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2

As @Gonzalo Medina suggested, I turned my comment into an answer. When you setup a matrix in Tikz and use nodes={...} as an option for the matrix itself, you specify the default behavior of the nodes. If you want to change the appearance of a single node, just put your specifications inside two vertical bars |...|: this notation accepts the specifications ...


2

Control the inner sep and outer sep like \node[inner sep=0pt,outer sep=-0.4pt] {}; Here 0.4pt is the \pgflinewidth without which a small separtion appears. Another option is to use \node[shape=coordinate] {}; Code: \documentclass[a4paper,12pt]{article} \usepackage{tikz, tikz-qtree} \begin{document} \begin{tikzpicture} ...


4

Because the nodes for those labels are circular in shape. Remove the draw=none from those labels to see them. Remedy is to add rectangle in node[rectangle,draw=none,fill=none,left]{\small$(\f..... You may add small in the node options like node[rectangle,draw=none,fill=none,left,font=\small]{$(\f.... BTW. Better, define a new style for these labels as ...


6

Apart from text opacity, you can use node contents \newcommand*{\MyTikzPicture}[1] {% \begin{tikzpicture} \draw [draw=green, ultra thick] (1,0) -- (2,0); % Should only be visible in (2) \draw [ultra thick, Line Draw Style] (0,0) -- (3,0) node [pos=0.5, ultra thick, text=black, node contents={$A$}, Text Style] {} %%<-- here ...


0

If I were you, PSTricks would be my first resort. \rput has angular parameter for rotation. If we prefix the angle with *, the rotation will be absolute. For example, consider \rput{60}(0,0){\rput{*45}(0,0){Object}}. The object will be rotated 45 degrees rather 105 degrees. \documentclass[pstricks,border=12pt,12pt]{standalone} \def\Axes{% ...


1

You don't need to specify the angles; TikZ can do the calculations for you! Here's an option that guarantees that the labels are placed at the same distance from the end of the segments and in the appropriate direction (that of each of the segments): The code: \documentclass[border=5pt]{standalone} \usepackage{tikz} \usetikzlibrary{calc} ...


2

Have you tried something like node[pos=xx]? \documentclass{standalone} \usepackage{tikz} \begin{document} \begin{tikzpicture} \draw[<->,rotate around={22.5:(0,0)}] (0,1) --(0,0.2) node[pos=-0.2] {$y$} -- (1,0.2) node[pos=1.2] {$x$}; \end{tikzpicture} \end{document} The pos key of a node places it that position along the ...


4

There's no need to define a new shape; the shapes.geometric library already offers you the trapezium shape; with this, you can simply define a style; the already existing anchors for the trapezium can now be easily used for the in and out parts: \documentclass{article} \usepackage{tikz} \usetikzlibrary{shapes.geometric} \tikzset{ multiplexer/.style={ ...


4

You can use a pic for this. \documentclass[tikz,border=7mm]{standalone} \usetikzlibrary{calc,quotes} \tikzset{ multiplexer/.pic ={ \coordinate (-out) at (.8,0); \coordinate (-in-up) at (-0.8,.5); \coordinate (-in-down) at (-0.8,-.5); \draw[pic actions] (-.5,1.25) -- ++(1,-.5) -- ++(0,-1.5) -- ++(-1,-.5) --cycle; \draw[pic actions] ...


4

Here is a solution. A node needs a coordinate to go with. The first trial has no associated coordinate (need to put the node after a coordinate), thus causing errors. The second trial has a coordinate to associate to, but it is associated to the top node because the line was drawn from bottom to top. In such case, Gonzalo Medina's solution is crucial where ...


1

The posted code no longer works for me, so I played around to create a forest solution, which can also automatise things a bit (in case you have a large tree or many such trees!). Rather than using tabular environments, this solution uses the edge path to simulate multi-part nodes/tabulars. The solution should, hopefully, work for any number of cells on the ...


0

Here is an example : \documentclass[border=1cm]{standalone} \usepackage{tikz} \usepackage{pgfplots} \pgfplotsset{compat=1.10} \begin{document} \begin{tikzpicture} \begin{axis}[xlabel={x},ylabel={y},grid, width=14cm, xmin=0, xmax=4.55e-3, ymin=0, ymax=1] \end{axis} \node[below right=1cm, font=\Large\bf] (T) {Hello text}; \draw[thick, ...


2

This is a modified version of Kevin C's answer showing how to use styles to reduce the code needed to typeset the trees and help ensure consistency. Whether this is useful or not probably depends on how many such trees you have to do! .wrap value is used to automate the addition of linguistic categories to the nodes. So, instead of writing ...


2

Since the columns environment contains just the trees, you may want to set the \linespread parameter to 1 for just the columns environment. Also, the forest package makes drawing linguistic trees much easier. Code \documentclass{beamer} \beamertemplatenavigationsymbolsempty \usepackage[utf8]{inputenc} \setbeamertemplate{navigation symbols}{} ...


0

insert \linespread{1}\selectfont above the first node definition within the tikzpicture environment.



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