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2

For the arrows, you can use three small 'short' segments to put the arrows on the nodes: \begin{circuitikz} \draw (0,4) to [R, l=R1] (2,4) to [short, -*, i=$I_1$] (3,4) to [short, i<=$I_2$] (4,4) to [R, l=R2] (6,4) (3,4) to [short, i=$I_3$] (3,3) to [R, l=R3] (3,1) ; \end{circuitikz} I'm not sure I understood the label problem. I use a lx label, ...


6

You can use decorations.text library: \documentclass{article} \usepackage{tikz} \usetikzlibrary{calc} \usetikzlibrary{decorations.text} \begin{document} \begin{tikzpicture}[scale=5] \coordinate [label=above right:ut] (ut) at (2,0); \coordinate [label=above right:fa'] (fa') at (4,0); \coordinate [label=above:C] (C) at (2, 2.4); \coordinate ...


4

If you only want to center the node in the horizontal part of the path you can split the path in three segments: \documentclass[border=3pt]{standalone} \usepackage{tikz} \begin{document} \begin{tikzpicture}[bob/.style={outer sep=0pt,text width=2.5em,align=center,draw}] \node[bob] (A) {1200} ; \node[bob,anchor=east] (B) at (A.west) {100} ; ...


2

Working example without the problem mentioned above, using explicit bounding box as recommended by @Andrew Swann; \documentclass[12pt]{standalone} \usepackage{amsmath} \usepackage{amssymb} \usepackage{tikz} \usepackage{gnuplot-lua-tikz} \usepackage[shell]{gnuplottex} \thispagestyle{empty} \begin{document} \begin{tikzpicture} \draw [draw=none,use as ...


5

The barycentric coordinate system can be useful here. \documentclass[12pt]{article} \usepackage[utf8]{inputenc} \usepackage{tikz} \usepackage{wasysym} \usetikzlibrary{shapes.geometric, calc} \newcommand{\mydiamond}[7][]{% \begin{scope}[transform shape] \node [alias=los, diamond, draw, fill=#3, #1] (#2) {} ; \draw ([yshift=-0.3] los.north) -- ...


3

First we draw an invisible circle node that will guide us when placing B, C and D: \node (x) [circle,below right=6cm of id,minimum size=5.5cm,anchor=center]{}; The next step is to place BCD with respect to our x node using border anchors: \node (acquire) [stage,fill=white] at (x.135){B}; \node (assess) [stage,fill=white] at (x.45){C}; \node (persuade) ...


2

I´ve used package rotating with \begin{turn}{ang} "stuff to be rotated" \end{turn} which ist working for me. Just adding transform shape, as percusse mentioned, worked perfectly though.


2

Next code shows another possibility for drawing parallel lines between nodes without using calc tikzlibrary. It uses (node.angle) syntax for starting points and |- or -| intersection coordinate for ending ones. If you want exact coordinates like 1/3 of node's vertical length you need calc library, but if you can accept something just visually good enough, ...


2

You can use the calc-library to set the connection-points for your lines. It's a simple approach which should be enough in the most situations. A small MWE: \documentclass[tikz, border=5mm]{standalone} \usetikzlibrary{calc} \begin{document} \begin{tikzpicture} \node at (0,0) [draw, rectangle, minimum height=2cm, minimum width=.5cm] (mynode) {}; ...


3

I should not do it for you but... just to illustrate that everything is possible. I added a new answer instead of editing the existing one because the source code is now much longer and contains ugly manipulations. Beware that I modified some \pgfdeclareshape's. \documentclass[a4,landscape]{article} \usepackage{tikz} \begin{document} \makeatletter ...


4

I have no time to do all of them. Here are some examples. (forget \newcommand) \documentclass{minimal} \usepackage{tikz} \begin{document} \makeatletter \pgfdeclareshape{slits}{ \savedanchor\centerpoint{\pgf@x=0cm \pgf@y=0cm} \saveddimen\halfwidth{ \pgf@x=.25cm \pgfmathsetlength\pgf@xa{.5\pgfkeysvalueof{/pgf/minimum width}} ...


2

Update: This seems to be what the OP really wants. Code \documentclass[]{standalone} \usepackage{tikz} \usetikzlibrary{positioning} \tikzset{ pipe/.style = { draw, %top color=gray!60, %bottom color=gray!20, minimum width=4cm, minimum height=.1cm, anchor=east, }, source/.style = { draw, %top color=gray!60, ...


3

(I'm not entirely sure if this is what you're after.) By adding name=leg to the legend style, the legend box will get the (node) name leg. You can add nodes relative to this, if you place them outside the axis. For example: \documentclass[ a4paper ]{scrartcl} \usepackage{ amsmath, tikz, pgfplots, } \usepackage{lmodern} \usepackage[T1]{fontenc} ...


1

Let me answer my own question because I think I have solved my problem. I met some difficulties to get there so if it can be used for other I'll explain in detail. 1/ I downloaded the PGF_3.0.0 package here. 2/ I unzipped it and save it on my desktop. 3/ I copy all the folders in the following directory : /Desktop/pgf_3.0.0.tds/tex/generic 4/ I paste ...


3

matrix of math nodes implements the following node structure \node (<matrixname>-<row #>-<col#>) {$<contents>$}; Here <contents> is replaced with whatever is found as the matrix entry. When the \nodepart is used, it is still in math mode and it trips up the macro. The correct way should have been \node ...



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