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6

You can use decorations.text library: \documentclass{article} \usepackage{tikz} \usetikzlibrary{calc} \usetikzlibrary{decorations.text} \begin{document} \begin{tikzpicture}[scale=5] \coordinate [label=above right:ut] (ut) at (2,0); \coordinate [label=above right:fa'] (fa') at (4,0); \coordinate [label=above:C] (C) at (2, 2.4); \coordinate ...


5

The barycentric coordinate system can be useful here. \documentclass[12pt]{article} \usepackage[utf8]{inputenc} \usepackage{tikz} \usepackage{wasysym} \usetikzlibrary{shapes.geometric, calc} \newcommand{\mydiamond}[7][]{% \begin{scope}[transform shape] \node [alias=los, diamond, draw, fill=#3, #1] (#2) {} ; \draw ([yshift=-0.3] los.north) -- ...


4

If you only want to center the node in the horizontal part of the path you can split the path in three segments: \documentclass[border=3pt]{standalone} \usepackage{tikz} \begin{document} \begin{tikzpicture}[bob/.style={outer sep=0pt,text width=2.5em,align=center,draw}] \node[bob] (A) {1200} ; \node[bob,anchor=east] (B) at (A.west) {100} ; ...


4

I have no time to do all of them. Here are some examples. (forget \newcommand) \documentclass{minimal} \usepackage{tikz} \begin{document} \makeatletter \pgfdeclareshape{slits}{ \savedanchor\centerpoint{\pgf@x=0cm \pgf@y=0cm} \saveddimen\halfwidth{ \pgf@x=.25cm \pgfmathsetlength\pgf@xa{.5\pgfkeysvalueof{/pgf/minimum width}} ...


3

I should not do it for you but... just to illustrate that everything is possible. I added a new answer instead of editing the existing one because the source code is now much longer and contains ugly manipulations. Beware that I modified some \pgfdeclareshape's. \documentclass[a4,landscape]{article} \usepackage{tikz} \begin{document} \makeatletter ...


3

(I'm not entirely sure if this is what you're after.) By adding name=leg to the legend style, the legend box will get the (node) name leg. You can add nodes relative to this, if you place them outside the axis. For example: \documentclass[ a4paper ]{scrartcl} \usepackage{ amsmath, tikz, pgfplots, } \usepackage{lmodern} \usepackage[T1]{fontenc} ...


3

First we draw an invisible circle node that will guide us when placing B, C and D: \node (x) [circle,below right=6cm of id,minimum size=5.5cm,anchor=center]{}; The next step is to place BCD with respect to our x node using border anchors: \node (acquire) [stage,fill=white] at (x.135){B}; \node (assess) [stage,fill=white] at (x.45){C}; \node (persuade) ...


2

Working example without the problem mentioned above, using explicit bounding box as recommended by @Andrew Swann; \documentclass[12pt]{standalone} \usepackage{amsmath} \usepackage{amssymb} \usepackage{tikz} \usepackage{gnuplot-lua-tikz} \usepackage[shell]{gnuplottex} \thispagestyle{empty} \begin{document} \begin{tikzpicture} \draw [draw=none,use as ...


2

Update: This seems to be what the OP really wants. Code \documentclass[]{standalone} \usepackage{tikz} \usetikzlibrary{positioning} \tikzset{ pipe/.style = { draw, %top color=gray!60, %bottom color=gray!20, minimum width=4cm, minimum height=.1cm, anchor=east, }, source/.style = { draw, %top color=gray!60, ...


2

For the arrows, you can use three small 'short' segments to put the arrows on the nodes: \begin{circuitikz} \draw (0,4) to [R, l=R1] (2,4) to [short, -*, i=$I_1$] (3,4) to [short, i<=$I_2$] (4,4) to [R, l=R2] (6,4) (3,4) to [short, i=$I_3$] (3,3) to [R, l=R3] (3,1) ; \end{circuitikz} I'm not sure I understood the label problem. I use a lx label, ...


2

You can use the calc-library to set the connection-points for your lines. It's a simple approach which should be enough in the most situations. A small MWE: \documentclass[tikz, border=5mm]{standalone} \usetikzlibrary{calc} \begin{document} \begin{tikzpicture} \node at (0,0) [draw, rectangle, minimum height=2cm, minimum width=.5cm] (mynode) {}; ...


2

Next code shows another possibility for drawing parallel lines between nodes without using calc tikzlibrary. It uses (node.angle) syntax for starting points and |- or -| intersection coordinate for ending ones. If you want exact coordinates like 1/3 of node's vertical length you need calc library, but if you can accept something just visually good enough, ...


2

I´ve used package rotating with \begin{turn}{ang} "stuff to be rotated" \end{turn} which ist working for me. Just adding transform shape, as percusse mentioned, worked perfectly though.


1

Let me answer my own question because I think I have solved my problem. I met some difficulties to get there so if it can be used for other I'll explain in detail. 1/ I downloaded the PGF_3.0.0 package here. 2/ I unzipped it and save it on my desktop. 3/ I copy all the folders in the following directory : /Desktop/pgf_3.0.0.tds/tex/generic 4/ I paste ...



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