{2} \\ ...


3

I hope the following is what you're looking for. \documentclass{article} \usepackage{amsmath,mleftright} \mleftright % eliminate whitespace inserted by \left and \right \begin{document} \[ \left( \begin{bmatrix}M_{11}&M_{12}\\M_{21}&M_{22}\end{bmatrix} + \begin{bmatrix}A_{11}&A_{12}\\A_{21}&A_{22}\end{bmatrix} \right) \begin{bmatrix} ...


2

Summarizing some of my earlier comments: Use the standalone package with the option preview in order to avoid getting an error message about a missing $ symbol. Don't use $$ in a LaTeX document to start and end displaymath mode, as it's quite deprecated. See Why is [ ... ] preferable to $$ ... $$? for more information on this subject. The matrix ...



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