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4

I would (and I do) cite it as a @manual: @manual{tantau:2013a, author = {Till Tantau}, title = {The TikZ and PGF Packages}, subtitle = {Manual for version 3.0.0}, url = {http://sourceforge.net/projects/pgf/}, date = {2013-12-20}, } The same goes for other packages.


1

Specifically for the TikZ graphdrawing library, I would recommend citing the following formally archived peer-reviewed article. @inproceedings{Tan12, author = {Tantau, Till}, title = {Graph Drawing in {TikZ}}, booktitle = {Proceedings of the 20th International Conference on Graph Drawing}, series = {GD'12}, year = {2013}, isbn = ...


2

A non-GUI option is GLE. It can be a little hard to use but for publication-quality data-driven graphs you can't really beat it. Here's a motivating example. I'm not sure how you'd create something like this that looks as good in any other package. It's possible in IPE but it can be tedious if you change the data and have to manually update the graph; with ...


1

balance.sty is part of the preprint bundle. The most recommendable way is to install preprint using the package manager of your distribution. For completeness, of course you could download balance from CTAN (.dtx and .ins file) and run the .ins file with LaTeX. Further explanation on installing can be found on this site.


3

This seems to work: \begin{filecontents*}{\jobname.bib} @article{papersubmitted, title = {{I love LaTeX, and you?}}, author = {Author1, Name and Author2, Name and Author3, Name}, year = {submitted}, } \end{filecontents*} \documentclass{article} \usepackage[authoryear]{natbib} \begin{document} \citep{papersubmitted} \bibliographystyle{plainnat} ...


3

Monospaced fonts usually set up two features: no hyphenation, and no stretching or shrinking of the interword spaces. Courier, selected by \usepackage{courier} is no exception. The reason is that enabling hyphenation or flexible interword space would have undesired effects on listings, which are the main use for monospaced fonts. Moreover, long texts in ...


1

Using the exact technique I employed at Typing Following notation in Latex. One only has to uncomment the two fonttable lines in my MWE to ascertain that \equalclosed was symbol 221 of MnSyC. At that point, changing the pointer, the glphy macro, and the mathbin to mathrel was all that was needed. \documentclass{article} \DeclareFontFamily{U} ...


3

I've been encouraged by the Great Old Ones of the TeX world to submit when I have something usable. Your style file may seem to you like a tool of limited application; but it could wind up being exactly what somebody needed for some unforeseeable reason. Furthermore, even if people don't use your package for its intended purpose, it's quite possible that ...


3

The key is to use \getrefnumber from refcount instead of your \lineref, because \ref doesn't expand to a number, but is much more complicated when hyperref is involved, as it wants to create links. \documentclass{article} \usepackage{xcolor} \definecolor{dkgreen}{rgb}{0,0.6,0} \definecolor{mauve}{rgb}{0.58,0,0.82} \usepackage{listings} \usepackage{refcount} ...


3

You can make your life easier if you could switch to xelatex or lualatex: \documentclass[a4paper]{article} \usepackage{fontspec} \usepackage{libertine} \usepackage[polutonikogreek,english]{babel} \begin{document} The starting verse of the Iliad is \begin{quotation} Μῆνιν ἄειδε, θεά, Πηληιάδεω Ἀχιλῆος \end{quotation} and it's really great. \end{document} ...


5

It's a good question, because the issue can happen to other users. For several years, the only practical way for inputting Greek was through a transliteration table (a for alpha, b for beta, 'a for alpha with tonos and so on). TeX Live 2012 included the lgrx package that allowed direct UTF-8 input of Greek, so that a UTF-8 document like ...


0

No, it isn't safe. \SS may come from a transformation of \ss (lowercase ß) to uppercase in a running headline. When you redefine it, and by bad chance a German sharp s is in your chapter or section title, the running headline may have an unexpected look. Followup errors like "missing $ inserted" may occur too, depending on your re-definition of \SS.


2

Concerning the safety of re-defining command \SS (which is the capital of "ß") in order to shorten the command \mathcal{S}, @egreg said: "Not really safe: your bibliographic data might contain a ß that in turn might be capitalized: the final result would be at least puzzling." That is definitely true, so I've decided to follow the suggestion given by ...


