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7

This is very basic. Obviously you need to adjust the tick labels etc. for your purposes. But you want code which looks something like this: \documentclass[tikz, border=5pt]{standalone} \usepackage{pgfplots} \begin{document} \begin{tikzpicture} \begin{axis}% ref: http://tex.stackexchange.com/a/147772/ by Harish Kumar \addplot [ domain=-0:2*pi, ...


3

Here are two examples that produce "attached lables", one using transform shape, the other using rotation correction. \documentclass[tikz,border=7mm]{standalone} \usetikzlibrary{calc} \begin{document} \begin{tikzpicture} \foreach \i in {0,30,..., 330} \draw[red, ->, rotate=\i, transform shape] (0,0) -- +(0:3) node[rotate=-90,above]{fixed}; ...


2

You don't need overpic actually. You can do it just using Tikz. But we need to modify your code as follows: Both the image (I used an example one) and the node go inside a tikzpicture. You can combine the \draw and the \node, no need to specify both. The image will be inside a \includegraphics, which in turn will be inside of a node itself, with the anchor ...


2

Unless you need to do more complex stuff, you can use tikz-cd. Output Code \documentclass{article} \usepackage{tikz-cd} \begin{document} \begin{figure}[!h] \[ \begin{tikzcd} & & & 4 \arrow[dr, rightarrow] & \\ 3 \arrow[r, leftrightarrow] & 1 \arrow[r, leftrightarrow] & 0 \arrow[r, rightarrow] \arrow[ur, rightarrow] & 8 ...


2

A wide range of examples for drawing graphs with tikz can be found here. Also the pgfmanual has examples and much more information. For adjusting the images style please refer to this resources. Here a simple matrix-based solution for your problem. \documentclass[tikz, border=6mm]{standalone} \usetikzlibrary{matrix} \begin{document} ...


2

This is a known issue, and it has been treated before1 but it could be a problem in the code for the fit library.2 However you can use the solution found in one of those questions and use the label instead. I also think it's easier if you create a new command for placing your nodes which reduces 3 lines of code for one node, to one line of code, using the ...


2

You can put a sine curve as a tikz picture inside a node. \begin{tikzpicture} \node[draw,circle,inner sep=-0.4pt] at (0,0) {\tikz \draw[scale=0.15,domain=-3.141:3.141,smooth,variable=\t] plot (\t,{sin(\t r)});}; \end{tikzpicture}


2

A simple way of doing this is with a path picture. Using some extra magic, the path picture can be set up so (-1,-1) is the lower left corner and (1,1) is the upper right corner of the picture. This makes it quite straightforward to specify path picture elements. \documentclass[tikz,border=5]{standalone} \tikzset{% do path picture/.style={% path ...


1

This works perfect as long as your text doesn't get too long. \documentclass[tikz, border=6mm]{standalone} \begin{document} \begin{tikzpicture}[x=1mm, y=1mm] \coordinate[](0_r1) at (0,22.5); \coordinate[](0_r2) at (0,42); \coordinate[](0_r3) at (0,49); \coordinate[](b1_r2) at (14.4,42); \coordinate[](b1_r3) at (14.4,49); ...


1

I think you're looking for inner {x|y}sep=0pt. Adjust it according your needs. Following code uses inner xsep=0pt and the result is: \documentclass[tikz,border=2mm]{standalone} \usetikzlibrary{fit} \begin{document} \begin{tikzpicture} \node at (0,0) (CE1) {\includegraphics[height=3ex]{example-image-a}}; \node at (2,0) (PE1) ...


1

You can play with looseness parameter or some others which are explained in section "70.3 Curves" from pgfmanual \documentclass[tikz,border=2mm]{standalone} \usetikzlibrary{arrows} \begin{document} \begin{tikzpicture}[->,>=stealth', shorten >=1pt, auto, node distance=5cm, thick,main node/.style={circle, fill=blue!20,draw,thick,align=center}] ...



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