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4

Here is a solution with pst-node and arydshln. Is consists in using an ordinary tabularx environment and defining the relevant cells as nodes of various types and linking them with node connections. It compiles with xelatex only. \documentclass{article} \usepackage{array, tabularx, arydshln} \usepackage{geometry} \usepackage{pst-node, multido} \usepackage{...


7

By generating a table, do you mean making one in the first place? I recommend breaking something like this down into individual tasks (like the list you made) and approaching it one step at a time, starting from a very basic structure and gradually building it up. Each of these tasks can be found in various examples across the internet (particularly here) ...


1

Using option remember picture for your original pictures, and options overlay, remember picture for the picture with whatever lines you need to draw, should do the trick (but be aware that a name clash could occur if identically named nodes exist in both pictures; furthermore, a picture with option overlay doesn't reserve any space in the page): \...


2

If this is meant to be just one diagram, then you don't need to split it in two tikzpicture environments. Just place the mindmap in a scope environment with the same options as the existing tikzpicture, but adding something like xshift=20cm,yshift=-5cm. I defined a coordinate at the end, after said scope environment, and drew some arrows from that point. ...


1

Not entirely sure what you want here, there really isn't too much information. Also, there was a lot of code which could be simplified. I am sure this could be solved a lot better than this. \documentclass{standalone} \usepackage{tikz} \usepackage{amsfonts, amsmath, amsthm, amssymb} \usepackage[utf8]{inputenc} %\usepackage{dtklogos} \usepackage{tikz} \...


6

Because each of them are separate paths from each node shape border to the other. The final construction is equivalent to (using convenience of their locations) \filldraw (a.-90) -- (c.90) % pen is lifted here hence a new path starts (c.45) -- (f.-135) -- cycle; Hence cycle goes back to (c.45) as it is the starting point of the unbroken path ...


2

Not actually sure how useful/advisable this is: \documentclass[tikz,border=5]{standalone} \newdimen\tmpvec \tikzset{Minimum Size/.code={% \pgfpointxy{#1}{#1}% \tikzset{minimum width/.expanded=\the\csname pgf@x\endcsname, minimum height/.expanded=\the\csname pgf@y\endcsname}% }} \begin{document} \begin{tikzpicture}[every node/.style={draw, ...


1

First question: \node (action5) [action, label=0:{Send message to A \\ response(projection)}] at (action4 -| test1){}; % Second question: \draw[->,red] (wait1)--($(test1)!(wait1)!(action5)$) node[pos=0.3,above] {response(complete)}; Please don't just add code that doesn't compile (missing lots of styles and libraries). Not only it is super ...


5

You must specify the dimensions: \pgfmathsetmacro{\R}{1.2cm + 0.2cm} Otherwise it is interpreted as points and the size of the circle is of the inner sep. Edit: \node is a command of Tikz and the default is in cm, as per the manual: If you do not provide a unit, as in (2,1), you specify a point in pgf’s xy-coordinate system. By default, the unit x-...


1

You can use append after command (or similar) to add a path to the node, referencing the node using \tikzlastnode. For example and using a trick I got from Alenanno: \documentclass[tikz,border=10pt,multi]{standalone} \usetikzlibrary{calc} \tikzset{ parallelogram/.style={ append after command={% courtesy of Alenanno ref: http://tex.stackexchange.com/...


1

Here's a suggestion which doesn't use nesting of tikzpictures. To position the plots I've simply positioned origingreen relative to the teacher2 node using \coordinate (origingreen) at ([yshift=-5cm,xshift=0.5cm]teacher2.south west);. The axis lines are already drawn relative to the origin, so what remains is to shift the plot, and that you can do by adding ...


1

The simplest method is probably to place the nodes below right and below left of the .south anchor of the upper node to centre the upper block relative to the lower ones. To centre the upper block relative to the frame, it is probably easiest to draw the lower blocks first and then centre the upper block relative to the current bounding box. I've also ...


2

If forest is an option, it is reasonably straightforward to define a fit whole subtree style. I don't recommend a triangular shape. Although I experimented a bit, this inevitably looked very ugly. However, fit whole subtree can be passed whatever options you wish to style the node. By default, it draws a rectangle in red. Note that multiple uses of fit ...


4

You can use above right or below right as a possible parameter for node. For instance: \node [block, above right=of a1] (a2) {A2}; You can also use seperate distances for above or right: \node [block, above right=2cm and 1cm of a1] (a2) {A2}; To recreate your image example, you'd use: \node [block, right=of a1] (a2) {A2}; \node [block, above right=of ...


2

You have used axis y line*=left to have the y-axis only on the left, and applying a similar option, axis x line*=bottom, seems to work: Code: \documentclass{standalone} \usepackage{mathtools} \usepackage{pgfplots} \usepackage{siunitx} \sisetup{per-mode=symbol} \DeclareSIUnit{\fahrenheit}{\degree F} \DeclareSIUnit{\pound}{lbm} \begin{document} \begin{...


5

Draw the grid but clipped with a convenient path. \documentclass[tikz,border=2mm]{standalone} \begin{document} \begin{tikzpicture} \clip[draw] (0,-3cm) -- (3,0) -- (0,3)--(-3,0)--cycle; \draw[step=.5, red, thin] (-3cm,-3cm) grid (3cm,3cm); \end{tikzpicture} \end{document} **Update: ** From Kevin comments I understand that he wants to draw a non ...


4

Here is a suggestion using the fadings library. Note that I use a lightgray background to show the size of the picture. Code: \documentclass[margin=5mm]{standalone} \usepackage{lmodern} \usepackage{tikz} \usetikzlibrary{fadings} \newsavebox\picturebox \begin{document} \savebox\picturebox{\includegraphics[width=10cm]{picture}} \begin{...


2

You mean something like this? \documentclass{scrartcl} \usepackage{tikz} \usetikzlibrary{backgrounds} \begin{document} \begin{tikzpicture} \node[font=\Huge] (A) at (5,2.5) {TEST}; \begin{scope}[on background layer] \clip(A.south west) rectangle (A.north east); \fill[red] (0,0) rectangle (10,5); \end{scope} \end{tikzpicture} \end{document}



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