1

You can change the package repository: I suppose not all of them are missing a digital signature. A British, French or German repository should be OK. As a last resort, you could try downloading by hand from one of the three canonical sites with Filezilla. Packages are located in: …/systems/win32/miktex/tm/packages E.g., for Dante goto ...


5

If you want to see, what a command is used for, you can use the \show macro: % arara: pdflatex \documentclass{article} \begin{document} %\show\cS \show\SS \end{document} This will show: \SS=macro: ->\T1-cmd \SS \T1\SS . l.7 \show\SS Ok, this information is not so cool, but you can see that is has something to do with the T1 encoding and you see ...


6

Both option/package combinations can be easily merged: \usepackage{graphicx} Of course different drivers cannot be used for parts of the document. If you are using pdflatex, then option pdftex can be omitted, because the standard graphics.cfg of MiKTeX or TeX Live is able to detect pdfTeX in PDF mode and sets the option appropriately. \usepackage{tikz} ...


3

\usepackage[something]{inputenc} tells LaTeX which input encoding to expect. This is the encoding that your document is saved in. You cannot save your document in two different encodings. (You could make two copies - one per encoding - but a single file has a single encoding.) So you cannot use both \usepackage[utf8]{inputenc} and ...


7

I don't know where this [pdftex] habit originates but you don't need to use it. You can read a few answers on this site too about it but in a nut shell, most modern packages know what the current driver is and they can decide. Providing a fixed option is only looking for trouble. In your example, TikZ already loads graphicx so you don't need to do ...


1

\iftrue %\iffalse \usepackage[latin1]{inputenc} \usepackage{tikz} \usetikzlibrary{shapes,arrows} \else \usepackage{graphicx} \usepackage[T1]{fontenc} \usepackage[utf8]{inputenc} \fi In this case the first three are used. If you comment \iftrue and uncomment \iffalse it will be the other way round.


16

Whether such an update is allowed at all depends entirely on the licence/copyright conditions under which the original code was distributed. If it is LPPL version 1.3 there are explicit conditions under which maintenance may be taken over. Similarly if it is GPL then in place edits are not blocked by the licence. But in general, unless such a licence has ...


9

If you're open to using XeTeX or LuaTeX, you might find some possibilities in the excellent fontawesome font and its corresponding package (containing easy-to-use macros). Here are a few options: \documentclass{article} \usepackage{fontawesome} % requires XeTeX or LuaTeX \newcommand{\cmark}{\faOk} \newcommand{\pmark}{\faWarningSign} \begin{document} ...


38

Well it's not rocket science either \begin{tikzpicture}[limb/.style={line cap=round,line width=1.5mm,line join=bevel}] \draw[line width=2mm,rounded corners,fill=yellow] (-2,0) -- (0,-2) -- (2,0) -- (0,2) -- cycle; \fill (1.5mm,7mm) circle (1.5mm); \fill(0,-7.5mm) -- ++(10mm,0mm) -- ++(120:2mm)--++(100:1mm)--++(150:2mm) arc (70:170:2.5mm and 1mm); ...


21

I didn't find such a sign in the LaTeX symbol guide, so here is a tikz solution: Look for a nice sign on Wikipedia, download the svg file, convert svg to tikz with Inkscape. Then you can build a command like this: \documentclass{article} \usepackage{pifont} \usepackage{tikz} \definecolor{cec1d24}{RGB}{236,29,36} \definecolor{cffffff}{RGB}{255,255,255} ...


4

Agreeing with Christian Hupfer, you can only include the graphics directly. There is no symbol explicitly for this. Possibly, you can reconstruct using TikZ or other packages. For now, this should do. \documentclass{article} \usepackage[right=10cm,paperheight=4cm]{geometry} \usepackage[textwidth=8cm,shadow]{todonotes} \usepackage{pifont} ...


1

With pdfTeX or XeTeX you can't hook into the code for detecting when \inputlineno changes. It's just a read only integer parameter that's updated in a part of the program the user hasn't access to. Possibly the reader function in LuaTeX, described in section 4.1.2.1.1, might help with this engine.


0

I use the gantt package. It is simple enough in my experience, but then again, I am not doing anything too fancy like the multiple dependencies shown in the previous answer.



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